Nephrology

Cover image for Vol. 15 Issue 3

April 2010

Volume 15, Issue 3

Pages 269–379

  1. CLINICAL RESEARCH FOR NEPHROLOGISTS

    1. Top of page
    2. CLINICAL RESEARCH FOR NEPHROLOGISTS
    3. CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    6. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. INSTRUCTIVE CASES/IMAGES
    1. You have free access to this content
      How to get the most from the medical literature: Keeping up to date in nephrology (pages 269–276)

      JEREMY CULLIS and ANGELA C WEBSTER

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01282.x

      Suggestions and ideas for busy clinicians on understanding and using technology to save time and energy, while making information management more efficient. This paper discusses Web 2.0, the use of RSS and eTOC, and portals for accessing journals, guidelines and health news.

    2. How to apply results from randomized trials and systematic reviews to individual patient care (pages 277–280)

      ELISABETH M HODSON and JONATHAN C CRAIG

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01281.x

      Using results from randomized controlled trials and population-based cohort studies, a clinician may apply the results to the management of an individual patient by answering five questions to determine whether the patient will achieve more benefit than harm from the intervention.

  2. CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION

    1. Top of page
    2. CLINICAL RESEARCH FOR NEPHROLOGISTS
    3. CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    6. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. INSTRUCTIVE CASES/IMAGES
    1. Slope-only glomerular filtration rate and single-sample glomerular filtration rate as measurements of the ratio of glomerular filtration rate to extracellular fluid volume (pages 281–287)

      A MICHAEL PETERS, DAPHNE M GLASS and NICHOLAS J BIRD

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2009.01252.x

      This paper shows that the single-sample method of Jacobsson for measuring glomerular filtration rate and the rate constant of the terminal exponential in multi-sample GFR both give GFR per unit extracellular fluid volume (that is mL/min/L). A modified Jacobsson equation is presented that is theoretically more transparent than the original equation. Both equations, however, give almost identical values of GFR.

  3. DIALYSIS

    1. Top of page
    2. CLINICAL RESEARCH FOR NEPHROLOGISTS
    3. CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    6. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. INSTRUCTIVE CASES/IMAGES
    1. Effects of proactive iron and erythropoiesis-stimulating agent protocol implementation on achieving clinical guideline targets for anaemia in a satellite haemodialysis patient cohort (pages 288–293)

      KENNETH YONG and LUKAS KAIRAITIS

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2009.01184.x

      This study demonstrates both the efficacy of a proactive protocol for iron and ESA treatment in haemodialysis patients and a clinical framework which allows for successful implementation of guidelines within a haemodialysis unit.

    2. Ankle brachial index as a predictor for mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease and undergoing haemodialysis (pages 294–299)

      SZU-CHIA CHEN, JER-MING CHANG, SHANG-JYH HWANG, JER-CHIA TSAI, WAN-CHUN LIU, CHUAN-SHENG WANG, TSUNG-HSIEN LIN, HO-MING SU and HUNG-CHUN CHEN

      Article first published online: 30 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01187.x

      Ankle-brachial index (ABI) was shown to be an important screening method for cardiovascular mortality in patients with advanced renal disease. An ABI in excess of 1.3 implicated higher overall and cardiovascular mortality; where an ABI of less than 0.9 predicted higher cardiovascular mortality in CKD and hemodialysis patients.

    3. Colour duplex ultrasound accurately identifies focal stenoses in dysfunctional autogenous arteriovenous fistulae (pages 300–306)

      ABHILASH P CHANDRA, DELFINO DIMASCIO, SIMON GRUENEWALD, BRIAN NANKIVELL, RICHARD DM ALLEN and JAN SWINNEN

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2009.01250.x

      Colour duplex ultrasonography was shown to provide an accurate diagnostic assessment of a dysfunctional autogenous AVF, becoming an important planning tool for subsequent open or endovascular intervention.

    4. Two daytime icodextrin exchanges decrease brain natriuretic peptide levels and improve cardiac functions in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients (pages 307–312)

      TANSU SAV, MEHMET TUGRUL INANC, ALI DOGAN, OKTAY OYMAK and CENGIZ UTAS

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2009.01186.x

      Twice daily icodextrin treatment was found to be useful in hypervolemic CAPD patients for the improvement of cardiac functions. BNP monitoring may be a useful method to evaluate the functions of the LV in CAPD patients.

    5. High-calcium dialysate: A factor associated with inflammation, malnutrition and mortality in non-diabetic maintenance haemodialysis patients (pages 313–320)

      CHING-WEI HSU, JA-LIANG LIN, DAN-TZU LIN-TAN, TZUNG-HAI YEN, KUAN-HSING CHEN, WEN-HUNG HUANG, TAI-CHIN HO and YEN-LIN HUANG

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2009.01202.x

      High-calcium dialysate was found to be significantly associated with inflammation, malnutrition and 2-year mortality in non- diabetic maintenance hemodialysis patients.

  4. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY

    1. Top of page
    2. CLINICAL RESEARCH FOR NEPHROLOGISTS
    3. CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    6. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. INSTRUCTIVE CASES/IMAGES
    1. Effects of mineralocorticoid and angiotensin II receptor blockers on proteinuria and glomerular podocyte protein expression in a model of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (pages 321–326)

      AKIHIRO FUKUDA, SHOUICHI FUJIMOTO, SHUJI IWATSUBO, HIROSHI KAWACHI and KAZUO KITAMURA

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2009.01256.x

      This is an interesting paper describing the effects of mineralocorticoid and angiotensin II receptor blockers in a model of minimal change disease that shows preservation of podocytes with treatment.

    2. Additive antifibrotic effects of pioglitazone and candesartan on experimental renal fibrosis in mice (pages 327–335)

      KEISHI HIGASHI, TAKASHI ODA, TAKETOSHI KUSHIYAMA, TOSHITAKE HYODO, MUNEHARU YAMADA, SHIGENOBU SUZUKI, YUTAKA SAKURAI, SOICHIRO MIURA and HIROO KUMAGAI

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2009.01253.x

      This paper shows that the combination of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonists and candesartan in a non-diabetic model of experimental renal fibrosis is associated with an additive effect. Although lacking in mechanism, this paper has important implications for the potential use of PPAR-γ agonists as antifibrotic therapies in non-diabetic renal disease.

  5. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION

    1. Top of page
    2. CLINICAL RESEARCH FOR NEPHROLOGISTS
    3. CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    6. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. INSTRUCTIVE CASES/IMAGES
    1. Treatment course of steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome: Emphasized on treatment effect (pages 336–339)

      SHIH-YU CHEN, CHAN-YAO WU, I-JUNG TSAI and YONG-KWEI TSAU

      Article first published online: 13 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2009.01190.x

      Alternative treatments were shown to aid children with steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome reducing the use of steroids without significant side effects.

    2. Comparison of the effects of Puumala and Dobrava viruses on early and long-term renal outcomes in patients with haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (pages 340–343)

      DENIJAL TULUMOVIC, GORAN IMAMOVIC, ENISA MESIC, MIRSADA HUKIC, AJSA TULUMOVIC, ALMA IMAMOVIC and ENVER ZEREM

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2009.01195.x

      The Dobrava virus was found to cause a more severe renal impairment than the Puumala virus in the acute phase. Renal function was within normal limits after a 10 year follow up with GFR significantly lower after a Dobrava virus than after Puumala infection.

  6. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE

    1. Top of page
    2. CLINICAL RESEARCH FOR NEPHROLOGISTS
    3. CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    6. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. INSTRUCTIVE CASES/IMAGES
    1. Pentoxifylline improves haemoglobin and interleukin-6 levels in chronic kidney disease (pages 344–349)

      PAOLO FERRARI, DOMINIC MALLON, DEBORAH TRINDER and JOHN K OLYNYK

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2009.01203.x

      Pentoxifylline reduces circulating IL6 and improves haemoglobin levels in non-inflammatory moderate to severe CKD suggesting that pentoxifylline improves iron disposition possibly through modulation of hepcidin.

    2. Functional renal reserve capacity in different stages of chronic kidney disease (pages 350–353)

      SUKANTA BARAI, SANJAY GAMBHIR, NARAYAN PRASAD, RAJ KUMAR SHARMA and MANISH ORA

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01291.x

      Renal reserves were found to decline with the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) from 23.4% in normal to 6.7% in stage 4 CKD.

  7. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS

    1. Top of page
    2. CLINICAL RESEARCH FOR NEPHROLOGISTS
    3. CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    6. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. INSTRUCTIVE CASES/IMAGES
    1. Prevalence and risk factors associated with chronic kidney disease in adults over 40 years: A population study from Central China (pages 354–361)

      YAN SHAN, QIAN ZHANG, ZHANGSUO LIU, XIAOZHOU HU and DONGWEI LIU

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2009.01249.x

      The high prevalence but low awareness of CKD in this study group requires effective preventive and therapeutic interventions. Similar findings may follow among other Asian nations.

    2. Ultrasound of urinary system and urinary screening in 14 256 asymptomatic children in China (pages 362–367)

      HAIPING YANG, QIAO WANG, JUAN LUO, QIU LI, LI WANG, CUI-CUI LI, GAOFU ZHANG, ZHENE XU, HONG TAO and ZHONGXIANG FAN

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2009.01262.x

      Data from this large chronic kidney disease screening cohort in Chinese children suggests the importance of a dipstick urine test and also showed the high incidence of urinary stone among those exposed to melamine-contaminated formula.

  8. TRANSPLANTATION

    1. Top of page
    2. CLINICAL RESEARCH FOR NEPHROLOGISTS
    3. CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    6. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. INSTRUCTIVE CASES/IMAGES
    1. You have free access to this content
      Interleukin-2 receptor antibody does not reduce rejection risk in low immunological risk or tacrolimus-treated intermediate immunological risk renal transplant recipients (pages 368–376)

      WAI H LIM, STEVE J CHADBAN, SCOTT CAMPBELL, HANNAH DENT, GRAEME R RUSS and STEPHEN P MCDONALD

      Article first published online: 2 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2009.01259.x

      In this Australian and New Zealand registry-based analysis IL-2Ra induction therapy was associated with reduced rejection risk in intermediate-risk recipients but this was only apparent in recipients receiving cyclosporine as initial immunosuppression. There was no benefit with regard to patient or graft survival. The use of IL-2Ra was not associated with improved rejection rates in low-risk recipients.

  9. INSTRUCTIVE CASES/IMAGES

    1. Top of page
    2. CLINICAL RESEARCH FOR NEPHROLOGISTS
    3. CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    6. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. INSTRUCTIVE CASES/IMAGES
    1. ACUTE INTERSTITIAL NEPHRITIS SECONDARY TO DEFERASIROX CAUSING ACUTE RENAL INJURY NEEDING SHORT-TERM DIALYSIS (page 377)

      CHEONG T YEW, GIRISH S TALAULIKAR, MICHAEL C FALK, PHILLIP CLAYTON, JAMES D'ROZARIO and MICHAEL BROWN

      Article first published online: 30 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2009.01183.x

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION