Nephrology

Cover image for Vol. 16 Issue 2

February 2011

Volume 16, Issue 2

Pages 121–250

  1. EDITORIAL

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    10. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    11. TRANSPLANTATION
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. World Kidney Day 2011: Protect your kidneys, save your heart (pages 121–124)

      WILLIAM G COUSER and MIGUEL C RIELLA

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01441.x

  2. REVIEW ARTICLES

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    10. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    11. TRANSPLANTATION
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. You have free access to this content
      Understanding crossmatch testing in organ transplantation: A case-based guide for the general nephrologist (pages 125–133)

      WILLIAM R MULLEY and JOHN KANELLIS

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01414.x

      Crossmatching and tissue typing are crucial components of renal transplantation. There have however been a number of new developments in the last decade. This paper discusses current crossmatching techniques and is a very useful aid for nephrologists to interpret the crossmatch results of their patients.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Preeclamptic nephropathy (pages 134–143)

      ANNEMARIE HENNESSY and ANGELA MAKRIS

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01411.x

      This paper by Hennessy and Makris describes the renal changes in pregnancy and preeclampsia, from the clinical presentation in relation to underlying pathophysiology. The paper describes the classic renal syndromes, changes in GFR and proteinuria, RAAS, new molecular mechanisms (including anti-angiogenic proteins), AT1 autoAb and histopathological findings. The authors then discuss the importance of the future impact of preeclampsia on long-term health, and strategies for management.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Is the problem with the vehicle or the destination? Does high-dose ESA or high haemoglobin contribute to poor outcomes in CKD? (pages 144–153)

      SUNIL V BADVE, CARMEL M HAWLEY and DAVID W JOHNSON

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01407.x

      This review provides a comprehensive analysis of the evidence pertaining to the contentious area of whether high haemoglobin or high ESA dose contributes to poor outcomes in ESA-treated CKD patients, providing recommendations where possible and suggesting directions for future research efforts.

  3. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    10. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    11. TRANSPLANTATION
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Interactions of urate transporter URAT1 in human kidney with uricosuric drugs (pages 156–162)

      HO JUNG SHIN, MICHIO TAKEDA, ATSUSHI ENOMOTO, MASAAKI FUJIMURA, HIROKI MIYAZAKI, NAOHIKO ANZAI and HITOSHI ENDOU

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01368.x

      The human urate transporter URAT1 mediates reabsorption of urate on the apical membrane of the proximal tubule. Using a cell culture model (Madin–Darby canine kidney, MDCK), the authors have demonstrated the interactions of URAT1 with uricosuric drugs including 6-hydroxybenzbromarone, probenicid, indomethacin and salicylate, at concentrations similar to intratubular concentrations achieved in humans.

    2. Sphingosine-1-phosphate reduces hepatic ischaemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury through attenuation of endothelial injury in mice (pages 163–173)

      SO-YOUNG LEE, DONG-HEE KIM, SU-AH SUNG, MYUNG-GYU KIM, WON-YONG CHO, HYOUNG-KYU KIM and SANG-KYUNG JO

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01386.x

      Ischaemia/reperfusion-induced liver damage can result in injury to remote organs such as the heart, lungs and kidney. In this paper, a mouse model of partial hepatic ischaemia followed by reperfusion was used to demonstrate the contribution of systemic inflammation and endothelial injury to the development of the associated acute kidney injury. Modulation of the S1P/S1P1 receptor pathway ameliorated acute kidney injury, indicating this pathway may have therapeutic potential.

  4. DIALYSIS

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    10. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    11. TRANSPLANTATION
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. The clinical course of rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterial peritoneal dialysis infections in Asians: A case series and literature review (pages 174–179)

      CLAUDE J RENAUD, SRINIVASAN SUBRAMANIAN, PAUL A TAMBYAH and EVAN JC LEE

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01370.x

      This paper retrospectively reviewed 10 cases of nontuberculous peritonitis and showed how the diagnosis of RGNTM PD infections requires a high index of suspicion and early and appropriate treatment. Also, some associated factors are identified and highlighted is the significant mortality and morbidity associated with this complication.

    2. Relationship between the course of depression symptoms and the left ventricular mass index and left ventricular filling pressure in chronic haemodialysis patients (pages 180–186)

      YONG KYUN KIM, CHAN S PARK, SANG-HYUN IHM, HEE-YEOL KIM, TAI Y HONG, DAI J KIM, CHI-UN PAE, HO C SONG, YONG-SOO KIM and EUY J CHOI

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01372.x

      Depression has previously been linked to left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in dialysis patients. This study demonstrates that only persistent depression correlates with LVH and diastolic dysfunction.

    3. Relation of ankle-brachial index to the rate of decline of residual renal function in peritoneal dialysis patients (pages 187–193)

      JIUNG-HSIUN LIU, SHU-MING WANG, CHING-CHU CHEN, CHUNG-LIN HSIEH, SHIH-YI LIN, CHE-YI CHOU, YAO-LUNG LIU, HSIN-HUNG LIN and CHIU-CHING HUANG

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01378.x

      Peripheral arterial disease is shown to impact on the decline in residual renal function in peritoneal dialysis patients in this paper. The authors used the ankle-brachial index to determine the presence of peripheral vascular disease and have assumed this reflects generalized vascular disease.

  5. HYPERTENSION

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    10. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    11. TRANSPLANTATION
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Changes in renal markers and acute kidney injury after marathon running (pages 194–199)

      PETER A MCCULLOUGH, KAVITHA M CHINNAIYAN, MICHAEL J GALLAGHER, JAMES M COLAR, TIMOTHY GEDDES, JEFFREY M GOLD and JUSTIN E TRIVAX

      Version of Record online: 18 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01354.x

      This paper describes that some marathon runners experience a transient rise in serum creatinine that meets criteria of AKI with a parallel elevation of blood biomarkers (NGAL and KIM-1) that resolve within 24 h. These data suggest AKI with a transient and minor change in renal filtration function occurs with the stress of marathon running.

  6. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    10. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    11. TRANSPLANTATION
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Triptolide attenuates renal interstitial fibrosis in rats with unilateral ureteral obstruction (pages 200–210)

      XIAO-PENG YUAN, XIAO-SHUN HE, CHANG-XI WANG, LONG-SHAN LIU and QIAN FU

      Version of Record online: 7 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01359.x

      In this study, triptolide was reported to reduce inflammation and fibrosis in an experimental model of unilateral ureteral obstruction. Although the precise mode of action is not clear in the study, the data is interesting because triptolide has been used in China for the treatment of glomerulonephritis.

    2. Injured kidney cells express SM22α (transgelin): Unique features distinct from α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) (pages 211–218)

      YUICHI SAKAMAKI, MINORU SAKATSUME, XINGZHI WANG, SHIGERU INOMATA, TADASHI YAMAMOTO, FUMITAKE GEJYO and ICHIEI NARITA

      Version of Record online: 19 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01322.x

      This manuscript describes de novo expression of the actin-associated protein SM22α (also known as transgelin) by injured podocytes in a rat model of crescentic glomerulonephritis. Immuno-EM localized SM22α to effaced, but not intact, foot processes in podocytes suggest a role for this molecule in reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton following podocyte injury.

  7. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    10. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    11. TRANSPLANTATION
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. The epidemiological association of altitude with chronic kidney disease: Evidence of protective effect (pages 219–224)

      NASROLLAH GHAHRAMANI, FARIS AHMED, AMMAR AL-LAHAM and EUGENE J. LENGERICH

      Version of Record online: 30 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01332.x

      This is an interesting paper suggesting the negative association between the prevalence of end-stage renal disease and altitude of residence. Pathophysiological basis of this observation needs to be proved by future research. Significance of hypoxic stimulus and the protective effects of erythropoietin are interesting hypotheses.

  8. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    10. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    11. TRANSPLANTATION
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. High incidence and recurrence of transitional cell carcinoma in Taiwanese patients with end-stage renal disease (pages 225–231)

      TSUNG-YANG WANG, CHIA-JUNG HU, CHIN-WEI KUO, YU CHEN, JA-LIANG LIN, CHIH-WEI YANG and TZUNG-HAI YEN

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01366.x

      Taiwanese patients with ESRD had high incidence (0.9%) and recurrence (35.7%) of transitional cell carcinoma. Interestingly, nearly one-third of the patients with unknown aetiology of ESRD, but chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis following long-term consumption of Chinese herbs or analgesic compounds was considered in parts of the patients.

  9. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    10. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    11. TRANSPLANTATION
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. What do renal health-care professionals in Singapore think of advance care planning for patients with end-stage renal disease? (pages 232–238)

      ALETHEA YEE, YING YING SEOW, SZE HUEY TAN, CYNTHIA GOH, LIMIN QU and GRACE LEE

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01401.x

      The paper summarizes the results from a questionnaire about attitudes to advance care planning sent to health professionals in Singapore. It is remarkable for its high participation rate. It sheds considerable light on the issues which need to be addressed in order to increase the utilization of advance care planning.

  10. TRANSPLANTATION

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    10. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    11. TRANSPLANTATION
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Slow and steady. Reducing thrombotic events in renal transplant recipients treated with IVIg for antibody-mediated rejection (pages 239–242)

      LOUIS HUANG, JOHN KANELLIS and WILLIAM MULLEY

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01399.x

      This is an important local manuscript that addresses a thankfully rare complication of IVIg, namely thrombosis in desensitization protocols. As these transplants are being increasingly performed this complication should be highlighted.

    2. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, in patients with end-stage kidney disease on dialysis, in the greater Auckland region, from 2000–2006 (pages 243–248)

      JAMIE C KENDRICK-JONES, DAVID M VOSS and JANAK R DE ZOYSA

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01397.x

      This manuscript details regional incidence rates for nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in a dialysis population in New Zealand. It is interesting and topical in light of the rate of reporting of cases of NSF has declined, presumably because of decreased use of gadodiamide and caution in cases with GFR < 15.

  11. CORRESPONDENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    8. NEPHROLOGY IN HIGH RISK POPULATIONS
    9. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    10. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    11. TRANSPLANTATION
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. CYCLOSPORINE AND LACTATION (page 249)

      Adam Morton

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01395.x

    2. PYREXIA OF UNKNOWN ORIGIN AND PROTEINURIA: AN ENIGMA SOLVED BY RENAL BIOPSY (pages 249–250)

      Desmond YH Yap, Czarina CH Leung, Gloria YY Hwang, Anskar YH Leung, Gavin SW Chan, Kwok W Chan and Sydney CW Tang

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01388.x

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