Nephrology

Cover image for Vol. 19 Issue 10

October 2014

Volume 19, Issue 10

Pages 597–662

  1. EDITORIAL ARTICLE

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL ARTICLE
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    6. DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY (CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL)
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. CORRESPONDENCE
  2. REVIEW ARTICLES

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL ARTICLE
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    6. DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY (CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL)
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. You have free access to this content
      Increasing access to kidney transplantation in countries with limited resources: The Indian experience with Kidney Paired Donation (pages 599–604)

      Vivek B Kute, Aruna V Vanikar, Pankaj R Shah, Manoj R Gumber, Himanshu V Patel, Divyesh P Engineer, Pranjal R Modi, Veena R Shah and Hargovind L Trivedi

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12307

      Summary at a Glance

      In countries like India, where a well-organized deceased donor kidney transplantation program is not available, living donor kidney transplantation is the major source of organs for kidney transplantation. Because access to transplantation with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-desensitization protocols and ABO incompatible transplantation is very limited due to high costs and increased risk of infections from more intense immunosuppression, kidney paired donation (KPD) promises hope to a growing number of end stage kidney disease patients. KPD is a rapidly growing and cost-effective living donor kidney transplantation strategy for patients who are incompatible with their healthy, willing living donor. In principle, KPD is feasible for any centre that performs living donor kidney transplantation. KPD does not require extra infrastructure and decreases waiting time.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Immunoglobulin A nephropathy in horseshoe kidney: Case reports and literature review (pages 605–609)

      Panpan Hu, Meiling Jin, Yuansheng Xie, Pu Chen, Xueguang Zhang, Zhong Yin, Guangyan Cai and Xiangmei Chen

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12328

      Summary at a Glance

      This is a valuable report describing two cases with IgA nephropathy on horseshoe kidneys. The authors discuss past reports and emphasize the importance of renal biopsy for horseshoe kidney patients with heavy proteinuria.

  3. DIALYSIS

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL ARTICLE
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    6. DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY (CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL)
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Dialysis outcomes of elderly Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians (pages 610–616)

      Charlotte McKercher, Hoi Wong Chan, Philip A Clayton, Stephen McDonald and Matthew D Jose

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12317

      Summary at a Glance

      This study based on Australian Indigenous and non-Indigenous dialysis patients from ANZDATA shows that elderly Indigenous patients have a 20% higher mortality than non-Indigenous dialysis patients.

  4. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL ARTICLE
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    6. DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY (CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL)
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor usage and acute kidney injury: A secondary analysis of RENAL study outcomes (pages 617–622)

      Amanda Y Wang, Rinaldo Bellomo, Toshiharu Ninomiya, Serigne Lo, Alan Cass, Meg Jardine, Martin Gallagher and for the RENAL Study Investigators and the ANZICS Clinical Trials Group

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12284

      Summary at a Glance

      In this RENAL study cohort, the use of ACEI in AKI during the study was not common and was not significantly associated with reductions in mortality.

  5. DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY (CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL)

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL ARTICLE
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    6. DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY (CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL)
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Polymorphisms in oxidative stress pathway genes and risk of diabetic nephropathy in South Indian type 2 diabetic patients (pages 623–629)

      Parimala Narne, Kamakshi Chaithri Ponnaluri, Mohammed Siraj and Mohammed Ishaq

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12293

      Summary at a Glance

      The authors investigated the contribution of polymorphisms of oxidative stress genes in the development of DN in the South Indian T2DM population. They showed that eNOS and PARP-1 gene variants were associated with increased and reduced susceptibility to DN, respectively.

  6. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL ARTICLE
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    6. DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY (CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL)
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Effects of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene on end stage renal disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (pages 630–637)

      Cheng Xue, Chen-chen Zhou, Li-jun Sun, Liang-liang He, Cheng-gang Xu, Bing Dai and Chang-lin Mei

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12310

      Summary at a Glance

      The genetic mechanisms that underlie the variability in disease phenotype in ADPKD are not entirely clear. In this study, the authors undertake a meta-analysis of published studies on the role of variants of the nitric oxide synthase gene on disease progression.

    2. Deterioration, improvement of kidney function over time and determinants in the Cape Town Bellville South cohort (pages 638–647)

      Tandi E Matsha, David J Soita, Shafick M Hassan, Rajiv T Erasmus and Andre P Kengne

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12313

      Summary at a Glance

      This is a moderate sized cohort in the developing world (South Africa). Although the trends are in the expected directions, the value of this paper lies in the nature of the population studied (mixed ancestry South African). Room also for an editorial on methods.

    3. Prevalence of and risk factors for reduced serum bicarbonate in chronic kidney disease (pages 648–654)

      Kalani L Raphael, Yingying Zhang, Jian Ying and Tom Greene

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12315

      Summary at a Glance

      This well-written interesting study demonstrated the prevalence and factors associated with baseline serum bicarbonate in CKD patients. Present analysis with large and creditable numbers of CKD patients revealed the association with not only degree of albuminuria but also unconventional factors, such as anaemia, smoking, higher serum albumin, higher waist circumference and use of RAS blockers.

    4. Status of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use and its association with chronic kidney disease: A cross-sectional survey in China (pages 655–660)

      Yujing Pan, Luxia Zhang, Fang Wang, Xiaomei Li, Haiyan Wang and on behalf of the China National Survey of Chronic Kidney Disease Working Group

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12318

      Summary at a Glance

      Cross-sectional analyses of NSAID use and the incidence of CKD in a large Chinese population. 3.6% reported regular NSAID intake, of which 76% were taking phenacetin containing analgesics. Long term NSAID use was associated with an OR 2.36 (95%CI 1.28–4.37) of CKD with an eGFR < 60 mL/min per 1.73m2.

  7. CORRESPONDENCE

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL ARTICLE
    3. REVIEW ARTICLES
    4. DIALYSIS
    5. ACUTE RENAL DISEASE
    6. DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY (CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL)
    7. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    8. CORRESPONDENCE
    1. Migratory Skin Lesions in a Renal Transplant Recipient (pages 661–662)

      Sanjay Panda, Maneesh Vijay Kumar, Soumita Bagchi, Geetika Singh, SK Agarwal and Amit Dinda

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12314

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