Neurogastroenterology & Motility

Cover image for Vol. 25 Issue 10

October 2013

Volume 25, Issue 10

Pages 779–857, e640–e697

  1. EDITORIAL

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. VIEWPOINT
    4. REVIEW ARTICLE
    5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    6. TECHNICAL NOTE
    7. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    8. ERRATA
    9. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    1. Neurogastroenterology and Motility's impact factor (page 779)

      Gianrico Farrugia, Gary Mawe, Magnus Simren, Sylvie Bradesi and Arjan Bredenoord

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12215

  2. VIEWPOINT

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. VIEWPOINT
    4. REVIEW ARTICLE
    5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    6. TECHNICAL NOTE
    7. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    8. ERRATA
    9. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
  3. REVIEW ARTICLE

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. VIEWPOINT
    4. REVIEW ARTICLE
    5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    6. TECHNICAL NOTE
    7. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    8. ERRATA
    9. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    1. Pathophysiology of gastro-esophageal reflux disease: a role for mucosa integrity? (pages 783–799)

      R. Farré

      Version of Record online: 12 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12201

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is very prevalent. Nevertheless, pathophysiology is complex and not well understood. Several mechanisms have been proposed but the ultimate phenomenon is that mucosal epithelium is most of the times abnormally exposed to luminal agents leading to an impaired mucosal integrity. Methodologies used for the evaluation of mucosal integrity, its relevance in erosive esophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease, its involvement in symptoms perception and the effect of luminal and endogenous factors will be discussed.

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. VIEWPOINT
    4. REVIEW ARTICLE
    5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    6. TECHNICAL NOTE
    7. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    8. ERRATA
    9. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    1. Influence of gastric emptying on gastro-esophageal reflux: a combined pH-impedance study (pages 800–e634)

      G. Gourcerol, Y. Benanni, E. Boueyre, A. M. Leroi and P. Ducrotte

      Version of Record online: 12 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12181

    2. Electroacupuncture improves burn-induced impairment in gastric motility mediated via the vagal mechanism in rats (pages 807–e635)

      J. Song, J. Yin, H. S. Sallam, T. Bai, Y. Chen and J. D. Z. Chen

      Version of Record online: 12 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12183

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      EA at ST-36 improves burn-induced gastric dysrhythmia, decreases plasma IL-6 and improves delayed GE in burn rats. The ameliorating effects of EA at ST-36 on delayed GE in burn rats seem to be mediated via the vagal pathway involving IL-6. EA may have a therapeutic potential for treating gastric dysmotility in severe burns.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Gastric electrical stimulation with Enterra therapy improves symptoms of idiopathic gastroparesis (pages 815–e636)

      R. W. McCallum, I. Sarosiek, H. P. Parkman, W. Snape, F. Brody, J. Wo and T. Nowak

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12185

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract
    4. Patterns of diet-related practices and prevalence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (pages 831–e638)

      A. Esmaillzadeh, A. H. Keshteli, A. Feizi, F. Zaribaf, C. Feinle-Bisset and P. Adibi

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12192

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In a cross-sectional study in 4763 adults, diet-related practices were assessed in four domains, “meal pattern”, “eating rate”, “intra-meal fluid intake” and “meal-to-sleep interval”, using a pre-tested questionnaire. LCA was applied to identify classes of diet-related practices. After adjustment for potential confounders, subjects with “irregular meal pattern” had higher odds of GERD compared with subjects with “regular meal pattern”. “Long meal-to-sleep interval” was inversely associated with GERD compared with “short meal-to-sleep interval”.

    5. Postprandial cardiac vagal tone and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (TLESR) (pages 841–e639)

      P. Kuo, I. Bravi, U. Marreddy, Q. Aziz and D. Sifrim

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12195

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The number of TLESR and reflux episodes is greatly increased after a meal, but this is accompanied by a paradoxical decline in cardiac vagal tone, considering that TLESR is a vagally-mediated phenomenon. This observation should be further explore in reflux patients.

  5. TECHNICAL NOTE

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. VIEWPOINT
    4. REVIEW ARTICLE
    5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    6. TECHNICAL NOTE
    7. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    8. ERRATA
    9. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    1. The presence of 5-HT in myenteric varicosities is not due to uptake of 5-HT released from the mucosa during dissection: use of a novel method for quantifying 5-HT immunoreactivity in myenteric ganglia (pages 849–853)

      D. J Keating, H. Peiris, M. Kyloh, S. J. H. Brookes and N. J. Spencer

      Version of Record online: 31 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12189

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We wished to ascertain whether experimental manipulation such as dissection and temperature, or physiological activity, can affect the presence of 5-HT in the myenteric plexus. To so this we developed a method for quantifying immunohistochemical images of 5-HT in this tissue. We find punctate expression of 5-HT in myenteric plexus ganglia, the density of which is not altered by dissection or temperature but which is increased by pellet-induced peristalsis and by exogenous 5-HT.

  6. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. VIEWPOINT
    4. REVIEW ARTICLE
    5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    6. TECHNICAL NOTE
    7. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    8. ERRATA
    9. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    1. Mucosal permeability testing: response (page 855)

      I. R. Sequeira, R. G. Lentle, M. C. Kruger and R. D. Hurst

      Version of Record online: 3 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12178

  7. ERRATA

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. VIEWPOINT
    4. REVIEW ARTICLE
    5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    6. TECHNICAL NOTE
    7. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    8. ERRATA
    9. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum (page 856)

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12235

      This article corrects:
    2. You have free access to this content
      Erratum (page 857)

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12237

      This article corrects:

      Altered colonic function and microbiota profile in a mouse model of chronic depression

      Vol. 25, Issue 9, 733–e575, Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2013

  8. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. VIEWPOINT
    4. REVIEW ARTICLE
    5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    6. TECHNICAL NOTE
    7. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    8. ERRATA
    9. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    1. Low-resolution colonic manometry leads to a gross misinterpretation of the frequency and polarity of propagating sequences: Initial results from fiber-optic high-resolution manometry studies (pages e640–e649)

      P. G. Dinning, L. Wiklendt, I. Gibbins, V. Patton, P. Bampton, D. Z. Lubowski, I. J. Cook and J. W. Arkwright

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12170

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper provides evidence to support the use of high-resolution manometry for recording human intra-luminal colonic contractions. These data indicate that closely spaced pressure recording sites (<2cm) are mandatory to avoid gross misrepresentation of the frequency, morphology and directionality of colonic propagating sequences.

    2. Autonomic response to a visceral stressor is dysregulated in irritable bowel syndrome and correlates with duration of disease (pages e650–e659)

      P. Cheng, W. Shih, M. Alberto, A. P. Presson, A. Licudine, E. A. Mayer, B. D. Naliboff and L. Chang

      Version of Record online: 3 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12177

    3. Identifying spinal sensory pathways activated by noxious esophageal acid (pages e660–e668)

      A. M. Harrington, S. M. Brierley, N. J. Isaacs, R. L. Young and L. Ashley Blackshaw

      Version of Record online: 12 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12180

    4. Treatment of experimental esophagogastric myotomy with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model (pages e669–e679)

      B. Mazzanti, B. Lorenzi, P. Lorenzoni, A. Borghini, M. Boieri, M. Lorenzi, M. Santosuosso, A. Bosi, R. Saccardi, E. Weber and F. Pessina

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12182

    5. Non-transplantation surgical approach for chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction: analysis of 63 adult consecutive cases (pages e680–e686)

      C. Sabbagh, A. Amiot, L. Maggiori, O. Corcos, F. Joly and Y. Panis

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12191

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Surgical management of CIPO patients is difficult, considering high postoperative morbidity and mortality and frequent re-operation. Attempts should be made to avoid surgery when possible, especially intestinal resection and optimize nutritional status and scheduled procedures.

    6. Roles of M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors in the generation of rhythmic motor activity in mouse small intestine (pages e687–e697)

      Y. Tanahashi, N. Waki, T. Unno, H. Matsuyama, S. Iino, T. Kitazawa, M. Yamada and S. Komori

      Version of Record online: 28 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12194

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The roles of M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes in the regulation of gut motor activity remain to be elucidate. We simultaneously recorded changes in the intraluminal pressure and longitudinal tension in small intestinal segments from M2 or M3 receptor knockout and wild-type mice. The results has demonstrated that M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors differentially regulate the intestinal motor activity: M2 receptors play an essential role in the generation of rhythmic motor activity, and M3 receptors have a modulatory role in controlling the periodicity of the rhythmic activity together with the ICC-MY.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION