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nph12895-sup-0001-FigS1-S6.pdfapplication/PDF4189K

Fig. S1 Intra-specific and inter-specific variation in leaf reflectance and transmittance spectra in the 400–800-nm wavelength range.

Fig. S2 Ratio of intra-specific to inter-specific variation in leaf reflectance and transmittance spectra of forest sites.

Fig. S3 Standardized weighting coefficients for partial least squares regression (PLSR) for leaf chemical traits and LMA using foliar reflectance spectra.

Fig. S4 Standardized weighting coefficients for partial least squares regression (PLSR) for leaf chemical traits and LMA using foliar transmittance spectra.

Fig. S5 Effects of elevation and soil fertility on site-averaged chemical traits and LMA derived from leaf transmittance spectroscopy.

Fig. S6 Partitioning of the variance for spectranomic traits derived from leaf transmittance spectroscopy.

nph12895-sup-0002-TableS1-S6.docxWord document244K

Table S1 Taxonomic arrangement of samples collected throughout the Andes-to-Amazon region

Table S2 List of canopy tree taxa measured in the study

Table S3 Mean and standard deviation of tree foliar chemical traits at each study site

Table S4 Analysis of variance tests comparing higher and lower fertility soils

Table S5 Relationships between modeled chemical traits and LMA (‘spectranomic traits’) and elevation for higher fertility sites

Table S6 The cumulative effect of combining leaf spectranomic traits based on transmittance in the prediction of tree canopy species using linear discriminant analysis (LDA)