Nephrology

Cover image for Vol. 17 Issue 8

November 2012

Volume 17, Issue 8

Pages 669–787

  1. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE

    1. Top of page
    2. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    3. CLINICAL GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    6. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    7. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    8. PERITONEAL DIALYSIS
    9. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    10. COCHRANE COMMENTARY
    11. EDITORIAL
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. α-Actinin-4 is involved in the process by which dexamethasone protects actin cytoskeleton stabilization from adriamycin-induced podocyte injury (pages 669–675)

      HAIMEI LIU, XIA GAO, HONG XU, CHUN FENG, XINYU KUANG, ZENGXIA LI and XILIANG ZHA

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01645.x

      The exact mechanism of benefit with steroids in minimal change nephrotic syndrome is not known. The authors show that adriamycin treatment causes rearrangement of actin cytoskeleton of podocytes, which is restored by dexamethasone. This action is mediated via alpha-actinin 4.

  2. CLINICAL GLOMERULONEPHRITIS

    1. Top of page
    2. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    3. CLINICAL GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    6. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    7. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    8. PERITONEAL DIALYSIS
    9. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    10. COCHRANE COMMENTARY
    11. EDITORIAL
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Proliferation signal inhibitors in the treatment of lupus nephritis: Preliminary experience (pages 676–680)

      DESMOND YH YAP, MAGGIE KM MA, COLIN SO TANG and TAK MAO CHAN

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01646.x

      Newer drugs that have been useful in transplantation may find a niche in treating immune renal disease. Yap et al. present their recent experience with sirolimus and everolimus in lupus nephritis.

    2. Occurrence of infection among children with nephrotic syndrome during hospitalizations (pages 681–688)

      CHANG-CHING WEI, I-WEN YU, HSIANG-WEN LIN and ALAN C TSAI

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01650.x

      The authors report the incidence of infection and its associated factor in children with nephrotic syndrome (NS) from the viewpoint of public health in Taiwan, using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database.

  3. DIALYSIS

    1. Top of page
    2. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    3. CLINICAL GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    6. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    7. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    8. PERITONEAL DIALYSIS
    9. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    10. COCHRANE COMMENTARY
    11. EDITORIAL
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Decreased serum carnitine is independently correlated with increased tissue accumulation levels of advanced glycation end products in haemodialysis patients (pages 689–694)

      TAKEKI ADACHI, KEI FUKAMI, SHO-ICHI YAMAGISHI, YUSUKE KAIDA, RYOTARO ANDO, KAZUKO SAKAI, HISASHI ADACHI, AKI OTSUKA, SEIJI UEDA, KENZO SUGI and SEIYA OKUDA

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01642.x

      This study demonstrated decreased serum carnitine levels and elevated skin advanced glycation end products in haemodialysis patients, and provides a possible novel marker of cardiovascular outcomes in this group of patients.

    2. Quantifying acute changes in volume and nutritional status during haemodialysis using bioimpedance analysis (pages 695–702)

      HORNG-RUEY CHUA, LING XIANG, PEK-YEE CHOW, HUI XU, LIANG SHEN, EVAN LEE and BOON-WEE TEO

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01653.x

      The results showed that the multi-frequency bioimpedance analysis (MFBIA)-derived total body water change has the best agreement with acute clinical volume change during haemodialysis compared to extracellular or intracellular volume change alone in end-stage renal disease patients during haemodialysis. MFBIA nutritional measures are confounded by hydration status, except for fat mass.

    3. Australian consumer perspectives on dialysis: First national census (pages 703–709)

      MARIE J LUDLOW, LYDIA A LAUDER, TIMOTHY H MATHEW, CARMEL M HAWLEY and DEBBIE FORTNUM

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01651.x

      The percentage of home dialysis in Australia has steadily decreased over the past 40 years. Consumer factors related to the delivery of pre-dialysis education do not support all options of dialysis for all individuals. State variances indicate that local policy and health professional teams significantly influence the operation of dialysis programs.

    4. Pregabalin versus gabapentin in the treatment of neuropathic pruritus in maintenance haemodialysis patients: A prospective, crossover study (pages 710–717)

      YALCIN SOLAK, ZEYNEP BIYIK, HUSEYIN ATALAY, ABDUZHAPPAR GAIPOV, FIGEN GUNEY, SULEYMAN TURK, ADRIAN COVIC, DAVID GOLDSMITH and MEHMET KANBAY

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01655.x

      This paper examines the complex relationship betwen peripheral neuropathy and itch in patients receiving haemodialysis and considers whether treatment with gabapentin or pregabalin provides effective therapy. Either treatment was useful for modification of both pruritus and neuropathic pain. Further trials are required to explore this in greater detail.

    5. Higher serum levels of soluble intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule predict peripheral artery disease in haemodialysis patients (pages 718–724)

      CHI-HUNG CHENG, YI-SHYAN CHEN, KUO-HSIUNG SHU, HORNG-RONG CHANG and MING-CHIH CHOU

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01654.x

      This study shows that elevated serum levels of soluble VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 are associated with peripheral artery disease in haemodialysis patients, and suggests that these adhesion molecules can be used as a biomarker for cardiovascular disease.

  4. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY

    1. Top of page
    2. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    3. CLINICAL GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    6. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    7. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    8. PERITONEAL DIALYSIS
    9. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    10. COCHRANE COMMENTARY
    11. EDITORIAL
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Age dependent impact of estimated glomerular filtration rate on long-term survival after ischaemic stroke (pages 725–732)

      HELBERT N. LIMA, NORBERTO L. CABRAL, JARROD FRANKLIN, CARLA HELOISA C. MORO, ROBERTO PECOITS-FILHO and ANDERSON R. GONÇALVES

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01643.x

      This article demonstrates that low estimated glomerular filtration rate measured at the first day of admission of ischemic stroke is a good predictor of death.

  5. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY

    1. Top of page
    2. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    3. CLINICAL GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    6. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    7. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    8. PERITONEAL DIALYSIS
    9. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    10. COCHRANE COMMENTARY
    11. EDITORIAL
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Gut bacterial translocation is associated with microinflammation in end-stage renal disease patients (pages 733–738)

      FEIQIAN WANG, HONGLI JIANG, KEHUI SHI, YI REN, PAN ZHANG and SHAOLI CHENG

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01647.x

      Wang et al. evaluated the bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract in non-dialysed ESRD patients and its contribution to micoinflammation in the patient population.

    2. Rapamycin-mediated suppression of renal cyst expansion in del34 Pkd1−/− mutant mouse embryos: An investigation of the feasibility of renal cyst prevention in the foetus (pages 739–747)

      CHERIE STAYNER, JUSTIN SHIELDS, LYNN SLOBBE, JONATHAN M SHILLINGFORD, THOMAS WEIMBS and MICHAEL R ECCLES

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01639.x

      Stayner et al. investigated the effect of rapamycin on polycystic kidney disease in utero. Their data showed the potential beneficial effects of rapamycin administered during pregnancy in a rodent model of polycystic kidney disease, while cyst number remains unchanged; the size of the cysts is reduced by rapamycin treatment. Furthermore, they also showed that the inhibition of the mTOR pathway by rapamycin most likely is not mediated via Pax2 in their experimental animal model. The result provides evidence that mTOR inhibition may be therapeutically useful for slowing the progression of polycystic kidney disease with a prenatal onset.

  6. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION

    1. Top of page
    2. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    3. CLINICAL GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    6. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    7. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    8. PERITONEAL DIALYSIS
    9. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    10. COCHRANE COMMENTARY
    11. EDITORIAL
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, treatment with steroid and impact on renal outcomes (pages 748–753)

      MUHAMMAD N RAZA, MUHAMMAD HADID, CHARLES E KEEN, CORALIE BINGHAM and ANDREW HJ SALMON

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01648.x

      Effects of steroids in acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (ATIN) are still controversial. This study shows a greater degree of improvement in renal function in steroid-treated patients with ATIN. Yet, no correlation was shown between the degree of renal recovery and delay in starting steroids.

  7. PERITONEAL DIALYSIS

    1. Top of page
    2. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    3. CLINICAL GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    6. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    7. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    8. PERITONEAL DIALYSIS
    9. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    10. COCHRANE COMMENTARY
    11. EDITORIAL
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Catheter revision for the treatment of intractable exit site infection/tunnel infection in peritoneal dialysis patients: A single centre experience (pages 760–766)

      KYU-HYANG CHO, JUN-YOUNG DO, JONG-WON PARK and KYUNG-WOO YOON

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01644.x

      This paper details how PD catheter revision may be an alternative option to catheter removal for refractory exit site infections and tunnel infections. This involves the removal of the external cuff and infected tissue above the internal cuff and creation of a new subcutaneous tunnel and exit-site under local anaesthetic. There were 36 catheter revisions performed and the outcomes are presented in addition to details of this group's PD exit site infection rate, organisms involved and outcomes over 32 581 PD patient months.

  8. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE

    1. Top of page
    2. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    3. CLINICAL GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    6. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    7. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    8. PERITONEAL DIALYSIS
    9. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    10. COCHRANE COMMENTARY
    11. EDITORIAL
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Early molecular responses of bone to obstructive nephropathy induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice (pages 767–773)

      SA-SA GU, YAN ZHANG, SHU-YAN WU, TENG-YUE DIAO, YOSEPH ASMELASH GEBRU and HONG-WEN DENG

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01656.x

      In this study, mice developed hypocalcaemia and hyperparathyroidism following ureteric obstruction. The authors describe subsequent changes in the mRNA expression of target genes and microarchitectrural changes in the proximal tibia, likely to be precursors of renal osteodystrophy. They suggest that in addition to established genetic pathways, the renin-angiotensin system may also be involved.

  9. COCHRANE COMMENTARY

    1. Top of page
    2. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    3. CLINICAL GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    6. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    7. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    8. PERITONEAL DIALYSIS
    9. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    10. COCHRANE COMMENTARY
    11. EDITORIAL
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
  10. EDITORIAL

    1. Top of page
    2. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    3. CLINICAL GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    6. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    7. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    8. PERITONEAL DIALYSIS
    9. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    10. COCHRANE COMMENTARY
    11. EDITORIAL
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Trade-off between the benefits of lithium treatment and the risk of chronic kidney disease (pages 776–779)

      WILLIAM R ADAM, ISAAC SSHWEITZER and ROWAN G WALKER

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01641.x

  11. CORRESPONDENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    3. CLINICAL GLOMERULONEPHRITIS
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    6. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    7. PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY & INFLAMMATION
    8. PERITONEAL DIALYSIS
    9. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    10. COCHRANE COMMENTARY
    11. EDITORIAL
    12. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. FABRY DISEASE AND IMMUNOGLOBULIN A NEPHROPATHY (pages 782–783)

      Chia-Ter Chao, Wei-Chou Lin and Tze-Wah Kao

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01594.x

    2. RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME REPORTED BY INCIDENT HAEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS: IS TREATMENT TIME OF DAY RELEVANT? (pages 783–784)

      Nancy G Kutner, Rebecca Zhang, Lynda A Szczech and Donald L Bliwise

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01629.x

    3. Referees (pages 785–787)

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01666.x

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