Self-efficacy as a unifying construct in nursing-social work collaboration with vulnerable populations

Authors


David P. Moxley, Anne and Henry Zarrow School of Social Work, University of Oklahoma Norman, 3908 Western View Drive, Norman, OK 73072, USA. E-mail: <david.moxley@ou.edu>

Abstract

WASHINGTON OGM and MOXLEY DP. Nursing Inquiry 2013; 20: 42–50
Self-efficacy as a unifying construct in nursing-social work collaboration with vulnerable populations

The authors consider self-efficacy practice as an organizing construct guiding nursing–social work action research in partnership with older homeless and formerly homeless African-American women. The authors, both academics who together have worked with members of this vulnerable population for a decade and a half, report on their unifying action research perspective immersed in self-efficacy theory. We examine how our adaptations of Bandura’s classic four sources of self-efficacy form a distinctive intervention practice designed to help older African-American women emerge from homelessness. We amplify the incorporation of the four sources (vicarious experience and exposure to powerful role models, emotional arousal and accompanying catharsis, verbal persuasion, and role performance) into a grand strategy useful in working collaboratively with members of vulnerable populations, so they can achieve outcomes that improve their functional health, well-being and ultimately their quality of life.

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