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Microbial Biotechnology

Cover image for Vol. 6 Issue 6

Thematic Issue on Biomaterials

November 2013

Volume 6, Issue 6

Pages i–iii, 614–741

  1. Issue information

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      Issue information (pages i–iii)

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12093

  2. Opinion

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      Current knowledge on the Ralstonia solanacearum type III secretion system (pages 614–620)

      Núria S. Coll and Marc Valls

      Version of Record online: 26 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12056

      This article exhaustively reviews current knowledge on the type III as the main virulence determinant of R. solanacearum. Recent findings on this topic are interpreted in the plant-pathogen research context and future research directions are proposed.

  3. Minireviews

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      Microbial production of lactate-containing polyesters (pages 621–636)

      Jung Eun Yang, So Young Choi, Jae Ho Shin, Si Jae Park and Sang Yup Lee

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12066

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      Poly(lactic acid), PLA, has been one of the most attractive bio-based polymers and is currently produced by two-step process of fermentative lactic acid production followed by chemical polymerization. Recently, metabolic engineering allowed development of microbial strains capable of producing PLA and lactate-containing polyesters by one-step fermentation. This paper reviews the current state-of-the-art of lactate-containing poyesters and provides future perspectives.

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      Microbial alginate production, modification and its applications (pages 637–650)

      Iain D. Hay, Zahid Ur Rehman, M. Fata Moradali, Yajie Wang and Bernd H. A. Rehm

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12076

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      Alginates are exopolysaccharides composed of mannuronic and guluronic acid residues with unique material properties and which are produced by the two bacterial genera Pseudomonas and Azotobacter. While the intracellular biosynthesis of the activated precursor GDP-mannuronic acid is well understood, the molecular mechanisms of polymerisation and secretion of alginate remain unclear. Recently, it was established that a multiprotein complex spanning the entire bacterial envelope is required for these final steps in alginate production.

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      Recombinant DNA production of spider silk proteins (pages 651–663)

      Olena Tokareva, Valquíria A. Michalczechen-Lacerda, Elíbio L. Rech and David L. Kaplan

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12081

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      Silks exhibit strength and elasticity and are biocompatible and biodegradable protein–based materials. Recent advances in genetic engineering make it possible to produce recombinant silks in heterologous hosts, opening up opportunities for large scale production of recombinant silks for various biomedical and materials science applications. This topic is reviewed in the present paper.

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      Microbial production and chemical transformation of poly-γ-glutamate (pages 664–674)

      Makoto Ashiuchi

      Version of Record online: 15 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12072

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      This review focuses on the occurrence and physiology of PGA (as a basis for obtaining a better understanding of its microbial production), polymer synthesis and localization (toward the creation and designing of genetically-engineered mass-producers of PGA), potential applications (for bioremediation, functional food ingredients, health care, pharmaceutics, advanced biochemistry, etc.) and its chemical transformation (toward the development of feasible bio-nylons).

  4. Research articles

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      Engineering of recombinant Escherichia coli cells co-expressing poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) synthetase and glutamate racemase for differential yielding of γ-PGA (pages 675–684)

      Mingfeng Cao, Weitao Geng, Wei Zhang, Jibin Sun, Shufang Wang, Jun Feng, Ping Zheng, Anna Jiang and Cunjiang Song

      Version of Record online: 6 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12075

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      The pgsBCA and racE genes from different original Bacillus strains had been firstly cloned and expressed in E. coli strains. It showed that LL3 derived PgsBCA had higher catalytic activity and enhanced productivity than NK-03 and the supply of L-glutamate could be served as the ascendance upon γ-PGA production. RacE integration could enhance γ-PGA yield through improving the preferred D-glutamate content.

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      Glucose metabolic flux distribution of Lactobacillus amylophilus during lactic acid production using kitchen waste saccharified solution (pages 685–693)

      Jianguo Liu, Qunhui Wang, Hui Zou, Yingying Liu, Juan Wang, Kemin Gan and Juan Xiang

      Version of Record online: 14 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12046

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      The 13C isotope tracer method was used to investigate the glucose metabolic flux distribution and regulation in Lactobacillus amylophilus to improve lactic acid production using kitchen waste saccharified solution (KWSS); The addition of Fe3+ during fermentation enhanced the NADPH production efficiency and increased the NADH content. The flux to the EMP was also effectively increased.

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      Synthesis of ω-hydroxy dodecanoic acid based on an engineered CYP153A fusion construct (pages 694–707)

      Daniel Scheps, Sumire Honda Malca, Sven M. Richter, Karoline Marisch, Bettina M. Nestl and Bernhard Hauer

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12073

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      We reported the construction of a catalytically active self-sufficient fusion protein (CYP153AM. aq.-CPRBM3) for efficient electron coupling and optimal expression in E. coli. The established biocatalytic system was used for the production of selective ω-hydroxylation of dodecanoic acid in shaking flasks. In a two-phase bioreactor-system using dodecanoic acid methyl ester as substrate and the additionally expressed transporter (AlkL) 4 g/L ω-hydroxy dodecanoic acid could be produced with non-engineered E. coli resting cells.

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      Proteome turnover in bacteria: current status for Corynebacterium glutamicum and related bacteria (pages 708–719)

      Christian Trötschel, Stefan P. Albaum and Ansgar Poetsch

      Version of Record online: 20 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12035

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      Proteome turnover in bacteria is reviewed for Corynebacterium glutamicum and related bacteria. The technical solutions are covered on the mass spectrometry and bioinformatics level. Case studies are presented that demonstrate the potential of this approach to understand bacterial physiology.

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      Potential role of oxidative exoenzymes of the extremophilic fungus Pestalotiopsis palmarum BM-04 in biotransformation of extra-heavy crude oil (pages 720–730)

      Leopoldo Naranjo-Briceño, Beatriz Pernía, Mayamaru Guerra, Jhonny R. Demey, Ángela De Sisto, Ysvic Inojosa, Meralys González, Emidio Fusella, Miguel Freites and Francisco Yegres

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12067

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      Oxidative exoenzymes (OE) of the lignin-degrading enzyme system (LDS) of fungi catalyze the oxidation of a wide range of toxic pollutants. However, very little evidences on fungal degradation or biotransformation of extra-heavy crude oil (EHCO) have been reported. The aims of this work were to study the ability of Pestalotiopsis palmarum BM-04 to synthesize OE, its potential to biotransform EHCO and to survive in extreme environmental conditions. Enzymatic studies of the LDS showed the ability of this fungus to overproduce high amounts of laccase (LACp) or lignin peroxidase (LIPp) in presence of wheat bran or EHCO as sole carbon and energy source, respectively. FT-IR-ATR spectroscopy analysis showed the enzymatic oxidation of carbon and sulfur atoms in both maltenes and asphaltenes fractions of biotreated EHCO. Tolerance assays showed the ability of this fungus to grow up to 50000 ppm of EHCO and 2000 mM of NaCl. These results suggest that P. palmarum BM-04 is a hopeful alternative to be used in remediation processes in extreme environmental conditions of salinity and EHCO-contamination.

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      The prevalence of the honeybee brood pathogens Ascosphaera apis, Paenibacillus larvae and Melissococcus plutonius in Spanish apiaries determined with a new multiplex PCR assay (pages 731–739)

      Encarna Garrido-Bailón, Mariano Higes, Amparo Martínez-Salvador, Karina Antúnez, Cristina Botías, Aránzazu Meana, Lourdes Prieto and Raquel Martín-Hernández

      Version of Record online: 6 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12070

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      A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to simultaneously amplify the16S rRNA gene of Paenibacillus larvae and Melissococus plutonius, and the 5.8S rRNA gene of Ascosphaera apis, the main honey bee brood pathogens. The results of our transverse study revealed a low prevalence of honeybee brood pathogens in Spain in 2006 and 2007. The detection of infectious pathogens in honey bee brood samples without symptoms clearly demonstrates that they are not exclusively present in larvae that exhibit clinical signs of infection.

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    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information
    3. Opinion
    4. Minireviews
    5. Research articles
    6. Web alert
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article

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