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Nursing Students' Clinical Judgment Regarding Rapid Response: The Influence of a Clinical Simulation Education Intervention

Authors


Correspondence

Pamela Lindsey, DNSc, School of Nursing, Millikin University, Decatur, IL

E-mail: plindsey@millikin.edu

Abstract

Aim

The aim of this study was to examine the impact of a novel educational intervention on student nurses' clinical judgment regarding the management of patients experiencing rapid clinical deterioration.

Method

A randomized sample of baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in the final semester of their program at a midwestern public university participated. All students (N = 79) were pretested; the control group (n = 39) was posttested after receiving traditional code blue and rapid response education. The intervention group (n = 40) was posttested after receiving a novel education intervention.

Results

An independent t-test revealed that nursing students who received the innovative education intervention had significantly higher posttest scores (M = 90.91, standard deviation [SD] = 8.73) than did the nursing students who had not received the intervention (M = 64.80, SD = 19.69), t(77) = 7.65, p <.001).

Conclusions

The findings demonstrate that clinical simulation is effective in improving students' knowledge and clinical judgment, specifically concerning rapid response systems.

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