Rhodotorula minuta as onychomycosis agent in a Chinese patient: first report and literature review

Authors

  • Jie Zhou,

    1. Shanghai Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Mycology & PLA Key Laboratory of Fungal Disease, ChangZheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China
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  • Min Chen,

    1. Shanghai Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Mycology & PLA Key Laboratory of Fungal Disease, ChangZheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China
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  • Hongduo Chen,

    1. Department of Dermatology, No.1 Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, China
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  • Weihua Pan,

    1. Shanghai Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Mycology & PLA Key Laboratory of Fungal Disease, ChangZheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China
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  • Wanqing Liao

    Corresponding author
    1. Shanghai Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Mycology & PLA Key Laboratory of Fungal Disease, ChangZheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China
    • Correspondence: W. Liao, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Medical Mycology& PLA Key Laboratory of Fungal Disease, ChangZheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, PO Box: 200003, No.415 FengYang Road, Shanghai, China.

      Tel.:+86-21-81885493. Fax: 86-21-63520020.

      E-mail: liaowanqing@sohu.com

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Summary

Onychomycosis is a common superficial fungal infection, which usually caused by dermatophytes, yeast and non-dermatophytic moulds. Recently, we isolated a Rhodotorula minuta isolate from a 15-year-old immunocompetent girl student in Hangzhou (China) that was identified using microscopy, culture morphology, histological diagnosis, API 20C AUX Yeast Identification Kit and sequencing of the Internal Transcribed Spacer region. In vitro, antifungal susceptibility tests showed that this yeast isolate was susceptible to low concentrations of amphotericin B, itraconazole, voriconazole and 5-flvoriconaz but that it appeared to be dose-dependent susceptible to fluconazole(MIC = 16 μg/ml). Furthermore, the effective result of therapy with itraconazole against R. minuta was consistent with that of susceptibility tests.

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