Two new eucrite breccias from Northwest Africa

Authors

  • Sheryl A. SINGERLING,

    Corresponding author
    1. Planetary Geosciences Institute, Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1410, USA
      Corresponding author. E-mail: singerlings@si.edu
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  • Aubrey L. MODI,

    1. Planetary Geosciences Institute, Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1410, USA
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  • Blake MCFERRIN,

    1. Planetary Geosciences Institute, Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1410, USA
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  • Emily A. WORSHAM,

    1. Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
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  • Harry Y. MCSWEEN JR.,

    1. Planetary Geosciences Institute, Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1410, USA
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  • Douglas RUMBLE III,

    1. Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution for Science, Washington, DC 20015, USA
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  • Ryoji TANAKA,

    1. The Pheasant Memorial Laboratory, Institute for Study of the Earth’s Interior, Okayama University, Misasa, Tottori, 682-0193, JAPAN
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  • Lawrence A. TAYLOR

    1. Planetary Geosciences Institute, Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1410, USA
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Corresponding author. E-mail: singerlings@si.edu

Abstract

Abstract– This work describes two newly discovered eucrite breccias: three presumably paired meteorites, all named Northwest Africa (NWA) 6105, and NWA 6106. For each meteorite, major- and minor-element compositions of minerals were determined using the electron microprobe. Pyroxene Fe-Mn co-variations and bulk-rock oxygen isotope compositions confirm their classification as eucrites. Variations in mineral compositions and textures are attributed to differences in clast types present (i.e., basaltic or cumulate eucrite). The pyroxene compositions support the hypothesis that samples NWA 6105,1; 6105,2; and 6105,3 are paired polymict eucritic breccias, whereas sample NWA 6106 is a monomict basaltic eucritic breccia. Two-pyroxene geothermometry yields temperatures too low for igneous crystallization. The variation in temperatures among samples suggests that metamorphism occurred prior to brecciation.

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