Maintaining distances with the engineer: patterns of coexistence in plant communities beyond the patch-bare dichotomy

Authors

  • David S. Pescador,

    Corresponding author
    1. Departamento de Biología y Geología, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnológicas, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Móstoles, Spain
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  • Julia Chacón-Labella,

    1. Departamento de Biología y Geología, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnológicas, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Móstoles, Spain
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  • Marcelino de la Cruz,

    1. Departamento de Biología y Geología, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnológicas, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Móstoles, Spain
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  • Adrian Escudero

    1. Departamento de Biología y Geología, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnológicas, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Móstoles, Spain
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Summary

  • Two-phase plant communities with an engineer conforming conspicuous patches and affecting the performance and patterns of coexisting species are the norm under stressful conditions.
  • To unveil the mechanisms governing coexistence in these communities at multiple spatial scales, we have developed a new point-raster approach of spatial pattern analysis, which was applied to a Mediterranean high mountain grassland to show how Festuca curvifolia patches affect the local distribution of coexisting species.
  • We recorded 22 111 individuals of 17 plant perennial species. Most coexisting species were negatively associated with F. curvifolia clumps. Nevertheless, bivariate nearest-neighbor analyses revealed that the majority of coexisting species were confined at relatively short distances from F. curvifolia borders (between 0–2 cm and up to 8 cm in some cases).
  • Our study suggests the existence of a fine-scale effect of F. curvifolia for most species promoting coexistence through a mechanism we call ‘facilitation in the halo’. Most coexisting species are displaced to an interphase area between patches, where two opposite forces reach equilibrium: attenuated severe conditions by proximity to the F. curvifolia canopy (nutrient-rich islands) and competitive exclusion mitigated by avoiding direct contact with F. curvifolia.

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