Hepatic progenitor cells in liver regeneration: current advances and clinical perspectives

Authors

  • Aezam Katoonizadeh,

    Corresponding author
    1. Liver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
    • Correspondence

      Dr Aezam Katoonizadeh

      Liver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Center

      Tehran University of Medical Sciences

      North Kargar Ave., Shariati Hospital

      Tehran 14117-13135, Iran

      Tel: +98 21 82415229

      Fax: +98 21 82415400

      e-mail: azkatoonizadeh@yahoo.com

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  • Hossein Poustchi,

    1. Liver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
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  • Reza Malekzadeh

    1. Liver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
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Abstract

When there is a massive loss of hepatocytes and/or an inhibition in the proliferative capacity of the mature hepatocytes, activation of a dormant cell population of resident hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) occurs. Depending on the type of liver damage HPCs generate new hepatocytes and biliary cells to repopulate the liver placing them as potential candidates for cell therapy in human liver failure. Liver injury specific mechanisms through which HPCs differentiate towards mature epithelial cell types are recently become understood. Such new insights will enable us not only to direct HPCs behaviour for therapeutic purposes, but also to develop clinically feasible methods for in vivo differentiation of other stem cell types towards functional hepatocytes. This review aimed to provide the current improved knowledge of the role of HPCs niche and its signals in directing the behaviour and fate of HPCs and to translate this basic knowledge of HPCs activation/differentiation into its clinical applications.

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