Nephrology

Cover image for Vol. 17 Issue 1

January 2012

Volume 17, Issue 1

Pages 1–98

  1. REVIEW ARTICLES

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLES
    3. KHA - CARI GUIDELINE
    4. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. You have free access to this content
      Mesenchymal stem cells in kidney inflammation and repair (pages 1–10)

      ANDREA F. WISE and SHARON D. RICARDO

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01501.x

      This review discusses the potential therapeutic role of mesenchymal stem cells in kidney disease.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Urinary tubular biomarkers as potential early predictors of renal allograft rejection (pages 11–16)

      YI-TIAN TING, P TOBY COATES, ROBERT J WALKER and ALEXANDER D MCLELLAN

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01536.x

      Ting et al. review the feasibility and current status of non-invasive measurement of urinary tubular biomarkers in renal transplant recipients. These various markers may reveal early graft injury and thus allow timely intervention without the need for biopsy. The manuscript provides much hope for this relatively simple technology and its future use in clinical practice.

  2. KHA - CARI GUIDELINE

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLES
    3. KHA - CARI GUIDELINE
    4. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. KHA-CARI guideline: Biochemical and haematological targets: Haemoglobin concentrations in patients using erythropoietin-stimulating agents (pages 17–19)

      LAWRENCE P MCMAHON and ROBERT MACGINLEY

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01535.x

      This is an update of a previous CARI Guideline on management of anaemia in CKD patients.

  3. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLES
    3. KHA - CARI GUIDELINE
    4. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Identification of two novel mutations in the OCRL1 gene in two Chinese families with Lowe syndrome (pages 20–25)

      YAO-HUA KE, JIN-WEI HE, WEN-ZHEN FU and ZHEN-LIN ZHANG

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01514.x

      Lowe syndrome develops from a rare multisystem, X-linked, gene disorder. The OCRL1 gene is mutated, with development of anomalies in the eyes, nervous system, and the kidneys. The identification of gene mutations in Chinese patients has not been reported previously. Here, two novel mutations in OCLR1 are reported in Chinese families with Lowe syndrome.

    2. Efficacy and safety of cinacalcet for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease before initiation of regular dialysis (pages 26–31)

      JESÚS MONTENEGRO, IÑAKI CORNAGO, ISABEL GALLARDO, PAULA GARCÍA-LEDESMA, AINHOA HERNANDO, ISABEL MARTINEZ, ROSA I MUÑOZ and MARCO A ROMERO

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01530.x

      This study explores the efficacy and safety of cinacalcet primarily used in combination with Vitamin D and/or calcium based phosphate binder in the pre-dialysis cohort. The use of cinacalcet in this population is controversial, as the Phase 2/3 studies although demonstrating efficacy in reducing PTH, had resulted in the undesirable outcomes of hypocalcaemia and elevation of serum phosphate. In this uncontrolled study of 26 patients, more modest changes are seen in serum calcium and phosphate. The authors suggest that combining low dose cinacalcet with vitamin D and calcium binders could be considered in resistant hyperparathyroidism in this population.

    3. How do people with chronic kidney disease value cancer-related quality of life? (pages 32–41)

      GERMAINE WONG, KIRSTEN HOWARD, JEREMY CHAPMAN, CAROL POLLOCK, STEVEN CHADBAN, GLENN SALKELD, ALLISON TONG, NARELLE WILLIAMS, ANGELA WEBSTER and JONATHAN C CRAIG

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01531.x

      This innovative study examines quality of life (QOL) in different stages of CKD including the coexistent hypothetical scenarios of early and advanced stage colorectal cancer. QOL is significantly reduced in CKD and this study shows that coexistent illnesses have the capacity to significantly reduce QOL particularly in late stage disease. The study also demonstrates tools to enable decision cost–utility analyses.

  4. DIALYSIS

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLES
    3. KHA - CARI GUIDELINE
    4. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Changes in serum prolactin, sex hormones and thyroid function with alternate nightly nocturnal home haemodialysis (pages 42–47)

      CAROLYN VAN EPS, CARMEL HAWLEY, JANINE JEFFRIES, DAVID W JOHNSON, SCOTT CAMPBELL, NICOLE ISBEL, DAVID W MUDGE and JOHANNES PRINS

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01520.x

      This study demonstrated that alternate nightly nocturnal haemodialysis significantly improved hyperprolactinaemia and hypotestosteronaemia in men. Menstrual cycling may be re-established in young women.

  5. GLOMERULONEPHRITIS

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLES
    3. KHA - CARI GUIDELINE
    4. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Invasive pneumococcal pneumonia is the major cause of paediatric haemolytic-uraemic syndrome in Taiwan (pages 48–52)

      CHING-SUNG LEE, MEI-JU CHEN, YEE-HSUAN CHIOU, CHING-FEN SHEN, CHAN-YAO WU and YUAN-YOW CHIOU

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01500.x

      The authors describe the haemolytic-uraemic syndrome (HUS) in Taiwan. They report the clinical cause and predictors of outcome of Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated haemolytic-uraemic syndrome (SP-HUS), which is a major causative concern, especially in paediatric acute renal failure.

    2. Urinary angiotensinogen levels in relation to renal involvement of Henoch-Schonlein purpura in children (pages 53–57)

      YAN NA MAO, WEI LIU, YAN GE LI, GUO CUN JIA, ZHANG ZHANG, YU JIE GUAN, XU FENG ZHOU and YU FENG LIU

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01515.x

      The authors have investigated the relationship between urinary angiotensinogen (UAGT) and disease activity in children with Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP). They found a significant correlation between UAGT and severity of disease, and suggested that UAGT could be a useful biomarker for monitoring the progression of HSP with renal involvement.

  6. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLES
    3. KHA - CARI GUIDELINE
    4. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Transient hypoxia-inducible factor activation in rat renal ablation and reduced fibrosis with L-mimosine (pages 58–67)

      XIAOFANG YU, YI FANG, XIAOQIANG DING, HONG LIU, JIAMING ZHU, JIANZHOU ZOU, XUNHUI XU and YIHONG ZHONG

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01498.x

      Yu and colleagues have undertaken a detailed analysis of the time-course of hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) signalling in the rat remnant kidney disease model. Their data showed that HIF upregulation was transient and restricted to the first 4 weeks following nephrectomy (when renal function was stable), and then returned to basal levels. Interestingly, treatment with a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor (L-mimosine) during the later phase of disease (weeks 5 to 12) upregulated HIF, and improved renal function and reduced tubulointerstitial fibrosis.

    2. Histological predictors for renal prognosis in diabetic nephropathy in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients with overt proteinuria (pages 68–75)

      TOMONARI OKADA, TOSHITAKA NAGAO, HIROSHI MATSUMOTO, YUME NAGAOKA, TOSHIKAZU WADA and TOSHIYUKI NAKAO

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01525.x

      The authors report on a series of 69 patients with a diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy after renal biopsy, finding that tubulointerstitial changes are correlated with clinical outcomes. In this study, other concurrent diagnoses were excluded, but presumably the decision to biopsy was made on clinical suspicion of another diagnosis. Glomerular lesions were not predictive, though patients with minor changes were excluded, and there were few patients with more advanced lesions. This significant series helps inform our knowledge of clinic-histological correlations in diabetic nephropathy.

  7. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLES
    3. KHA - CARI GUIDELINE
    4. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. You have free access to this content
      Increases in renal replacement therapy in Australia and New Zealand: Understanding trends in diabetic nephropathy (pages 76–84)

      BLAIR S GRACE, PHILIP CLAYTON and STEPHEN P MCDONALD

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01512.x

      This paper highlights the epidemiology of changes in ESRD incidence among Indigenous people with diabetes in Australia and NZ. It contributes to the international understanding of trends in diabetic ESKD among indigenous peoples.

  8. TRANSPLANTATION

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLES
    3. KHA - CARI GUIDELINE
    4. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Long-term outcomes of living kidney donors: A single centre experience of 29 years (pages 85–88)

      KWOK-HONG CHU, CLARA KA-YAN POON, CHUNG-MAN LAM, AU CHEUK, KA-FAI YIM, WILLIAM LEE, HON-LOK TANG, HILDA WAI-HAN CHAN, KA-SHUN FUNG and KWOK-LUNG TONG

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01524.x

      In this review, the authors describe their single-centre experience with 149 live donors over 29 years. Hypertension developed in 19% of the donors with stage 3 CKD developing in 17.3%. Age was the main predisposing factor for the development of hypertension and CKD.

    2. New onset diabetes after kidney transplantation in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: A retrospective cohort study (pages 89–96)

      IRENE RUDERMAN, ROSEMARY MASTERSON, CHRISTOPHER YATES, ALEXANDRA GORELIK, SHLOMO J COHNEY and ROWAN G WALKER

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01507.x

      New onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) is a common and potentially serious complication of organ transplantation. It has been reported that patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are at increased risk of NODAT compared with other kidney transplant recipients. The authors examined the incidence of NODAT in 502 recipients (ADPKD in 79 patients) of renal transplants between January 2000 and October 2008. Their study clarified a lack of association between ADPKD and post-transplant diabetes.

  9. CORRESPONDENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLES
    3. KHA - CARI GUIDELINE
    4. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    9. TRANSPLANTATION
    10. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. THE EYES HAVE IT (page 97)

      John Paul Killen

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01506.x

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