Neurogastroenterology & Motility

Cover image for Vol. 25 Issue 9

September 2013

Volume 25, Issue 9

Pages 713–777, e581–e633

  1. VIEWPOINT

    1. Top of page
    2. VIEWPOINT
    3. REVIEW ARTICLE
    4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    5. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    1. You have free access to this content
      Melancholic microbes: a link between gut microbiota and depression? (pages 713–719)

      T. G. Dinan and J. F. Cryan

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12198

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      There is a growing awareness of the potential for microbiota to influence gut-brain communication in health and disease. Efforts are now turning to investigate the role of microbiota in animal models of psychopathology. Intriguingly alterations in microbiota composition is being demonstrated across a variety of models of chronic stress and depression. Large-scale metagenomic analysis of microbiota in depressed populations is now warrented.

  2. REVIEW ARTICLE

    1. Top of page
    2. VIEWPOINT
    3. REVIEW ARTICLE
    4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    5. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    1. Top of page
    2. VIEWPOINT
    3. REVIEW ARTICLE
    4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    5. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Altered colonic function and microbiota profile in a mouse model of chronic depression (pages 733–e575)

      A. J. Park, J. Collins, P. A. Blennerhassett, J. E. Ghia, E. F. Verdu, P. Bercik and S. M. Collins

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12153

      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Erratum

      Vol. 25, Issue 10, 857, Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2013

    2. Abdominal pain is associated with anxiety and depression scores in a sample of the general adult population with no signs of organic gastrointestinal disease (pages 741–e576)

      S. A. Walter, M. P. Jones, N. J. Talley, L. Kjellström, H. Nyhlin, A. N. Andreasson and L. Agréus

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12155

    3. MR imaging in Crohn's disease: correlation of MR motility measurement with histopathology in the terminal ileum (pages 749–e577)

      J. L. Cullmann, S. Bickelhaupt, J. M. Froehlich, Z. SZUCS-FARKAS, R. Tutuian, N. Patuto, H. Dawson and M. A. Patak

      Version of Record online: 7 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12162

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      Comparing alterations of small bowel motility in the terminal ileum with histopathological changes occuring in patients suffering from Crohn`s disease.

    4. Characterization of IBS-like symptoms in patients with ulcerative colitis in clinical remission (pages 756–e578)

      B. Jonefjäll, H. Strid, L. Öhman, J. Svedlund, A. Bergstedt and M. Simren

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12163

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      Percentage of UC patients with active disease and patients in remission with (UCR+IBS) and without (UCR) IBS-like symptoms at three yearly follow up visits after disease onset.

    5. Normal values for esophageal high-resolution manometry (pages 762–e579)

      A. Bogte, A. J. Bredenoord, J. Oors, P. D. Siersema and A. J. P. M. Smout

      Version of Record online: 12 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12167

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      Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is a novel method to assess esophageal motility. Several software and hardware systems are currently available. A set of normal values for HRM parameters was established in the US, using proprietary tactile-sensing catheter technology (Given Imaging). In this article, normal values for HRM performed with another type of catheter (Unisensor) were established.

    6. Exploration of the effects of gender and mild esophagitis on esophageal pain thresholds in the normal and sensitized state of asymptomatic young volunteers (pages 766–e580)

      A. L. Krarup, J. Gunnarsson, J. Brun, A. Poulakis, A. Edebo, G. Ringström, A. M. Drewes and M. Simrén

      Version of Record online: 3 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12172

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      35 healthy asymptomatic volunteers underwent upper GI endoscopy, 24h pH/impedance, and multimodal esophageal pain stimulation. Men had higher pain thresholds to distension and acid. 14 had mild esophagitis. Gender, not mild esophagitis tended to influence mechanical and chemical esophageal pain.

  4. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

    1. Top of page
    2. VIEWPOINT
    3. REVIEW ARTICLE
    4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    5. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    1. Esophageal high resolution manometry in a community practice (pages 776–777)

      C. P. Gyawali, A. J. Bredenoord, J. L. Conklin, M. Fox, J. E. Pandolfino, J. H. Peters, S. Roman, A. Staiano and M. F. Vaezi

      Version of Record online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12175

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    1. Top of page
    2. VIEWPOINT
    3. REVIEW ARTICLE
    4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    5. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    1. Receptors and mechanisms mediating the biphasic response evoked by bradykinin in rat colonic smooth muscle (pages e581–e590)

      L. Würner and M. Diener

      Version of Record online: 7 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12165

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      We provide here a new mechanism of action how bradykinin affects gastrointestinal motility involving bradykinin B2 receptors, inducible B1 receptors and paracrine actions on neighbouring cells within the intestinal wall.

    2. Esophagogastric Junction pressure morphology: comparison between a station pull-through and real-time 3D-HRM representation (pages e591–e598)

      F. Nicodème, Z. Lin, J. E. Pandolfino and P. J. Kahrilas

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12168

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      Esophagogastric junction (EGJ) competence is the fundamental defense against reflux making it of great clinical significance. Real-time 3D EGJ recordings found that the dominant constituents of EGJ pressure at rest were attributable to the diaphragm. 3D-HRM permits real-time recording of EGJ pressure morphology facilitating analysis of the EGJ constituents responsible for its function as a reflux barrier making it a promising tool in the study of GERD pathophysiology.

    3. Ghrelin is involved in the paracrine communication between neurons and glial cells (pages e599–e608)

      B. Avau, B. De Smet, T. Thijs, A. Geuzens, J. Tack, P. Vanden Berghe and I. Depoortere

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12171

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      Fluo-4 AM Ca2+ imaging and immunofluorescence stainings were used to study the effects of ghrelin on the interaction between neurons and glial cells in cultures of the rat nodose ganglia. Ghrelin induced only Ca2+ responses in glial cells, while neurons stained more intensively for the ghrelin receptor. Pharmacological studies revealed that NO, released by the neurons, is the neurotransmitter responsible for activation of the glial cells.

    4. Differential expression of genes related to purinergic signaling in smooth muscle cells, PDGFRα-positive cells, and interstitial cells of Cajal in the murine colon (pages e609–e620)

      L. E. Peri, K. M. Sanders and V. N. Mutafova-Yambolieva

      Version of Record online: 30 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12174

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      Smooth muscle cells, interstitial cells of Cajal and cells expressing platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha+ cells) in murine colon tunica muscularis demonstrate differential expression of genes for proteins involved in purinergic signaling. Therefore, each cell type likely serves specific functions in mediating responses to extracellular purine neurotransmitters and paracrine mediators.

    5. Alpha-synuclein expression patterns in the colonic submucosal plexus of the aging Fischer 344 rat: implications for biopsies in aging and neurodegenerative disorders? (pages e621–e633)

      R. J. Phillips, F. N. Martin, C. N. Billingsley and T. L. Powley

      Version of Record online: 30 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12176

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      This experiment assessed normative expression patterns of alpha-synuclein (SYNC), including ganglionic remodeling and development of SYNC pathologies, in the submucosal plexus (SMP) of the colon during healthy aging. The general age-associated pattern across different cell counts was an increase in the number of SYNC+ neurons between 4 and 8 months of age, with progressively decreasing numbers of both SYNC+ and SYNC− neurons over the remaining lifespan. Changes in SYNC expression occur with age.

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