Polydoxy contributes to a much needed reform of theology by exposing the “logic of the One” as a corruption of Christian thought, by its recovery of the importance of apophatic theology, and by its deployment of multiplicity both to celebrate human diversity and as a “name” of divinity. This article extends these themes by considering them as spiritual and not only intellectual practices that can assist us in our responses to the contemporary situation. The article is framed by attention to the environmental crisis that requires and relativizes theological resources as we find ways to act in the world.