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Yukiko Asada is an associate professor in the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology at Dalhousie University. She holds a PhD in population health from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and is a recipient of a Canadian Institutes of Health Research New Investigator Award. Her research focuses on the intersection of population health, health services research, and ethics, and she has worked in areas of health inequality and inequity, access to health care, and need-based resource allocation. Her book Health Inequality: Morality and Measurement (University of Toronto Press, 2007) signifies her interdisciplinary approach to integrating ethics, methods, and policy.

Kristin Buterbaugh is a third-year medical student at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. She received an MPhil in the history and philosophy of science from the University of Cambridge on a Gates Cambridge Scholarship. She earned a BA in American studies from Northwestern University. Her research interests include the history of medical innovation, modern medical technologies, and health policy.

Carolyn M. Clancy was appointed director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) in 2003. She is a general internist and health services researcher. Clancy holds an academic appointment at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences and serves as senior associate editor for Health Services Research. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a master of the American College of Physicians. In 2009, she was awarded the William B. Graham Prize for Health Services Research. Clancy's major research interests include improving health care quality and patient safety and reducing disparities in care. As director of AHRQ, she launched the first annual report to Congress on health care disparities and health care quality. Clancy holds an MD.

Richard Coker is professor of public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM). He heads the Communicable Diseases Policy Research Group (www.cdprg.org), based both at LSHTM and at the Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University in Bangkok, which provides expertise on the diverse public health problems associated with communicable disease control internationally. The Group's research interests include communicable diseases, emerging infectious diseases, health systems analysis, analysis of strategic planning, the use of law as a tool to support communicable disease control, policy analysis, and the development and ranking of indicators to assess the performance of health systems. Coker's work in recent years has focused principally on health systems responses to communicable diseases in Southeast Asia.

Colin M. Fischbacher is a consultant in public health medicine in the Information Services Division of NHS National Services Scotland and honorary clinical senior lecturer at the University of Edinburgh and the University of London. He qualified in medicine from the University of Edinburgh in 1979 and has worked in the UK, Kenya, and Malawi in medicine and public health. His research interests are in diabetes, ethnic minority health, and the use of data linkage methods. He is a fellow of the UK's Faculty of Public Health and of the Royal College of Physicians.

John W. Frank trained in medicine/community medicine at the University of Toronto, family medicine at McMaster University, and epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He has been professor (now emeritus) of public health at the University of Toronto (1983–), founding director of research at the Institute for Work and Health in Toronto (1991–1997), and inaugural scientific director of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Institute of Population and Public Health (2000–2008). In 2008, he became director of a new Edinburgh-based unit, funded by the Medical Research Council and the Scottish Chief Scientist Office: the Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research and Policy. It develops and tests novel public health policies and programs to equitably improve health status in Scotland through the convening and ongoing support of researcher/research-user consortia.

Sam Harper is an assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health at McGill University. His current research interests are in population health and demography, global health, measuring and monitoring health inequalities, and public health ethics. He holds a PhD.

Sally Haw is professor of public health and population health at the University of Stirling. She studied psychology at the University of Aberdeen and then worked in substance misuse research until the mid-1990s. After working as a research and development coordinator with the National Health Service (NHS) in England, she returned to Scotland in 1997 to take up a post with the Health Education Board for Scotland, later to become NHS Health Scotland, working at the interface between research and public health policy development. In 2008, she was seconded to the Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research and Policy to support the development of the new unit. A major part of her recent work has been in tobacco control, leading the national evaluation of Scotland's smoke-free legislation.

Nicholas B. King is an assistant professor in the Department of Social Studies in Medicine and an associate member in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health at McGill University, as well as an adjunct professor in the Department of Bioethics at Case Western Reserve University. He holds a doctorate in the history of science from Harvard University and was previously a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health and Society Scholar at the University of Michigan. His current research interests include the role of normative judgment in research on health inequalities and the aggregation of complex health information.

Alastair H. Leyland is a program leader at the MRC Social and Public Health Sciences Unit in Glasgow. His program of research—measuring health, variations in health, and the determinants of health—is core funded by the Chief Scientist Office and has a substantial focus on improving the understanding and measurement of inequalities in health. He holds a PhD in statistics, is a Chartered Statistician, a fellow of the UK's Faculty of Public Health, and an editor of the European Journal of Public Health.

Grant R. Martsolfholds a BS in nursing and a BS in economics from the University of Pennsylvania (School of Nursing and Wharton School, respectively), an MPH from the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, and a PhD from Penn State's Department of Health Policy and Administration. He is presently an associate health policy researcher at RAND. Prior to that he served in a variety of research and clinical roles at the Children's Hospital Colorado, the Advisory Board Company, and the Center for Health Care and Policy Research. He has performed research across a range of topical areas such as patient-centered medical homes, care coordination, performance measurement, and quality improvement.

Gerry McCartney is a consultant in public health and head of the public health observatory division at NHS Health Scotland. He works as part of the Scottish Public Health Observatory to help describe and explain trends in Scottish health outcomes with a view to improved public policy and practice. His main research interests are in the social, economic, and environmental influences on health and health inequalities. He holds an MD and an MFPH.

Grischa Metlay is currently a DeWitt Stetten Postdoctoral Fellow in the Office of History at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Before coming to NIH, he earned a doctoral degree in the history of science from Harvard University. The article published in this issue of The Milbank Quarterly is part of a broader book project on the history of scientific and medical efforts to control alcohol and drug abuse, which is under contract at the Johns Hopkins University Press.

Jessica N. Mittler is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Policy and Administration at Penn State. She studies how individual and organizational behaviors relate to quality and health outcomes, focusing on patient experiences, consumerism, and the relationships between patients, providers, and broader health care market factors. She is especially interested in the pursuit of patient-centered care and the transformation it requires for individuals and organizations. Her current work investigates whether particular physician-patient role relationships and patient preferences are associated with greater patient activation. Mittler earned her PhD in health policy and medical sociology from Harvard University in 2008, her master's degree in health services administration and public policy from the University of Michigan in 1997, and a BS in urban studies from Cornell University in 1994.

Ernest Moy is a medical officer in the Center for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. He leads the production of the annual National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Reports, which track the progress of the United States towards health care that is effective, safe, and equitable. Moy holds an MD and an MPH.

Marcel Perl graduated from Harvard College in 2009 with a BA in history and is currently in his third year at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He previously worked in basic science research on lupus at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

James W. Rudge is an overseas lecturer at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, based in Thailand as part of the Communicable Diseases Policy Research Group (http://www.cdprg.org/). His research focuses on the emergence and spread of infectious diseases in Southeast Asia, and the capacity of health systems to respond. He completed his PhD in infectious disease epidemiology, MSc in modern epidemiology, and BSc in microbiology, all at Imperial College London.

Bhaven N. Sampat is an economist by training and an associate professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at Columbia University. His work focuses on issues at the intersection of health policy and innovation policy. His current projects examine pharmaceutical patent policy in the United States and globally, the political economy of the National Institutes of Health, and serendipity in biomedical research. He holds a PhD.

Dennis P. Scanlon's research focuses on the intersection of quality measurement and transparency, competition in health insurance and health provider markets, public and private sector health care purchasing activities, and the impact of information and incentives in health care markets. He has led a federally funded research project examining the state of quality improvement activities at managed care plans, as well as projects studying the impact and cost-effectiveness of diabetes and disease management programs in Federally Qualified Health Centers. He is currently the principal investigator for the evaluation of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Aligning Forces for Quality initiative and of the Commonwealth Fund's State Action to Avoid Rehospitalizations Initiative. Scanlon also leads the doctoral program in the Department of Health Policy and Administration at Penn State. He holds a PhD.

Diane L. Stockton is co-lead of the Scottish Public Health Observatory and manager of the health improvement team within the Information Services Division of National Services Scotland. She has a PhD in cancer epidemiology and a particular interest in social inequalities. She has worked in the public health field for nine years and is on the General Medical Council specialist public health register.

Shannon J. Telenko holds an MEd in higher education administration from Peabody College at Vanderbilt University and an MA in public anthropology from American University. She is an academic adviser for Penn State World Campus and teaches an online introduction to a cultural anthropology course for Pennsylvania Highlands Community College. Prior to her current role, Telenko worked on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Aligning Forces for Quality initiative under Dr. Dennis Scanlon in the Center for Health Care and Policy Research and on the Family Life Project/Migration Study under Drs. Linda Burton and Sherri Lawson Clark in the Center for Family Research in Diverse Contexts, both within the College of Health and Human Development at Penn State.

David Walsh is a public health program manager at the Glasgow Centre for Population Health and a senior honorary lecturer at the University of Glasgow. Within the Centre he is involved in a wide range of research programs, including the “excess” mortality seen in Glasgow and Scotland compared to elsewhere in the UK, and comparisons of health and its determinants across post-industrial European regions. He has almost twenty years of experience within health service and public health research, including previous positions within the Information Services Division of National Services Scotland, NHS Health Scotland, the Public Health Institute of Scotland, and a number of different Scottish NHS boards. Walsh holds an MA and an MSc.

Samantha K. Watson is an overseas research fellow with the Communicable Diseases Research Group at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She is currently leading a study to appraise, model, and inform Indonesia's disaster readiness and response capabilities. Her broader research interests focus on the political economy of knowledge production, transnational policy transference, and the State, as expressed in historic shifts in global and local development agendas. These substantive interests are pursued alongside work on social science methodology and research methods. She holds a PhD.

Alyce Whipp is a research associate in the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology at Dalhousie University. She holds a master's degree in public health epidemiology with a concentration in public health genetics from the University of Michigan. Current research areas include health disparity measurement and cannabis and alcohol research.

Bruce Whyte is a public health program manager at the Glasgow Centre for Population Health. He is currently involved in a range of research activities: managing a program of breastfeeding research, analyzing active travel trends in Glasgow and Clyde Valley, and leading the development of indicators of progress on health and well-being for Glasgow, including the creation of the Understanding Glasgow web resource (www.understandingglasgow.com). He was a co-author of the Let Glasgow Flourish report (Glasgow Centre for Population Health, 2006), which provided a comprehensive overview of health trends and inequalities in Glasgow and the West of Scotland, and was the lead author of Still “The Sick Man of Europe”? (Glasgow Centre for Population Health, 2012), an analysis of Scottish mortality trends within a European context. Whyte holds a BSc and an MSc.

Yoko Yoshida is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology at Dalhousie University. She is also the co-academic director of the Atlantic Research Data Centre in Halifax, Canada. Her research interests include social statistics applied in the areas of socioeconomic inequality, inequity in health, and integration processes of immigrants. She holds a PhD in sociology from McGill University.