Nephrology

Cover image for Vol. 18 Issue 7

July 2013

Volume 18, Issue 7

Pages 483–532

  1. KHA CARI GUIDELINES

    1. Top of page
    2. KHA CARI GUIDELINES
    3. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    6. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE
    7. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. KHA-CARI guideline: Dialysis adequacy (haemodialysis): Dialysis membranes (pages 485–488)

      Peter G Kerr and Nigel D Toussaint

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12096

      Summary at a glance

      This is a concise and objective assessment of the potential benefits of different types of membranes: notably synthetic high flux membranes. This review represents CARI's guidelines and should be beneficial to the nephrologists.

  2. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE

    1. Top of page
    2. KHA CARI GUIDELINES
    3. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    6. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE
    7. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Derivation and validation of a prediction score for acute kidney injury in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure in a Chinese cohort (pages 489–496)

      Yin-na Wang, Hong Cheng, Tong Yue and Yi-pu Chen

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12092

      Summary at a Glance

      Development and validation of a risk prediction score for patients with acute heart failure (AHF) in a Chinese cohort identified that age, previous hospital admissions for AHF, heart function class, systolic hypotension, hyponatraemia, proteinuria, elevated serum creatinine and Frusemide dose effectively predict AKI in the patients hospitalized with AHF.

  3. DIALYSIS

    1. Top of page
    2. KHA CARI GUIDELINES
    3. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    6. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE
    7. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Efficacy of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide digit number for screening of cardiac disease in new haemodialysis patients (pages 497–504)

      Masaki Iwasaki, Nobuhiko Joki, Yuri Tanaka, Nobutaka Ikeda, Toshihide Hayashi, Shun Kubo, Takasuke Asakawa, Yasunori Takahashi, Koichi Hirahata, Yoshihiko Imamura and Hiroki Hase

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12063

      Summary at a Glance

      This study examined a cohort of new dialysis patients and investigated whether the digit number of NT-pro-BNP may be useful in initial cardiac risk stratification in these patients. They showed that the digit number of NT-proBNP concentration just before the first dialysis session is a useful tool for screening for cardiac abnormalities. 4.5 was the digit number that best predicted all cardiac abnormalities.

    2. Psychological factors associated with successful outcomes in home haemodialysis (pages 505–509)

      Jane Nearhos, Carolyn Van Eps and Jason Connor

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12089

      Summary at a Glance

      This study identifies that adaptive coping strategies can improve the success of maintaining home haemodialysis. Psychological interventions to help sustain successful home haemodialysis need further study.

    3. Performance of the Framingham Risk Score in patients receiving hemodialysis (pages 510–515)

      Jiun-Chi Huang, Szu-Chia Chen, Ho-Ming Su, Jer-Ming Chang, Shang-Jyh Hwang and Hung-Chun Chen

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12094

      Summary at a Glance

      The authors verified the application of the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) in predicting overall and cardiovascular mortality in 201 prevalent hemodialysis subjects, and showed that the addition of ankle-brachial index and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity measurements improved the predictive value.

  4. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE

    1. Top of page
    2. KHA CARI GUIDELINES
    3. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    6. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE
    7. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Residual proteinuria and eGFR predict progression of renal impairment within 2 years in type 2 diabetic patients with nephropathy who are receiving optimal treatment with angiotensin receptor blockers (pages 516–524)

      Sara E Ivory, David K Packham, Anne T Reutens, Rory Wolfe, Richard D Rohde, Julia Lewis, Robert C Atkins and on behalf of the Collaborative Study Group

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12053

      Summary at a Glance

      This study examines the value of traditional markers of risk progression in diabetic nephropathy (proteinuria and eGFR) after maximal angiotensin receptor blockade therapy has been instituted. They demonstrated, by combining the long-term follow-up of two large intervention studies (IDNT and OVERT), that the magnitude of proteinuria even after maximal ARB therapy, is a significant risk factor for subsequent decline in renal function.

  5. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    1. Top of page
    2. KHA CARI GUIDELINES
    3. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    6. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE
    7. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Is bigger better? A retrospective analysis of native renal biopsies with 16 Gauge versus 18 Gauge automatic needles (pages 525–530)

      Jun Mai, Jim Yong, Hugh Dixson, Angela Makris, Ananthakrishnapuram Aravindan, Michael G Suranyi and Jeffrey Wong

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12093

      Summary at a Glance

      This is an important practical issue – the appropriate gauge of biopsy needles. This study is large and aims to answer the core question – 16G or 18G.

  6. CORRESPONDENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. KHA CARI GUIDELINES
    3. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    6. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE
    7. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Spurious hypernatraemia (pages 531–532)

      Terry King-Wing Ma, Kai Ming Chow, Bonnie Ching-Ha Kwan, Cheuk Chun Szeto and Philip Kam-To Li

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12067

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