The role of protostellar jets in star formation and the evolution of the early solar system: Astrophysical and meteoritical perspectives

Authors

  • Raquel SALMERON,

    Corresponding author
    1. Research School of Astronomy & Astrophysics and Planetary Science Institute, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    2. Research School of Earth Sciences and Planetary Science Institute, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
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  • Trevor IRELAND

    1. Research School of Earth Sciences and Planetary Science Institute, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
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Corresponding author. E-mail: raquel@mso.anu.edu.au

Abstract

Abstract– The rock record from the early solar system indicates high-temperature thermal processing sufficient to melt refractory oxides and silicates. The astrophysical context for the formation and evolution of our solar system, from a molecular cloud to a “clean” planetary system, is difficult to constrain tightly because of the large scales and lack of resolution of astronomical observations. Protostellar jets and winds, commonly associated with forming stars, are likely to play a role in heating and redistribution of the processed material in the solar system. We have recently proposed that disk-winds can cause melting of small inclusions to distances out to several AU. Particularly energetic outbursts, such as the FU-Orionis and EXor events, occur over relatively short time scales (approximately 100 and 1 yr, respectively), and are probably events related to formation of the refractory solids present in primitive meteorites.

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