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A multi-genome analysis approach enables tracking of the invasion of a single Russian wheat aphid (Diuraphis noxia) clone throughout the New World

Authors

  • B. Zhang,

    1. Science & Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld, Australia
    2. State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
    3. State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China
    4. Cooperative Research Centre for National Plant Biosecurity, Bruce, ACT, Australia
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  • O. Edwards,

    1. Cooperative Research Centre for National Plant Biosecurity, Bruce, ACT, Australia
    2. CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, Centre for Environment and Life Sciences, Floreat, WA, Australia
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  • L. Kang,

    Corresponding author
    1. State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
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  • S. Fuller

    1. Science & Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld, Australia
    2. Cooperative Research Centre for National Plant Biosecurity, Bruce, ACT, Australia
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Abstract

This study investigated the population genetics, demographic history and pathway of invasion of the Russian wheat aphid (RWA) from its native range in Central Asia, the Middle East and Europe to South Africa and the Americas. We screened microsatellite markers, mitochondrial DNA and endosymbiont genes in 504 RWA clones from nineteen populations worldwide. Following pathway analyses of microsatellite and endosymbiont data, we postulate that Turkey and Syria were the most likely sources of invasion to Kenya and South Africa, respectively. Furthermore, we found that one clone transferred between South Africa and the Americas was most likely responsible for the New World invasion. Finally, endosymbiont DNA was found to be a high-resolution population genetic marker, extremely useful for studies of invasion over a relatively short evolutionary history time frame. This study has provided valuable insights into the factors that may have facilitated the recent global invasion by this damaging pest.

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