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Neurogastroenterology & Motility

Cover image for Vol. 26 Issue 6

June 2014

Volume 26, Issue 6

Pages i–iv, 745–891

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. ANMS Society Announcement
    4. FNM 2014 Meeting Announcement
    5. MINI-REVIEW
    6. REVIEW ARTICLE
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    9. HOT TOPIC
    10. CORRIGENDUM
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      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 23 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12282

  2. ANMS Society Announcement

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. ANMS Society Announcement
    4. FNM 2014 Meeting Announcement
    5. MINI-REVIEW
    6. REVIEW ARTICLE
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    9. HOT TOPIC
    10. CORRIGENDUM
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      ANMS Society Announcement (page iii)

      Version of Record online: 23 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12375

  3. FNM 2014 Meeting Announcement

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. ANMS Society Announcement
    4. FNM 2014 Meeting Announcement
    5. MINI-REVIEW
    6. REVIEW ARTICLE
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    9. HOT TOPIC
    10. CORRIGENDUM
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      FNM 2014 Meeting Announcement (page iv)

      Version of Record online: 23 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12374

  4. MINI-REVIEW

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. ANMS Society Announcement
    4. FNM 2014 Meeting Announcement
    5. MINI-REVIEW
    6. REVIEW ARTICLE
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    9. HOT TOPIC
    10. CORRIGENDUM
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  5. REVIEW ARTICLE

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. ANMS Society Announcement
    4. FNM 2014 Meeting Announcement
    5. MINI-REVIEW
    6. REVIEW ARTICLE
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    9. HOT TOPIC
    10. CORRIGENDUM
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      Treatment for constipation: New and old pharmacological strategies (pages 749–763)

      B. E. Lacy, Z. H. Hussain and F. Mearin

      Version of Record online: 23 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12335

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      Chronic constipation is a highly prevalent, heterogeneous disorder that significantly affects patients' lives. This monograph will review therapeutic options for the treatment of chronic constipation, including diet, exercise, over-the-counter agents, and prescription medications.

  6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. ANMS Society Announcement
    4. FNM 2014 Meeting Announcement
    5. MINI-REVIEW
    6. REVIEW ARTICLE
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    9. HOT TOPIC
    10. CORRIGENDUM
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      Greater loss of productivity among Japanese workers with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms that persist vs resolve on medical therapy (pages 764–771)

      H. Suzuki, J. Matsuzaki, T. Masaoka and J. M. Inadomi

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12319

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      This study demonstrates that GERD symptom places burden on work productivity despite medical therapy in Japan. Inadequate medication to GERD could be associated with greater loss of productivity.

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      Disease duration determines health-related quality of life in adult eosinophilic esophagitis patients (pages 772–778)

      B. D. van Rhijn, A. J. P. M. Smout and A. J. Bredenoord

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12323

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      We aimed to determine which clinical factors influence the quality of life in EoE patients. We found that the quality of life is impaired in young adult patients with EoE. Compared with a cohort of patients with atopic disease, EoE patients scored similar on most domains. We identified disease duration as a risk factor for a low SF-36 MCS score.

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      Effect of a low-flatulogenic diet in patients with flatulence and functional digestive symptoms (pages 779–785)

      F. Azpiroz, C. Hernandez, D. Guyonnet, A. Accarino, J. Santos, J.-R. Malagelada and F. Guarner

      Version of Record online: 19 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12324

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      Clinical intestinal disorders, colonic motility and disorders, functional disorders.

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      Heterogeneity of mucosal mast cell infiltration in subgroups of patients with esophageal chest pain (pages 786–793)

      H. Lee, H. Chung, J. C. Park, S. K. Shin, S. K. lee and Y. C. Lee

      Version of Record online: 21 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12325

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      Among non-cardiac chest pain patients, increased mucosal mast cell infiltration occurs in subgroups with hypersensitive esophagus and functional chest pain. In subpopulations with overlap with functional dyspepsia or irritable bowel syndrome, esophageal mucosal mast cell counts demonstrated significant positive correlations with duodenal or rectal mucosal mast cell counts.

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      A study of the methodological and clinical validity of the combined lactulose hydrogen breath test with scintigraphic oro-cecal transit test for diagnosing small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in IBS patients (pages 794–802)

      J. Zhao, X. Zheng, H. Chu, J. Zhao, Y. Cong, M. Fried, M. Fox and N. Dai

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12331

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      Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) may have a role in the etiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); however, current diagnostic investigations have important limitations and unknown clinical relevance. Combined LHBT/SOCT appears to be a valid method for non-invasive diagnosis of SIBO in IBS patients. Pilot clinical data suggest that a ≥5 ppm increase in breath H2 prior to the arrival of cecal contrast identifies a subset of IBS patients that have good clinical outcomes following antibiotic therapy.

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      A pilot study of the effects of the somatostatin analog pasireotide in postoperative dumping syndrome (pages 803–809)

      E. Deloose, R. Bisschops, L. Holvoet, J. Arts, D. De Wulf, P. Caenepeel, M. Lannoo, T. Vanuytsel, C. Andrews and J. Tack

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12333

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      Influence of pasireotide on the glycemic response to an oral glucose tolerance test in patients with dumping syndrome, compared to baseline.

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      Natural compounds boldine and menthol are antagonists of human 5-HT3 receptors: implications for treating gastrointestinal disorders (pages 810–820)

      J. Walstab, C. Wohlfarth, R. Hovius, S. Schmitteckert, R. Röth, F. Lasitschka, M. Wink, H. Bönisch and B. Niesler

      Version of Record online: 8 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12334

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      5-HT3 receptor antagonists are effective treatments for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and irritable bowel syndrome. The natural compounds menthol and boldine have been used since ancient times to combat symptoms of these disorders. We show that both compounds act antagonistically at and discriminate between 5-HT3 receptor subtypes, expressed in relevant gastrointestinal regions, making them excellent candidates for follow-up studies.

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      Administration of exogenous acylated ghrelin or rikkunshito, an endogenous ghrelin enhancer, improves the decrease in postprandial gastric motility in an acute restraint stress mouse model (pages 821–831)

      M. Nahata, Y. Saegusa, C. Sadakane, C. Yamada, K. Nakagawa, N. Okubo, S. Ohnishi, T. Hattori, N. Sakamoto and H. Takeda

      Version of Record online: 30 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12336

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      This study aims to elucidate the ameliorating effect of exogenous acylated ghrelin or rikkunshito, a Kampo medicine which acts as a ghrelin enhancer, on gastric dysfunction during acute restraint stress in mice. Administration of acylated ghrelin or rikkunshito improved the restraint stress-induced delayed gastric emptying and decreased antral motility.

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      Diminished vagal tone is a predictive biomarker of necrotizing enterocolitis-risk in preterm infants (pages 832–840)

      K. K. Doheny, C. Palmer, K. N. Browning, P. Jairath, D. Liao, F. He and R. A. Travagli

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12337

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      Prognostic identification of infants at risk for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is required as a matter of urgency. We tested the hypothesis that the high frequency (HF) component of heart rate variability (HRV) representative of vagal tone and the cholinergic anti-inflammatory reflex may be used in infants as a predictive biomarker for NEC-risk before the onset of clinical NEC. Spectral analysis of surface electrocardiogram was done in ‘healthy’ preterm infants at rest on day 5–8 of life and associated with later diagnosis of NEC. The risk (odds ratio) of developing NEC 0.5–20 days in advance of clinical symptoms was 10 per every one SD decrease in HF-HRV (vagal tone). Our preliminary data indicate that HF-HRV may serve as a potential, non-invasive predictive biomarker of NEC-risk in NICU infants.

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      Use of antibiotics in infancy and childhood and risk of recurrent abdominal pain—a Swedish birth cohort study (pages 841–850)

      A. Uusijärvi, A. Bergström, M. Simrén, J. F. Ludvigsson, I. Kull, M. Wickman, J. Alm and O. Olén

      Version of Record online: 8 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12340

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      Recurrent abdominal pain of functional origin (AP) is common in childhood and dysbiosis is considered to be involved in the pathophysiology. Antibiotic treatment is common in childhood and known to influence the intestinal microflora. Treatment with antibiotics is not a major risk factor for AP, but infant girls may have an increased risk if treated with repeated courses of antibiotics.

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      Drugs acting at 5-HT4, D2, motilin, and ghrelin receptors differ markedly in how they affect neuromuscular functions in human isolated stomach (pages 851–861)

      J. Broad, A. Góralczyk, K. Mannur, G. E. Dukes and G. J. Sanger

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12338

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      The abilities of different drug targets to facilitate cholinergic activity were compared in human gastric antrum circular muscle, to clarify mechanisms of action and identify reasons why potential new drugs for gastroparesis sometimes fail in clinical trials. Cholinergically mediated contractions (evoked by electrical stimulation) were strongly increased by camicinal (motilin agonist) and to a lesser extent by metoclopramide (non-selective 5-HT4 agonist) and prucalopride (5-HT4 agonist), but not by domperidone (D2 antagonist) or ghrelin (acylated or des-acyl forms). Drugs which directly facilitate cholinergic activity can increase gastric motility regardless of disease mechanisms. Drugs which have no effects act elsewhere and activity may be disease dependent. These data help define mechanisms of therapeutic activity and introduce the concept that different gastric prokinetic drugs may be effective in different groups of patients.

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      Cortical evoked potentials in response to rapid balloon distension of the rectum and anal canal (pages 862–873)

      S. Haas, C. Brock, K. Krogh, M. Gram, T. D. Nissen, L. Lundby, S. Laurberg and A. M. Drewes

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12341

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      Cortical evoked potential elicited from stimulating the anal canal is reproducible when studying spectral indices. Reproducibility by conventional analysis is hampered by latency jitter, most likely due to the complex anatomy of the region.

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      Appearance of cholinergic myenteric neurons during enteric nervous system development: comparison of different ChAT fluorescent mouse reporter lines (pages 874–884)

      C. S. Erickson, S. J. Lee, A. J. Barlow-Anacker, N. R. Druckenbrod, M. L. Epstein and A. Gosain

      Version of Record online: 8 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12343

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      In the developing enteric nervous system, our observations indicate that neurotransmitter expression occurs early and there is only a brief gap between neurogenesis and neurotransmitter expression. The proportion of ChAT myenteric neurons reaches adult levels during embryonic development, suggesting that the fate of cholinergic neurons is tightly regulated and that their differentiation might influence further neuronal development. ChAT-GFP is a more accurate indicator of early ENS cholinergic neuronal differentiation than the ChAT-Cre;R26R:floxSTOP:tdTomato reporter mouse.

  7. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. ANMS Society Announcement
    4. FNM 2014 Meeting Announcement
    5. MINI-REVIEW
    6. REVIEW ARTICLE
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    9. HOT TOPIC
    10. CORRIGENDUM
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    2. You have free access to this content
      Response to Dr. Lankarani (page 886)

      H. Parkman, M. Carlson and D. Gonyer

      Version of Record online: 23 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12344

  8. HOT TOPIC

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. ANMS Society Announcement
    4. FNM 2014 Meeting Announcement
    5. MINI-REVIEW
    6. REVIEW ARTICLE
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    9. HOT TOPIC
    10. CORRIGENDUM
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      Selective influence of host microbiota on cAMP-mediated ion transport in mouse colon (pages 887–890)

      K. W. Lomasney, A. Houston, F. Shanahan, T. G. Dinan, J. F. Cryan and N. P. Hyland

      Version of Record online: 10 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/nmo.12328

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      With the exception of a heightened response to forskolin, colon from germ-free animals responded in a similar manner as tissues from conventionally housed animals to bethanechol, capsaicin, veratridine, and two commensal organisms.

  9. CORRIGENDUM

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. ANMS Society Announcement
    4. FNM 2014 Meeting Announcement
    5. MINI-REVIEW
    6. REVIEW ARTICLE
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
    9. HOT TOPIC
    10. CORRIGENDUM
    1. You have free access to this content

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