Nephrology

Cover image for Vol. 19 Issue 3

March 2014

Volume 19, Issue 3

Pages 119–175

  1. REVIEW ARTICLE

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLE
    3. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    4. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    5. TRANSPLANTATION
    6. DIALYSIS
    7. CORRESPONDENCES
    8. CORRIGENDUM
    1. You have free access to this content
      Compensatory responses to nephron deficiency: Adaptive or maladaptive? (pages 119–128)

      Debra Fong, Kate M Denton, Karen M Moritz, Roger Evans and Reetu R Singh

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12198

      Summary at a Glance

      This is a comprehensive review on our current understanding of postnatal functional and structural maturation of a kidney. We further explore how these adaptations in the setting of abnormal kidney development or loss of a kidney which result in low nephron number can lead to maladaptive phenotypes such as renal failure and hypertension later in life.

  2. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLE
    3. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    4. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    5. TRANSPLANTATION
    6. DIALYSIS
    7. CORRESPONDENCES
    8. CORRIGENDUM
    1. Implications of the changes in serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and cystatin C in patients with chronic kidney disease (pages 129–135)

      Shui-Juan Shen, Zuo-Xiang Hu, Qing-Hua Li, Shi-Min Wang, Chun-Jiao Song, Dong-Dong Wu, Jian-Ling He, Ji-Chao Guan and Juan-Ping Shan

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12203

      Summary at a Glance

      The authors examined whether neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) could serve as a biomarker to predict the development of acute kidney injury. They found that serum NGAL was significantly correlated with the severity of renal damage and the progression of renal function deterioration.

    2. Myeloperoxidase in chronic kidney disease: Role of visceral fat (pages 136–142)

      Min-Sung Tsai, Huey-Mei Shaw, Yi-Jen Li, Meng-Te Lin, Wen-Tsung Lee and Khee-Siang Chan

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12187

      Summary at a Glance

      Myeloperoxidase associated with body fat in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and not in those without CKD indicating a role of inflammation/oxidative stress linking visceral obesity with CKD. Interesting hypothesis-generating work and good effort, limitations acknowledged.

  3. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLE
    3. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    4. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    5. TRANSPLANTATION
    6. DIALYSIS
    7. CORRESPONDENCES
    8. CORRIGENDUM
    1. Safety of paediatric percutaneous native kidney biopsy and factors predicting bleeding complications (pages 143–148)

      Pornpimol Rianthavorn, Stephen J Kerr and Kanhatai Chiengthong

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12184

      Summary at a Glance

      This study evaluated the safety and identified factors predicting bleeding complications associated with percutaneous native kidney biopsy in 227 patients aged <18 years. The authors found that perirenal hematoma occurred in 58 patients (25%) and macroscopic haematuria occurred in 46 patients (20%). They concluded that percutaneous native kidney biopsy can be safely performed when precautions were taken to prevent bleeding, and selection of biopsy instruments should be tailored according to patient size.

    2. The role of albuminuria as a non-invasive marker for congestive acutely decompensated chronic heart failure and the spironolactone effect in elderly Portuguese: a non-randomized trial (pages 149–156)

      João Pedro Ferreira, Mário Santos, Sofia Almeida, Irene Marques, Paulo Bettencourt and Henrique Carvalho

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12188

      Summary at a Glance

      Non-randomized comparison of 100 patients with non-decompensated acute heart failure on standard therapy with and without spironolactone demonstrated greater reduction of albuminuria from day 1 to day 3 on paired comparison within group. Mechanism unclear, limitations stated, hypothesis generating, needs further study to address the role of albuminuria in heart failure as therapeutic target in future studies.

  4. TRANSPLANTATION

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLE
    3. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    4. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    5. TRANSPLANTATION
    6. DIALYSIS
    7. CORRESPONDENCES
    8. CORRIGENDUM
    1. Complications and outcomes of trimethoprim–sulphamethoxazole as chemoprophylaxis for pneumocystis pneumonia in renal transplant recipients (pages 157–163)

      Nicos Mitsides, Kerry Greenan, Darren Green, Rachel Middleton, Elizabeth Lamerton, Judith Allen, Jane Redshaw, Paul R Chadwick, Chinari PK Subudhi and Grahame Wood

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12201

      Summary at a Glance

      Mitsides et al. describe their experience with giving universal chemoprophylaxis to 290 established renal transplant recipients, following an outbreak of pneumocystis pneumonia in their unit. Complications of their trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole therapy are described, in particular 22% of patients had some rise in their serum creatinine and 2% had leukopaenia.

  5. DIALYSIS

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLE
    3. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    4. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    5. TRANSPLANTATION
    6. DIALYSIS
    7. CORRESPONDENCES
    8. CORRIGENDUM
    1. Hydroxocobalamin supplementation and erythropoisis stimulating agent hyporesponsiveness in haemodialysis patients (pages 164–171)

      John P Killen and Vanessa L Brenninger

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12205

      Summary at a Glance

      The contribution of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency towards the anaemia of dialysis patients is an under recognized problem. This study examines the effect of administration of hydroxycobalamin over 2 years to those on haemodialysis with B12 < 300 pmol/L, and reported a reduction in erythropoietin-stimulating agent requirements.

  6. CORRESPONDENCES

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLE
    3. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    4. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    5. TRANSPLANTATION
    6. DIALYSIS
    7. CORRESPONDENCES
    8. CORRIGENDUM
    1. Chyluria (page 172)

      Yung-Chih Wang and Chia-Chao Wu

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12180

    2. A Chinese girl with novel PLCE1 mutations and proliferation of the mesangium responded to tacrolimus therapy (page 173)

      Tiantian Lin, Jianguo Li, Fenghua Wang, Li Cao, Jianxin Wu, Juan Tu, Lina Ji, Haiyun Geng, Chaoying Chen and Dakun Chen

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12178

  7. CORRIGENDUM

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLE
    3. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    4. GENERAL NEPHROLOGY
    5. TRANSPLANTATION
    6. DIALYSIS
    7. CORRESPONDENCES
    8. CORRIGENDUM
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum (page 175)

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12215

      This article corrects:

      ANZSN Renal Supportive Care Guidelines 2013

      Vol. 18, Issue 6, 401–454, Article first published online: 27 MAY 2013

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