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Microbial Biotechnology

Cover image for Vol. 10 Issue 5

Special Issue: The contribution of microbial biotechnology to sustainable development goals

September 2017

Volume 10, Issue 5

Pages 979–1274

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Table of Contents
    4. Editorials
    5. Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
    6. Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
    7. Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
    8. Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
    9. Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
    10. Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
    11. Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
    12. Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
    13. Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
    14. Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
    15. Enabling Technologies of microbial approaches towards attainment of sustainable development goals
    1. You have full text access to this Open Access content
      Issue Information (pages 979–980)

      Version of Record online: 22 SEP 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12418

  2. Table of Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Table of Contents
    4. Editorials
    5. Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
    6. Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
    7. Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
    8. Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
    9. Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
    10. Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
    11. Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
    12. Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
    13. Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
    14. Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
    15. Enabling Technologies of microbial approaches towards attainment of sustainable development goals
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
  3. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Table of Contents
    4. Editorials
    5. Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
    6. Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
    7. Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
    8. Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
    9. Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
    10. Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
    11. Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
    12. Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
    13. Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
    14. Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
    15. Enabling Technologies of microbial approaches towards attainment of sustainable development goals
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The contribution of microbial biotechnology to sustainable development goals (pages 984–987)

      Kenneth Timmis, Willem M. de Vos, Juan Luis Ramos, Siegfried E. Vlaeminck, Auxiliadora Prieto, Antoine Danchin, Willy Verstraete, Victor de Lorenzo, Sang Yup Lee, Harald Brüssow, James Kenneth Timmis and Brajesh K. Singh

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12818

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      The signature and almost unique characteristic of microbial technology is the exceptional diversity of applications it can address, and the exceptional range of human activities and needs to which it is and can be applied. Precisely because sustainability goals have very diverse and complex components and requirements, microbial technology has the ability to contribute substantively on many levels in many arenas to global efforts to achieve sustainability. Indeed, microbial technology could be viewed as a unifying element in our progress towards sustainability.

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      Microbial technology with major potentials for the urgent environmental needs of the next decades (pages 988–994)

      Willy Verstraete and Jo De Vrieze

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12779

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Schematic overview of specific global threats of the coming decades and concomitant potential microbial solutions.

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      Seven microbial bio-processes to help the planet (pages 995–998)

      Víctor de Lorenzo

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12816

      There is a number of global environmental problems that could be tackled through advanced Microbial Biotechnology.

  4. Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Table of Contents
    4. Editorials
    5. Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
    6. Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
    7. Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
    8. Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
    9. Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
    10. Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
    11. Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
    12. Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
    13. Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
    14. Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
    15. Enabling Technologies of microbial approaches towards attainment of sustainable development goals
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Tiny Microbes, Big Yields: enhancing food crop production with biological solutions (pages 999–1003)

      Pankaj Trivedi, Peer M. Schenk, Matthew D. Wallenstein and Brajesh K. Singh

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12804

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      Emerging microbiome approaches potentially can significantly increase farm productivity and hence can contribute to meet several sustainable development goals.

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      Increased nutritional value in food crops (pages 1004–1007)

      Nieves Goicoechea and M. Carmen Antolín

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12764

      This paper summarizes the state of the art, the current difficulties associated to the use of rhizospheric microorganisms as enhancers of the nutritional quality of food crops as well as the future prospects in the context of the Goal 2 of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development of the United Nations: ‘End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture'.

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      Beneficial microbial signals from alternative feed ingredients: a way to improve sustainability of broiler production? (pages 1008–1011)

      Filip Van Immerseel, Venessa Eeckhaut, Robert J. Moore, Mingan Choct and Richard Ducatelle

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12794

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      Biofloc technology application in aquaculture to support sustainable development goals (pages 1012–1016)

      Peter Bossier and Julie Ekasari

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12836

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      Biofloc enhances nutrient recover in aquaculture. Biofloc can be integrated in multitrophic aquaculture. biofloc enhance disease resistance.

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      Microalgae, old sustainable food and fashion nutraceuticals (pages 1017–1024)

      José L. García, Marta de Vicente and Beatriz Galán

      Version of Record online: 15 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12800

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      Microalgae have been used for centuries to provide nourishment to humans and animals, only very recently they have become much more widely cultured and harvested at large industrial scale. This paper reviews the potential health benefits and nutrition provided by microalgae whose benefits are contributing to expand their market. We also point out several key challenges that remain to be addressed in this field.

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      Hunger and microbiology: is a low gastric acid-induced bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine a contributor to malnutrition in developing countries? (pages 1025–1030)

      Shafiqul A. Sarker, Tahmeed Ahmed and Harald Brüssow

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12780

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      Underproduction of hydrochloric acid into the stomach is frequently encountered in subjects from developing countries. Hypochlorhydria compromises the gastric barrier, favors bacterial overgrowth in the proximal parts of the small intestine and might thus deviate food calories into bacterial metabolism contributing to childhood malnutrition.

  5. Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Table of Contents
    4. Editorials
    5. Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
    6. Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
    7. Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
    8. Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
    9. Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
    10. Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
    11. Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
    12. Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
    13. Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
    14. Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
    15. Enabling Technologies of microbial approaches towards attainment of sustainable development goals
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Microbially derived biosensors for diagnosis, monitoring and epidemiology (pages 1031–1035)

      Hung-Ju Chang, Peter L. Voyvodic, Ana Zúñiga and Jérôme Bonnet

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12791

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      Living cells have evolved to detect and process various signals and can self-replicate, presenting an attractive platform for engineering scalable and affordable biosensing devices. Here we review the applications of microbial-derived biosensors to environmental monitoring and healthcare applications. We also discuss the challenges to address in order to accelerate the transition of these technologies into real-world applications.

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      Roads to advanced vaccines: influenza case study (pages 1036–1040)

      Peggy Riese and Carlos A. Guzmán

      Version of Record online: 15 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12835

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      Infection therapy: the problem of drug resistance – and possible solutions (pages 1041–1046)

      Harald Brüssow

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12777

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      The rising antibiotic resistance in major bacterial pathogens together with the breakdown of the antibiotic discovery platform creates a critical situation for infection therapy. Recent developments reviving new antibiotic discovery from defining chemical rules for membrane-passing compounds to isolation chips for soil bacteria and exploring the human microbiome for antibiotic-producing bacteria are discussed. The potential of bacteriocins, tailocins, phage lysins, phages, probiotics and commensal blends as alternatives to antibiotics are evaluated. Chemical formula are from Wikipedia (public domain) and microscopies from publications of the author (Microbe 2:341 (2007) and Curr Opin Microbiol 6:417 (2003)).

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      Microbial approaches for targeting antibiotic-resistant bacteria (pages 1047–1053)

      Wing Fei Wong and Marina Santiago

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12783

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The human microbiome contains bacteriophage and commensal bacteria that provide resistance to colonization by antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. Identifying these mechanisms of colonization resistance will help us develop microbial therapeutics that can eliminate antibiotic resistant bacterial from the gastrointestinal tract.

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      Strategies for combating persister cell and biofilm infections (pages 1054–1056)

      Thomas K. Wood

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12774

      Bacterial cells are constantly exposed to environmental stress; for example, almost all cells must endure starvation, and antimicrobials, of course, are administered to kill bacteria. These stressed cells enter a resting state known as persistence in which they become tolerant to nearly all antibiotics without undergoing genetic change. These dormant cells survive courses of antibiotics, since antibiotics are most effective against actively-metabolizing cells, and reconstitute infections. In humans, most of these bacterial infections occur in biofilms in which bacteria attach to one another via secreted proteins, polysaccharides, and even DNA. Herein, biotechnological methods are described to combat persister cells and to eradicate biofilms by understanding the genetic basis of both phenomena.

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      Sustainable therapies by engineered bacteria (pages 1057–1061)

      Beatriz Álvarez and Luis Ángel Fernández

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12778

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      The controlled in situ delivery of biologics (e.g. enzymes, cytokines, antibodies) by engineered bacteria of our microbiome will allow the sustainable production of these complex and expensive drugs locally in the human body, overcoming many of the technical and economical barriers currently associated with the global use of these potent medicines.

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      Metal-based antimicrobial strategies (pages 1062–1065)

      Raymond J. Turner

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12785

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      Synbiotic approaches to human health and well-being (pages 1070–1073)

      Thomas Gurry

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12789

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      Synbiotics refer to combinations of probiotics and associated prebiotics that act synergistically to confer health benefits to the host. As a therapeutic tool for rational engineering of the composition and metabolic output of a subject's gut microbiota, they have the potential to strengthen existing prophylactic measures aiming to prevent a number of conditions, including infant diarrhoea, inflammatory bowel diseases and metabolic diseases, with important ramifications for sustainable development.

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      Tumour-targeting bacteria-based cancer therapies for increased specificity and improved outcome (pages 1074–1078)

      Sebastian Felgner, Vinay Pawar, Dino Kocijancic, Marc Erhardt and Siegfried Weiss

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12787

      ‘You have cancer’ – a devastating diagnosis that still strikes patients hard. Despite substantial improvements of standard therapies over the years, there is still no general cure available. Here, we review the revival of an old concept – the use of bacteria as cancer therapeutics. Bacteria-mediated tumor therapy has great potential to evolve into a powerful tool against malignant solid tumors.

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      Hygiene: microbial strategies to reduce pathogens and drug resistance in clinical settings (pages 1079–1083)

      Elisabetta Caselli

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12755

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ensuring a healthy environment during hospitalization is a crucial goal, since hospital acquired infections are a global concern. Chemical disinfectants show limitations in controlling pathogens contamination on hospital surfaces, and can select resistant strains. Innovative microbial-based cleaning was shown more efficient in decreasing pathogens presence and their drug resistance, and might thus represent a valid and sustainable choice.

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      The DIY Digital Medical Centre (pages 1084–1093)

      James Kenneth Timmis and Kenneth Timmis

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12817

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      The DIY Digital Medical Centre.

  6. Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Table of Contents
    4. Editorials
    5. Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
    6. Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
    7. Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
    8. Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
    9. Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
    10. Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
    11. Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
    12. Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
    13. Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
    14. Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
    15. Enabling Technologies of microbial approaches towards attainment of sustainable development goals
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Microbial biotechnologies for potable water production (pages 1094–1097)

      S. Jane Fowler and Barth F. Smets

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12837

      Sustainable Development Goal 6 requires the provision of safe drinking water to the world. We propose that increased exploitation of biological processes is fundamental to achieving this goal due to their low economic and energetic costs. Biological processes exist for the removal of most common contaminants, and biofiltration processes can establish a biologically stable product that retains high quality in distribution networks, minimizing opportunities for pathogen invasion.

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  7. Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Table of Contents
    4. Editorials
    5. Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
    6. Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
    7. Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
    8. Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
    9. Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
    10. Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
    11. Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
    12. Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
    13. Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
    14. Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
    15. Enabling Technologies of microbial approaches towards attainment of sustainable development goals
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Green biofuels and bioproducts: bases for sustainability analysis (pages 1111–1113)

      Juan L. Ramos, Francisco García-Lorente, Miguel Valdivia and Estrella Duque

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12768

      Currently the chemical industry is largely petroleum based and although the number of ongoing large-scale biocatalytic processes are relatively low, a trend in growth is expected and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and other agencies aim to have 30% of the total chemical industry based on renewable sources by 2050 (Philp et al., 2013). At present a good number of bio-based products (bioethanol, acids such as lactic, succinic, itaconic and others) are derived from corn syrup and other sugar sources (Geiser et al., 2016; Ramos et al., 2016a); however, because of the food v fuel controversy new trends have been directed towards the production of bioproducts/biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass—the most abundant and important renewable source for alternative petrol derivatives. We discuss here the bases for sustainable bioenergy production.

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      Advances and bottlenecks in microbial hydrogen production (pages 1120–1127)

      Alan J. Stephen, Sophie A. Archer, Rafael L. Orozco and Lynne E. Macaskie

      Version of Record online: 22 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12790

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biohydrogen production is best achieved by a combination of dark fermentation and photofermentation with the organic acid co-products of the former fed to the latter via electrodialytic separation. For organic acid waste streams a photofermentation gives a greater energy yield than by producing biogas.

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      Biogas (pages 1128–1130)

      Caroline M. Plugge

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12854

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      Fungal nanoscale metal carbonates and production of electrochemical materials (pages 1131–1136)

      Qianwei Li and Geoffrey Michael Gadd

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12765

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fungal biomineralization of carbonates results in metal removal from solution or immobilization within a solid matrix. Such a system provides a promising method for removal of toxic or valuable metals from solution, such as Co, Ni, and La, with some carbonates being of nanoscale dimensions. A fungal Mn carbonate biomineralization process can be applied for the synthesis of novel electrochemical materials.

  8. Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Table of Contents
    4. Editorials
    5. Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
    6. Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
    7. Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
    8. Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
    9. Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
    10. Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
    11. Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
    12. Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
    13. Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
    14. Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
    15. Enabling Technologies of microbial approaches towards attainment of sustainable development goals
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The contribution of microbial biotechnology to economic growth and employment creation (pages 1137–1144)

      Kenneth Timmis, Victor de Lorenzo, Willy Verstraete, Juan Luis Ramos, Antoine Danchin, Harald Brüssow, Brajesh K. Singh and James Kenneth Timmis

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12845

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      Our communication discusses the profound impact of bio-based economies – in particular microbial biotechnologies – on SDG 8: Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all. A bio-based economy provides significant potential for improving labour supply, education and investment, and thereby for substantially increasing the demographic dividend. This, in turn, improves the sustainable development of economies.

  9. Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Table of Contents
    4. Editorials
    5. Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
    6. Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
    7. Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
    8. Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
    9. Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
    10. Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
    11. Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
    12. Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
    13. Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
    14. Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
    15. Enabling Technologies of microbial approaches towards attainment of sustainable development goals
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Microbial biotechnology approaches to mitigating the deterioration of construction and heritage materials (pages 1145–1148)

      Pilar Junier and Edith Joseph

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12795

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By prolonging the lifecycle of construction materials, microbial biotechnology can contribute directly to make our cities more sustainable. In addition, given the societal importance of cultural heritage, microbial biotechnology can help to preserve an important component of human legacy. In the image examples of microbial colonization of inorganic substrates (top) or the biogenic formation of minerals (bottom) are presented.

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      Microbial communities as biosensors for monitoring urban environments (pages 1149–1151)

      Fangqiong Ling

      Version of Record online: 15 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12831

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The BE microbiome is a naturally embedded biosensor in urban infrastructure that can be used to monitor environmental quality and human activity. There are many potential opportunities for leveraging BE microbial communities to guide urban design and public health policy.

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      Bioprotection of the built environment and cultural heritage (pages 1152–1156)

      Geoffrey Michael Gadd and Thomas D. Dyer

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12750

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      The growth of microbial biofilms and various biomineralization phenomena can lead to the formation of stable layers and veneers on rocks known as ‘rock varnishes’ that can stabilize surfaces and protect from further weathering. This article describes the potential application of fungal systems for bioprotection of rock and mineral-based substrates and the evidence to support this concept of utilizing natural or engineered colonization and metabolic properties of fungi, including lichens.

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      Architects of nature: growing buildings with bacterial biofilms (pages 1157–1163)

      Martyn Dade-Robertson, Alona Keren-Paz, Meng Zhang and Ilana Kolodkin-Gal

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12833

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      Biofilms formed by soil bacteria evolved to deal with the challenges of carbon dioxide emissions from cellular respiration, and to self-renew following load stresses. Using Microbiology and Synthetic Biology we can now use the natural solutions bacteria found for the architectural “tool box” of the future.

  10. Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Table of Contents
    4. Editorials
    5. Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
    6. Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
    7. Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
    8. Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
    9. Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
    10. Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
    11. Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
    12. Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
    13. Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
    14. Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
    15. Enabling Technologies of microbial approaches towards attainment of sustainable development goals
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
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      Gas fermentation for commodity chemicals and fuels (pages 1167–1170)

      Frank R. Bengelsdorf and Peter Dürre

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12763

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      Gas fermentation is a microbial process that contributes to at least four of the sustainable development goals (SDGs) of the United Nations. The process converts waste and greenhouse gases into commodity chemicals and fuels. Thus, world's climate is positively affected. Briefly, we describe the background of the process, some biocatalytic strains, and legal implications.

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      Metallic bionanocatalysts: potential applications as green catalysts and energy materials (pages 1171–1180)

      Lynne E. Macaskie, Iryna P. Mikheenko, Jacob B. Omajai, Alan J. Stephen and Joseph Wood

      Version of Record online: 22 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12801

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      Bacteria can make metallic nanocatalysts, often from waste metal sources. Such bionanocatalysts can have applications in several areas of sustainable energy such as fuel cells, oil upgrading and production of ‘drop in’ fuels.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Bacterial cellulose as an example product for sustainable production and consumption (pages 1181–1185)

      Woo Dae Jang, Ji Hyeon Hwang, Hyun Uk Kim, Jae Yong Ryu and Sang Yup Lee

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12744

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      Life cycle of bacterial cellulose. Sustainable production and consumption of bio-based products are showcased using bacterial cellulose as an example.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Microbial melanins for radioprotection and bioremediation (pages 1186–1190)

      Radames J. B. Cordero, Raghav Vij and Arturo Casadevall

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12807

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      Melanotic microorganisms are useful in achieving a sustainable future as they provide a biocompatible and scalable source of melanins for radioprotection and bioremediation technologies.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Biomining of metals: how to access and exploit natural resource sustainably (pages 1191–1193)

      Carlos A. Jerez

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12792

      How to access and exploit natural resources sustainably by using biomining of metals.

    7. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Recovery of precious metals from waste streams (pages 1194–1198)

      Jing He and Andreas Kappler

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12759

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      As there is a high potential for microbe-based technologies to bring the recovery of metals from waste streams to an ecologically friendly and financially reasonable level, it is worth to invest efforts into the advancement of these biotechnologies in the future.

    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Metal and metalloid biorecovery using fungi (pages 1199–1205)

      Xinjin Liang and Geoffrey Michael Gadd

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12767

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      Bioleaching is a proven bioprocess for metal recovery by solution from solid matrices, while a bioprecipitation or biomineralization approach is of potential for biorecovery from solution. Fungi can directly and indirectly mediate the formation of many kinds of minerals, including oxides, phosphates, carbonates and oxalates, as well as elemental forms of metals and metalloids such as Ag, Se and Te. Fungal capabilities may offer a potentially useful contribution to biotechnological and physico-chemical methods for metal recovery.

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      How to access and exploit natural resources sustainably: petroleum biotechnology (pages 1206–1211)

      Angela Sherry, Luiza Andrade, Anne Velenturf, Beate Christgen, Neil D. Gray and Ian M. Head

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12793

      How to access and exploit natural resources sustainably: petroleum biotechnology.

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      The contribution of microbially produced nanoparticles to sustainable development goals (pages 1212–1215)

      Miguel E. Cueva and Louise E. Horsfall

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12788

      Nanoparticles are currently being synthesized through chemical and physical methods on an industrial scale. However, these methods of synthesis do not fit with sustainable development goals as they require high temperatures and/or pressures resulting in high energy consumption and the generation of large amounts of waste. In recent years, research into the synthesis of NPs has shifted to more green and biological methods, often using microorganisms.

  11. Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Table of Contents
    4. Editorials
    5. Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
    6. Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
    7. Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
    8. Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
    9. Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
    10. Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
    11. Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
    12. Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
    13. Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
    14. Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
    15. Enabling Technologies of microbial approaches towards attainment of sustainable development goals
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      About how to capture and exploit the CO2 surplus that nature, per se, is not capable of fixing (pages 1216–1225)

      Manuel S. Godoy, Beatrice Mongili, Debora Fino and M. Auxiliadora Prieto

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12805

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      The tremendous impacts of global warming are being felt all over the world due to humans unsustainable way of life. We have released to the atmosphere more CO2 than what Nature has been capable of fixing. Different approaches are being implemented to diminish this environmental problem. In this study we aim to update the most promising biotechnological approaches to capture and exploit excess of CO2 to accomplish human beings quality of life integrated to the sustainability of our planet.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Harnessing microbiome-based biotechnologies for sustainable mitigation of nitrous oxide emissions (pages 1226–1231)

      Hang-Wei Hu, Ji-Zheng He and Brajesh K. Singh

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12758

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      This article assesses the likely contribution of microbial biotechnology to the mitigation of N2O emissions and discusses how to facilitate the development of environmental-friendly microbiome-based biotechnology for sustainable climate change mitigation.

  12. Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Table of Contents
    4. Editorials
    5. Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
    6. Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
    7. Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
    8. Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
    9. Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
    10. Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
    11. Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
    12. Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
    13. Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
    14. Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
    15. Enabling Technologies of microbial approaches towards attainment of sustainable development goals
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Microbial biotechnology addressing the plastic waste disaster (pages 1232–1235)

      Tanja Narancic and Kevin E. O'Connor

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12775

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      Oceans are a major source of biodiversity, they provide livelihood, and regulate the global ecosystem by absorbing heat and CO2. However, they are highly polluted with plastic waste. We are discussing here microbial biotechnology advances with the view to improve the start and the end of life of biodegradable polymers, which could contribute to the sustainable use of marine and coastal ecosystems (UN Sustainability development goal 14).

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The contribution of microbial biotechnology to mitigating coral reef degradation (pages 1236–1243)

      Katarina Damjanovic, Linda L. Blackall, Nicole S. Webster and Madeleine J. H. van Oppen

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12769

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      The decline of coral reefs due to anthropogenic disturbances is having devastating impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem services. Here we highlight the potential and challenges of microbial manipulation strategies to enhance coral tolerance to stress and contribute to coral reef restoration and protection.

  13. Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Table of Contents
    4. Editorials
    5. Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
    6. Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
    7. Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
    8. Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
    9. Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
    10. Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
    11. Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
    12. Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
    13. Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
    14. Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
    15. Enabling Technologies of microbial approaches towards attainment of sustainable development goals
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Soil and brownfield bioremediation (pages 1244–1249)

      Mallavarapu Megharaj and Ravi Naidu

      Version of Record online: 22 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12840

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      This article presents a brief overview of bioremediation technologies in the context of sustainability, their applications and limitations in the reclamation of contaminated sites.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Microbial biotechnology as a tool to restore degraded drylands (pages 1250–1253)

      Fernando T. Maestre, Ricard Solé and Brajesh K. Singh

      Version of Record online: 22 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12832

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      We briefly review how microbial biotechnology can contribute to improve activities aiming to restore degraded drylands and to combat their desertification, which are an integral part of the Sustainable Development Goal 15 of the 2030 Agenda. Microbial biotechnology offers notable promise to improve restoration actions based on the use of biocrust-forming engineered cyanobacteria, which play key roles in maintaining ecosystem structure and functioning in drylands worldwide. Advances in our understanding of microbiome associated to biocrusts, and of the signaling involved in the communication among their constituents can also potentially enhance the outcome of restoration activities in drylands.

  14. Enabling Technologies of microbial approaches towards attainment of sustainable development goals

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Table of Contents
    4. Editorials
    5. Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
    6. Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
    7. Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
    8. Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
    9. Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
    10. Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
    11. Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
    12. Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
    13. Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
    14. Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
    15. Enabling Technologies of microbial approaches towards attainment of sustainable development goals
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Systems metabolic engineering as an enabling technology in accomplishing sustainable development goals (pages 1254–1258)

      Dongsoo Yang, Jae Sung Cho, Kyeong Rok Choi, Hyun Uk Kim and Sang Yup Lee

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12766

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Systems metabolic engineering can serve as an enabling technology to help achieving UN's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through improving the quality of life and protecting our environment.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The contribution of bacterial genome engineering to sustainable development (pages 1259–1263)

      Daniel R. Reuß, Fabian M. Commichau and Jörg Stülke

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12784

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      The United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals define important challenges for the prosperous development of mankind. To reach several of these goal, among them the production of value-added compounds, improved economic and ecologic balance of production processes, prevention of climate change and protection of ecosystems, the use of engineered bacteria can make valuable contributions. We discuss the strategies for genome engineering and how they can be applied to meet the United Nations’ goals for sustainable development.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Bioprocess scale-up/down as integrative enabling technology: from fluid mechanics to systems biology and beyond (pages 1267–1274)

      Frank Delvigne, Ralf Takors, Rob Mudde, Walter van Gulik and Henk Noorman

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1751-7915.12803

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      Efficient scale-up of microbial processes is a critical issue for achieving a number of sustainable development goals For that purpose, a full scale-up/down computational framework is already available This framework still needs some refinements, such as a better integration of gas-liquid flows in CFD, and taking into account intrinsic biological noise in ABM.

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