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The C-terminal linker of Escherichia coli FtsZ functions as an intrinsically disordered peptide

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Summary

The tubulin homologue FtsZ provides the cytoskeletal framework and constriction force for bacterial cell division. FtsZ has an ∼ 50-amino-acid (aa) linker between the protofilament-forming globular domain and the C-terminal (Ct) peptide that binds FtsA and ZipA, tethering FtsZ to the membrane. This Ct-linker is widely divergent across bacterial species and thought to be an intrinsically disordered peptide (IDP). We confirmed that the Ct-linkers from three bacterial species behaved as IDPs in vitro by circular dichroism and trypsin proteolysis. We made chimeras, swapping the Escherichia coli linker for Ct-linkers from other bacteria, and even for an unrelated IDP from human α-adducin. Most substitutions allowed for normal cell division, suggesting that sequence of the IDP did not matter. With few exceptions, almost any sequence appears to work. Length, however, was important: IDPs shorter than 43 or longer than 95 aa had compromised or no function. We conclude that the Ct-linker functions as a flexible tether between the globular domain of FtsZ in the protofilament, and its attachment to FtsA/ZipA at the membrane. Modelling the Ct-linker as a worm-like chain, we predict that it functions as a stiff entropic spring linking the bending protofilaments to the membrane.

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