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Keywords:

  • Axial back pain;
  • failed back surgery syndrome;
  • high frequency;
  • low back pain;
  • neuromodulation;
  • neurostimulation;
  • spinal cord stimulation

Objectives

To examine the feasibility of novel high-frequency spinal cord stimulation therapy in a cohort of patients with chronic predominant back pain during a four day, percutaneous trial.

Design

Prospective, multicenter open label pilot trial. Setting and Patients: Twenty-four patients with back pain greater than leg pain who were candidates for spinal cord stimulation were trialed at five U.S. centers.

Interventions

Patients completed a percutaneous trial with a commercially available spinal cord stimulator. The implanted leads were then connected to the novel external stimulation device and patients were trialed for an additional four days.

Outcome Measures

Pain intensity ratings, subjective descriptions, and patients' preference.

Results

There was significant improvement from baseline in overall pain scores (8.68 to 2.03, [p < 0.001]) and back pain scores (8.12 to 1.88, [p < 0.001]) with the investigational stimulation. The investigational stimulation was preferred to the commercially available systems in 21 of 24 patients (88%).

Conclusions

Patients with predominant back pain reported a substantial reduction in overall pain and back pain when trialed with high-frequency spinal cord stimulation therapy.