Nephrology

Cover image for Vol. 19 Issue 9

September 2014

Volume 19, Issue 9

Pages 519–596

  1. REVIEW ARTICLES

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLES
    3. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    4. METHODS IN LABORATORY PRACTICE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    7. CORRESPONDENCES
    1. You have free access to this content
      Physiological benefits of exercise in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease (pages 519–527)

      Douglas W Gould, Matthew PM Graham-Brown, Emma L Watson, João L Viana and Alice C Smith

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12285

      Summary at a Glance

      Exercise is accepted as an important intervention in the treatment, prevention and rehabilitation of many chronic diseases, however, the role of exercise in CKD is overlooked, with the provision of rehabilitation programmes well behind those of cardiology and respiratory services. Whilst there is now a large evidence base demonstrating the efficacy and safety of exercise training interventions in patients receiving dialysis, there is a paucity of research evaluating the effectiveness of exercise in patients with CKD who are not on dialysis. This review summarizes what is known about the main effects of exercise in pre-dialysis CKD patients, discusses the potential of exercise in the rehabilitation and treatment of disease and highlights the need for further research.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Spectrum of renal disease in diabetes (pages 528–536)

      Jessie Teng, Karen M Dwyer, Prue Hill, Emily See, Elif I Ekinci, George Jerums and Richard J MacIsaac

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12288

      Summary at a Glance

      This review article highlights the heterogeneity of renal disease in patients with diabetes. The spectrum of renal disease in patients with diabetes encompasses both diabetic kidney disease (including albuminuric and non-albuminuric phenotypes) and non-diabetic kidney disease which can be independent or superimposed on albuminuric diabetic kidney disease. It is important to identifying non-diabetic kidney disease because it is potentially reversible. The clinical features suggestive of non-diabetic kidney disease, which should prompt consideration of renal biopsy, are discussed.

  2. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLES
    3. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    4. METHODS IN LABORATORY PRACTICE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    7. CORRESPONDENCES
    1. NOS3 tagSNPs does not modify the chronic kidney disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (pages 537–541)

      Gnanasambandan Ramanathan, Soundararajan Periyasamy and Bhaskar VKS Lakkakula

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12278

      Summary at a Glance

      The variability in progression to kidney failure in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) could be explained, in part, by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate modifier genes. However, the results of the present study provide further evidence that SNPs in the NOS3 gene are not involved in the progression of ADPKD patients.

    2. Berberine ameliorates renal interstitial fibrosis induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction in rats (pages 542–551)

      Fang-Ming Wang, Yu-jie Yang, Lu-lin Ma, Xiao-jun Tian and Ya-qiang He

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12271

      Summary at a Glance

      Berberine is an isoquinoline quaternary alkaloid isolated from a variety of medicinal plants, which is used as a therapeutic agent for microbial infection in East Asian countries. In the current study, Berberine exhibits an anti-fibrotic activity in the UUO model of renal fibrosis via inhibition of oxidative stress, inflammation and TGF-β1/Smad3 signalling.

  3. METHODS IN LABORATORY PRACTICE

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLES
    3. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    4. METHODS IN LABORATORY PRACTICE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    7. CORRESPONDENCES
    1. A practical guide to subtotal nephrectomy in the rat with subsequent methodology for assessing renal and cardiac function (pages 552–561)

      Yuan Zhang and Andrew R Kompa

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12279

      Summary at a Glance

      This manuscript provides a comprehensive guide for performing the subtotal nephrectomy model in rats and includes methodology for assessing renal and cardiac function in this model. It is a useful methods paper that is well suited to the Nephrology journal.

  4. DIALYSIS

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLES
    3. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    4. METHODS IN LABORATORY PRACTICE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    7. CORRESPONDENCES
    1. Nitric oxide production and blood pressure reduction during haemodialysis (pages 562–567)

      Chiz-Tzung Chang, Ming-Hui Chien, Kai-Liang Yang, Chien-Chih Yu, Jing-Fang Hsu, I-Kuan Wang, Paik-Seong Lim and Chiu-Ching Huang

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12280

      Summary at a Glance

      Intradialytic hypotension is a common problem for haemodialysis patients and is often associated with high ultrafiltration. This interesting study reports on the relationship between nitric oxide production and intradialytic hypotension suggesting determination of dialysate nitric oxide may be used as a predictive tool.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Lower serum fibroblast growth factor-23 levels may suggest malnutrition in maintenance haemodialysis patients (pages 568–573)

      Sonoo Mizuiri, Yoshiko Nishizawa, Kazuomi Yamashita, Kyoka Ono, Maya Oda, Kohji Usui and Kenichiro Shigemoto

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12290

      Summary at a Glance

      In this cross-sectional observational study, lower FGF 23 values were associated with lower phosphate levels and also poorer nutritional status in patients on haemodialysis. Just as an elevated FGF 23 in pre-dialysis patients can be an appropriate response to maintain phosphate homeostasis, our view of high and low FGF 23 on dialysis may need to be more nuanced by context.

  5. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLES
    3. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    4. METHODS IN LABORATORY PRACTICE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    7. CORRESPONDENCES
    1. Annual decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate is a risk factor for cardiovascular events independent of proteinuria (pages 574–580)

      Kei Nagai, Kunihiro Yamagata, Reiko Ohkubo, Chie Saito, Koichi Asahi, Kunitoshi Iseki, Kenjiro Kimura, Toshiki Moriyama, Ichiei Narita, Shouichi Fujimoto, Kazuhiko Tsuruya, Tsuneo Konta, Masahide Kondo and Tsuyoshi Watanabe

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12286

      Summary at a Glance

      Previous studies have shown that annual decline or increment estimated glomerular filtration rate may influence prognosis. This study focuses on the cardiovascular events and demonstrates that the annual decline rate in eGFR is a risk factor for cardiovascular events independent of proteinuria by using a large longitudinal Japanese population-based study of participants receiving annual health checkups from 2008–2010. To reduce the incidence of cardiovascular events in the general population, serial measurement of serum creatinine to obtain the change rate in eGFR is warranted.

    2. Impact of routine reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rate using the CKD-EPI formula in a community population: A cross-sectional cohort study (pages 581–586)

      Tim Mitchell, Narelle Hadlow and Aron Chakera

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12283

      Summary at a Glance

      This manuscript suggests that introduction of routine estimated glomerular filtration rate reporting using the CKD-EPI formula will reduce the population prevalence of CKD and better identifies patients at risk of further decline in renal function. The improvement in the classification should reduce unnecessary costs related to surveillance and referral.

    3. Renal unit characteristics and patient education practices that predict a high prevalence of home-based dialysis in Australia (pages 587–593)

      Debbie Fortnum, Marie Ludlow and Rachael L Morton

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12274

      Summary at a Glance

      This manuscript describes predialysis practice patterns and their influence on uptake of home-based dialysis treatment. Insights into factors associated with an increased prevalence of home dialysis are provided and supported by statistical analysis.

  6. CORRESPONDENCES

    1. Top of page
    2. REVIEW ARTICLES
    3. PROGRESSIVE CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE
    4. METHODS IN LABORATORY PRACTICE
    5. DIALYSIS
    6. REGISTRIES/RENAL EPIDEMIOLOGY
    7. CORRESPONDENCES
    1. An Audit of Dapsone-associated Methaemoglobinaemia in Renal Transplant Recipients (pages 594–595)

      Roshini Malasingam, Dwarakanathan Ranganathan, Lakshmanan Jeyaseelan, Kavitha Ramanathan, Margaret Jacks, Julie Owens and George T. John

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12291

    2. Successful Treatment of Hepatitis B Virus-associated Membranous Nephropathy with Entecavir and Immunosuppressive Agents (pages 595–596)

      Akinobu Ochi, Eiji Ishimura, Mitsuru Ichii, Yoshiteru Ohno, Shinya Nakatani, Ikue Kobayashi, Hideaki Shima, Akihiro Tsuda, Kaori Shidara, Katsuhito Mori, Akihiro Tamori and Masaaki Inaba

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nep.12292

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