Neurogastroenterology & Motility

Cover image for Vol. 26 Issue 2

February 2014

Volume 26, Issue 2

Pages i–ii, 149–294

  1. ISSUE INFORMATION

    1. Top of page
    2. ISSUE INFORMATION
    3. MINI-REVIEW
    4. REVIEW ARTICLE
    5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    6. TECHNICAL NOTE
    1. You have free access to this content
      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 19 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12278

  2. MINI-REVIEW

    1. Top of page
    2. ISSUE INFORMATION
    3. MINI-REVIEW
    4. REVIEW ARTICLE
    5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    6. TECHNICAL NOTE
    1. Ghrelin and motilin receptor agonists: time to introduce bias into drug design (pages 149–155)

      G. J. Sanger

      Version of Record online: 19 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12300

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      Differences in how different ghrelin and motilin receptor agonists interact with their receptors are discussed, highlighting the possibility that therapeutic success might be achieved by (a) considering the development of biased agonists at these receptors and (b) for ghrelin, reevaluating the therapeutic target to embrace chronic constipation and nausea as well as just disorders associated with delayed gastric emptying.

  3. REVIEW ARTICLE

    1. Top of page
    2. ISSUE INFORMATION
    3. MINI-REVIEW
    4. REVIEW ARTICLE
    5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    6. TECHNICAL NOTE
    1. On the fiftieth anniversary Postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome: mechanisms related to pathogens (pages 156–167)

      M. Grover, M. Camilleri, K. Smith, D. R. Linden and G. Farrugia

      Version of Record online: 19 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12304

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      Acute virulence of C. jejuni is mediated by adherence to basolateral surfaces, protein secretion, invasion, and intracellular survival. Chronic gastrointestinal manifestations seen in PI-IBS may result from persistent alterations in commensal gut microbiota, dysregulation of tight junction function and increased commensal translocation, enterochromaffin cell activation, and altered enterocyte function.

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    1. Top of page
    2. ISSUE INFORMATION
    3. MINI-REVIEW
    4. REVIEW ARTICLE
    5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    6. TECHNICAL NOTE
    1. Inter- and intra-rater reproducibility of automated and integrated pressure-flow analysis of esophageal pressure-impedance recordings (pages 168–175)

      W. O. Rohof, J. C. Myers, F. A. Estremera, L. S. Ferris, J. van de Pol, G. E. Boeckxstaens and T. I. Omari

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12246

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      Automated impedance manometry pressure-flow analysis (AIM analysis) determines pressure measurements relative to bolus flow. Here, we demonstrated that esophageal AIM analysis is highly reproducible, independent of an observer's level of experience in esophageal motility. Therefore, AIM analysis produces data that are reliable for clinical and research purposes.

    2. Effects and mechanisms of gastric electrical stimulation on visceral pain in a rodent model of gastric hyperalgesia secondary to chemically induced mucosal ulceration (pages 176–186)

      Y. Sun, Y. Tan, G. Song and J. D. Z. Chen

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12248

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      GES with optimal parameters inhibits visceral pain; the analgesic effect of GES on visceral pain is mediated via the endogenous opioid system and the suppression of spinal afferent neuronal activities.

    3. Effect of nortriptyline on brain responses to painful esophageal acid infusion in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (pages 187–195)

      C. M. Forcelini, J. C. Tomiozzo Jr., R. Farré, L. Van Oudenhove, S. M. Callegari-Jacques, M. Ribeiro, B. H. Madalosso and F. Fornari

      Version of Record online: 4 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12251

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      This is a randomized clinical trial designed to compare the effect of nortriptyline with that of placebo on brain response to painful esophageal acid infusion in NERD patients evaluated with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Secondary objectives were to evaluate clinical parameters. Nortriptyline had a stronger attenuation in brain response to esophageal acid infusion, but without clinical advantage over placebo.

    4. Neuroimmune interactions at different intestinal sites are related to abdominal pain symptoms in children with IBS (pages 196–204)

      G. Di Nardo, G. Barbara, S. Cucchiara, C. Cremon, R. J. Shulman, S. Isoldi, L. Zecchi, L. Drago, S. Oliva, R. Saulle, M. R. Barbaro and L. Stronati

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12250

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      The relevance of mast cells and neuroimmune interaction in children with IBS is still unknown. We assessed in the ileal and colonic mucosa of children with IBS mast cell infiltration, mast cell-nerve interactions, and their correlations with symptoms. The number of mast cells in close proximity to nerves both in the ileal and colonic mucosa was increased and related to the intensity and frequency of abdominal pain.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Novel MRI tests of orocecal transit time and whole gut transit time: studies in normal subjects (pages 205–214)

      G. Chaddock, C. Lam, C. L. Hoad, C. Costigan, E. F. Cox, E. Placidi, I. Thexton, J. Wright, P. E. Blackshaw, A. C. Perkins, L. Marciani, P. A. Gowland and R. C. Spiller

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12249

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      Comparison of novel MRI methods for measuring both orocecal transit time and whole gut transit time.

    6. Assessment of esophageal dysfunction and symptoms during and after a standardized test meal: development and clinical validation of a new methodology utilizing high-resolution manometry (pages 215–228)

      R. Sweis, A. Anggiansah, T. Wong, G. Brady and M. Fox

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12252

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      Inclusion of test meal to HRM protocol reveals symptomatic dysmotility.

    7. Impairment of the proximal to distal tonic gradient in the human diabetic stomach (pages 229–236)

      Y. W. Min, Y. S. Hong, E.-J. Ko, J. Y. Lee, B.-H. Min, T. S. Sohn, J. J. Kim and P.-L. Rhee

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12253

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      On the contrary to non-diabetic control, the proximal to distal tonic gradient was not observed in diabetic stomach. Diabetic stomach also had lower frequency of spontaneous contraction in the distal stomach and less acetylcholine-induced positive inotropic effect in the proximal stomach than control.

    8. Mucosal adenosine triphosphate mediates serotonin release from ileal but not colonic guinea pig enterochromaffin cells (pages 237–246)

      B. A. Patel

      Version of Record online: 4 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12254

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      Mucosal ATP mediates 5-HT release in the ileum but not the colon suggestive for varied mucosal signaling mechanisms in the intestinal tract.

    9. Effects of transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation on anorectal physiology in fecal incontinence: a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over evaluation (pages 247–254)

      G. Bouguen, A. Ropert, F. Lainé, P. Pequin, J. Morcet, J.-F. Bretagne and L. Siproudhis

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12256

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      The impact of TENS on rectal wall is real and lead to decrease rectal adaptation and maximum anal pressure in a model of isobaric distension. These findings offer new insight into the mechanism of action of TENS, suggesting different approach of its use.

    10. Distensibility of the anal canal in patients with idiopathic fecal incontinence: a study with the Functional Lumen Imaging Probe (pages 255–263)

      G. Sørensen, D. Liao, L. Lundby, L. Fynne, S. Buntzen, H. Gregersen, S. Laurberg and K. Krogh

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12258

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      In the present study, we applied the novel functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP) for description of biomechanical properties of the anal canal in patients with idiopathic fecal incontinence (IFI) and healthy. The biomechanical properties varied along the length of the anal canal. In patients with IFI the middle and distal parts of the anal canal were significantly less resistant to distension than in healthy.

    11. The mechanism of enhanced defecation caused by the ghrelin receptor agonist, ulimorelin (pages 264–271)

      R. V. Pustovit, B. Callaghan, S. Kosari, L. R. Rivera, H. Thomas, J. A. Brock and J. B. Furness

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12259

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      Previous investigations in human showed that ulimorelin, a ghrelin receptor agonist, increased the frequency of bowel movements. The present study used rats to investigate the mode of action of ulimorelin. Intravenous ulimorelin caused propulsive activity and emptying of the colorectum. This was blocked by cutting the pelvic nerves, by hexamethonium and by ghrelin receptor antagonists. Direct application to the lumbosacral defecation centers mimicked the effect of intravenous ulimorelin. The results suggest that ulimorelin and other centrally penetrant ghrelin receptor agonists have potential to treat constipation.

    12. Ghrelin increases vagally mediated gastric activity by central sites of action (pages 272–282)

      E. M. Swartz, K. N. Browning, R. A. Travagli and G. M. Holmes

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12261

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      Gastrointestinal peptides modulate vago-vagal reflex circuitry to the stomach through peripheral activation of the afferent vagus. Our data suggest that, in addition to peripheral activation, ghrelin may directly activate ghrelin receptors within the dorsal vagal complex.

    13. Bodyweight in Patients with Idiopathic Gastroparesis: Roles of Symptoms, Caloric Intake, Physical Activity, and Body Metabolism (pages 283–289)

      C. J. Homko, L. C. Zamora, G. Boden and H. P. Parkman

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12263

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      Comparison of symptoms scores for gastroparesis patients losing weight (LW) to gastroparesis patients gaining weight (GW). GCSI scores (12.9 ± 4.4 vs 19.3 ± 6.3; p < 0.01) as well as in the nausea and vomiting (3.3 ± 2.3 vs 6.4 ± 2.9; p = 0.03) and early satiety/postprandial fullness (8.1 ± 2.8 vs 11.3 ± 3.7; p < 0.01) subscales were lower in GW subjects. There were no significant differences in the bloating subscore or GERD symptoms.

  5. TECHNICAL NOTE

    1. Top of page
    2. ISSUE INFORMATION
    3. MINI-REVIEW
    4. REVIEW ARTICLE
    5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    6. TECHNICAL NOTE
    1. Technical report: an ePRO patient reported outcome program for the evaluation of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (pages 290–294)

      C. D. Gerson and M.-J. Gerson

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12255

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      This article describes a new method for tracking the clinical course of patients with IBS. A computerized program allows patients to complete questionnaires on their computers, with automatic scoring of questionnaires and placement of results on time-line graphs. The graphs are then available for review by patient and physician in the office.

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