Sleep Disturbance in Nursing Personnel Working Shifts

Authors

  • Anna Korompeli RN, BSc, MPH, PhD,

    Head RN, Clinical Instructor, Corresponding author
    1. Department of Public Health, Faculty of Nursing, University of Athens, Athens, Greece
    • Intensive Cardiac Unit, Sismanogleio Hospital, Athens, Greece
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  • Tzavara Chara MSc,

    Biostatistician
    1. Center for Health Services Research, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens, Greece
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  • Lemonidou Chrysoula RN, BSc, PhD,

    Professor
    1. Faculty of Nursing, University of Athens, Athens, Greece
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  • Panayota Sourtzi RN, BSc, MmedSc, PhD

    Associate Professor in Occupational Health Nursing
    1. Department of Public Health, Faculty of Nursing, University of Athens, Athens, Greece
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  • Contributions on Study Design: AK and PS; data collection: AK; data analysis and statistical expertise: AK and ChT; critical revisions and supervision: ChL and PS.
  • Conflict of Interest: The authors declare they have no conflict of interest in relation to any aspect of this manuscript.

Correspondence

Anna Korompeli, RN, BSc, MPH, PhD, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Nursing, University of Athens, 12 Notou, 15342 Athens, Greece

E-mail: annabeli76@yahoo.com

Abstract

Objective

The aim of the present study was to explore the factors that are associated with sleep disturbance in nursing personnel working irregular shifts.

Methods

A cross-sectional survey was carried out. The Standard Shiftwork Index was used for data collection, which was completed by 365 nurses and nurse assistants working shifts including nights.

Results

Female nurses and nurses with elevated levels of chronic fatigue were found with greater sleep disturbance between all shifts. Sleep disturbance between most shifts was greater in participants with more than 18 years of working experience and those having family members to look after. No differences were observed in family status, professional training, or circadian characteristics.

Conclusion

Our results suggest that demographics, working characteristics, and family structure are associated with sleep disturbance between shifts in nursing personnel. The modification of shift schedules according to individual needs and preferences is necessary for the reduction of sleeping problems.

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