Nephrology

Cover image for Vol. 18 Issue 12

December 2013

Volume 18, Issue 12

Pages 747–844

  1. KHA-CARI GUIDELINE

    1. Top of page
    2. KHA-CARI GUIDELINE
    3. DIABETES
    4. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. TRANSPLANTATION
    8. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    9. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. KHA-CARI Guideline: Use of iron in chronic kidney disease patients (pages 747–749)

      Rob MacGinley, Rowan Walker and Michelle Irving

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12139

  2. DIABETES

    1. Top of page
    2. KHA-CARI GUIDELINE
    3. DIABETES
    4. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. TRANSPLANTATION
    8. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    9. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography is a valid technique for the assessment of renal microvascular perfusion dysfunction in diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats (pages 750–760)

      Fang Ma, Ganga Prasad Yadav, Yan-qin Cang, Yuan-yuan Dang, Chao-qing Wang, Bo Liu, Le-hang Guo, Xin-hua Li and Ai Peng

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12159

      Summary at a Glance

      Novel use of real-time contrast enhanced ultrasonography to detect changes in renal microvascular perfusion in a type 2 diabetic rat model. Progressive changes in microvascular perfusion were detected over time. A potentially useful tool for real-time assessment of changes in renal cortical microvascular perfusion.

  3. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE

    1. Top of page
    2. KHA-CARI GUIDELINE
    3. DIABETES
    4. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. TRANSPLANTATION
    8. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    9. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Protective effects of angiotensin-(1–7) administrated with an angiotensin-receptor blocker in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (pages 761–769)

      Chengyan Xu, Wei Ding, Minmin Zhang and Yong Gu

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12146

      Summary at a Glance

      The authors examined the effects of angiotensin-(1–7) (Ang-(1–7)) alone or in combination with angiotensin-receptor blockers using subtotal nephrectomized rats. The results showed that Ang-(1–7) ameliorated the renal injury. The combination of Ang-(1–7) and losartan exerted a superior effect to that of Ang-(1–7) alone on regression of renal injury.

  4. DIALYSIS

    1. Top of page
    2. KHA-CARI GUIDELINE
    3. DIABETES
    4. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. TRANSPLANTATION
    8. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    9. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Increased rate of force development and neuromuscular activity after high-load resistance training in patients undergoing dialysis (pages 770–776)

      Stig Molsted, Jesper L Andersen, Inge Eidemak and Adrian P Harrison

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12145

      Summary at a Glance

      Resistance training in dialysis patients leads to improved neuromuscular function as well as muscle strength. Resistance training may improve the physical functioning of dialysis patients.

    2. Circulating levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end product are inversely associated with vascular calcification in patients on haemodialysis independent of S100A12 (EN-RAGE) levels (pages 777–782)

      Hyung Soo Kim, Wookyung Chung, Ae Jin Kim, Han Ro, Jae Hyun Chang, Hyun Hee Lee and Ji Yong Jung

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12166

      Summary at a Glance

      Soluble RAGE (sRAGE) has anti-inflammatory effects by counteracting the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a central regulator of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. This study reports an inverse association between sRAGE and vascular calcification in haemodialysis patients, independent of the extracellular RAGE-binding protein S100A12 (EN-RAGE) which is pro-inflammatory and may have a pleiotropic role in inflammatory processes.

    3. Anti-coagulation, anti-platelets or no therapy in haemodialysis patients with atrial fibrillation: A decision analysis (pages 783–789)

      Melanie LR Wyld, Philip A Clayton, Rachael L Morton and Steven J Chadban

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12170

      Summary at a Glance

      This paper provides a timely analysis of the use of warfarin for AF in dialysis patients, based on a decision analysis approach. For older patients, it suggests that warfarin may not always be the most appropriate therapy.

    4. Nutritional status of haemodialysis patients: Comparison of Australian cohorts of Aboriginal and European descent (pages 790–797)

      Alwyn Todd, Robert Carroll, Meghan Gallagher and Anthony Meade

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12165

      Summary at a Glance

      In this first study of dietetic assessment of Australian Aboriginal maintenance haemodialysis subjects, 35% showed evidence of malnutrition despite adequate dialysis. This paper illustrates the need for more research in an over-represented haemodialysis patient population.

  5. HYPERTENSION

    1. Top of page
    2. KHA-CARI GUIDELINE
    3. DIABETES
    4. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. TRANSPLANTATION
    8. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    9. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Hypertension and kidney function in an adult population of West Bengal, India: Role of body weight, waist circumference, proteinuria and rural area living (pages 798–807)

      Maurizio Gallieni, Bogdan Ene-Iordache, Angela Aiello, Benedetta Tucci, Valeria Sala, Sujit K Brahmochary Mandal, Anna Doneda, Andrea Stella, Sergio Carminati, Norberto Perico and Simonetta Genovesi

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12142

      Summary at a Glance

      This survey of blood pressure and renal function in West Bengal reveals high rates of hypertension associated with high body mass index, urban living, proteinuria and reduced glomerular filtration rate. Given the limited access to health care, preventive strategies assume high priority.

  6. TRANSPLANTATION

    1. Top of page
    2. KHA-CARI GUIDELINE
    3. DIABETES
    4. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. TRANSPLANTATION
    8. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    9. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Tonsillectomy ameliorates histological damage of recurrent immunoglobulin A nephropathy after kidney transplantation (pages 808–812)

      Kiyohiko Hotta, Yuichiro Fukasawa, Mayuko Akimoto, Tatsu Tanabe, Hajime Sasaki, Nobuyuki Fukuzawa, Toshimori Seki, Masaki Togashi and Hiroshi Harada

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12151

      Summary at a Glance

      Tonsillectomy improves clinical and histologic parameters in 15 Japanese patients with recurrent IgA nephropathy after kidney transplant. The availability of repeat biopsy in all patients is a strength of this study, while the lack of a control group is a drawback.

    2. Cytomegalovirus & Epstein Barr Virus serostatus as a predictor of the long-term outcome of kidney transplantation (pages 813–819)

      Amelia K Le Page, Fiona E Mackie, Steven J McTaggart and Sean E Kennedy

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12149

      Summary at a Glance

      This study addresses the implication of donor/recipient CMV and EBV status on renal transplant outcomes, as captured by the large ANZDATA and ANZOD registry database.

    3. Outcomes of combination therapy for chronic antibody-mediated rejection in renal transplantation (pages 820–826)

      Myung-Gyu Kim, Yoon Jung Kim, Hyuk Yong Kwon, Hayne Cho Park, Tai Yeon Koo, Jong Cheol Jeong, Hee Jung Jeon, Miyeun Han, Curie Ahn and Jaeseok Yang

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12157

      Summary at a Glance

      The short term outcomes of three approaches for chronic antibody mediated rejection, including bortezomib, IVIG and rituximab are presented in this clinical experience.

    4. Health-related quality of life of patients awaiting kidney and simultaneous pancreas–kidney transplants (pages 827–832)

      Thida M Myint, Denise V O'Shaughnessy, Samual Marshall, Mirna Vucak-Dzumhur and Grahame J Elder

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12160

      Summary at a Glance

      Two major messages are carried by this manuscript. First, young patients on waiting list for renal or kidney–pancreas transplant can live with significantly worse quality of life than the general dialysis population. Second, the effect of psychosocial intervention (besides putting a patient on waiting list) should be explored.

  7. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY

    1. Top of page
    2. KHA-CARI GUIDELINE
    3. DIABETES
    4. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. TRANSPLANTATION
    8. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    9. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Glomerular expression of myxovirus resistance protein 1 in human mesangial cells: Possible activation of innate immunity in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (pages 833–837)

      Shojiro Watanabe, Tadaatsu Imaizumi, Kazushi Tsuruga, Tomomi Aizawa, Tatsuya Ito, Tomoh Matsumiya, Hidemi Yoshida, Kensuke Joh, Etsuro Ito and Hiroshi Tanaka

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12155

    2. Clinical features and mutation of NPHP5 in two Chinese siblings with Senior-Løken syndrome (pages 838–842)

      Huajuan Tong, Zhihui Yue, Liangzhong Sun, Huiqin Chen, Weiguang Wang and Haiyan Wang

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12156

  8. CORRESPONDENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. KHA-CARI GUIDELINE
    3. DIABETES
    4. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. HYPERTENSION
    7. TRANSPLANTATION
    8. INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY
    9. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Extreme metabolic alkalosis: Excessive alkali intake due to ulcerative disease (page 844)

      Jean-François Llitjos, Nicolas Mongardon, Yoann Crabol, Khalil El Karoui, Philippe Blanche, Laurence Moachon, Frédéric Pène and Jean-Paul Mira

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12141

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