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Microbial Biotechnology

Cover image for Vol. 6 Issue 1

January 2013

Volume 6, Issue 1

Pages i–ii, 1–86

  1. Issue information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. Editorial
    4. Crystal Ball
    5. Minireview
    6. Research articles
    7. Brief report
    8. Web alert
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      Issue information (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12030

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. Editorial
    4. Crystal Ball
    5. Minireview
    6. Research articles
    7. Brief report
    8. Web alert
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Microbial Biotechnology: evolution of your premier journal (pages 1–2)

      Ken Timmis, Juan Luis Ramos, Marty Rosenberg, Willy Verstraete and Willem de Vos

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12009

  3. Crystal Ball

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. Editorial
    4. Crystal Ball
    5. Minireview
    6. Research articles
    7. Brief report
    8. Web alert
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      Crystal ball – 2013 (pages 3–16)

      Tom Curtis, Jean-Marc Daran, Jack T. Pronk, Joachim Frey, Janet K. Jansson, Adam Robbins-Pianka, Rob Knight, Anna Schnürer, Barth F. Smets, E. J. Smid, T. Abee, Miguel Vicente and Karsten Zengler

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12014

  4. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. Editorial
    4. Crystal Ball
    5. Minireview
    6. Research articles
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    8. Web alert
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      Evolution of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins insecticidal activity (pages 17–26)

      Alejandra Bravo, Isabel Gómez, Helena Porta, Blanca Ines García-Gómez, Claudia Rodriguez-Almazan, Liliana Pardo and Mario Soberón

      Version of Record online: 29 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1751-7915.2012.00342.x

  5. Research articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. Editorial
    4. Crystal Ball
    5. Minireview
    6. Research articles
    7. Brief report
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      Recognition of a core fragment ofBeauveria bassiana hydrophobin gene promoter (Phyd1) and its special use in improving fungal biocontrol potential (pages 27–35)

      Zheng-Liang Wang, Sheng-Hua Ying and Ming-Guang Feng

      Version of Record online: 28 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1751-7915.2012.00351.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A homologous promoter was optimized to drive heterologous eGFP overexpression specifically in the conidia of Beauveria bassiana. Extraordinarily high expression of Vip3A toxin was achieved in transgenic conidia under the promoter control. The transgenic conidia, upon ingestion, killed all instars of foliage-devouring caterpillars at economic spray rates.

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      Bacterial diversity in the rhizosphere of maize and the surrounding carbonate-rich bulk soil (pages 36–44)

      Adela García-Salamanca, M. Antonia Molina-Henares, Pieter van Dillewijn, Jennifer Solano, Paloma Pizarro-Tobías, Amalia Roca, Estrella Duque and Juan L. Ramos

      Version of Record online: 6 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1751-7915.2012.00358.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Maize is the most widely grown grain crop in the world. Maize yields are influenced by the physicochemical properties of the soil and climate conditions. We have analysed microbial diversity in the rhizosphere and bulk soil of maize plants and have found that the number of microbes per gram of soil increases in the rhizosphere, whereas biodiversity in terms of phyla tends to decrease. Gammaproteobacteria of the genus Pseudomonas and Lysobacter were the predominant species found in rhizosphere soil.

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      Modelling biofilm-induced formation damage and biocide treatment in subsurface geosystems (pages 53–66)

      C. C. Ezeuko, A. Sen and I. D. Gates

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12002

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We present a mathematical modeling and evaluation of biofilm tolerance to biocide treatments under flow conditions in the subsurface, using digital, interconnected porous media. The presence of persister cells is primary to the inability of biocide treatments to halt biofilm-induced formation damage.

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      Transcriptional and functional characterization of genetic elements involved in galacto-oligosaccharide utilization by Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 (pages 67–79)

      Mary O'Connell Motherway, Michael Kinsella, Gerald F. Fitzgerald and Douwe van Sinderen

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12011

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this study we describe the identification and functional characterisation of the genetic loci responsible for the transport and metabolism of purified galacto-oligosaccharides (PGOS) by B. breve UCC2003. We further demonstrate that an extracellular endogalactanase specified by several B. breve strains, including B. breve UCC2003, is essential for partial degradation of PGOS components with a high degree of polymerisation. These partially hydrolyzed PGOS components are presumed to be transported into the bifidobacterial cell via various ABC transport systems and sugar permeases where they are further degraded to galactose and glucose monomers that feed into the bifid shunt. This work significantly advances our molecular understanding of bifidobacterial PGOS metabolism and its associated genetic machinery to utilize this prebiotic.

  6. Brief report

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. Editorial
    4. Crystal Ball
    5. Minireview
    6. Research articles
    7. Brief report
    8. Web alert
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      Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in a wetland constructed for benzene-, methyl tert-butyl ether- and ammonia-contaminated groundwater bioremediation (pages 80–84)

      Thomas Fester

      Version of Record online: 31 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1751-7915.2012.00357.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, mutualistic microorganisms supporting plant growth under conditions of stress, have been observed in a phytoremediation system for the detoxification of contaminated groundwater. Molecular analysis revealed the presence of molecular operational taxonomic units closely related to the generalist strains Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus irregularis demonstrating the ability of such strains to establish spontaneously, rapidly and extensively under unfavourable conditions.

  7. Web alert

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial
    4. Crystal Ball
    5. Minireview
    6. Research articles
    7. Brief report
    8. Web alert
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