Systematic review of the evidence for an association between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and risk of obesity

Authors

  • Paula R Trumbo,

    Corresponding author
    1. Nutrition Programs, Office on Nutrition, Labeling and Dietary Supplements, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, College Park, Maryland, USA
    • Correspondence: PR Trumbo, 5100 Paint Branch Parkway HFS-830, College Park, MD 20740, USA. E-mail: Paula.Trumbo@FDA.HHS.gov. Phone: +1-240-402-2579.

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  • Crystal R Rivers

    1. Nutrition Programs, Office on Nutrition, Labeling and Dietary Supplements, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, College Park, Maryland, USA
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Abstract

A systematic review of the evidence for an association between sugar-sweetened beverages and risk of obesity was conducted. This review focused specifically on the role of sugar-sweetened beverages in obesity risk, taking into account energy balance. For the purpose of this review, scientific conclusions could not be drawn from the intervention studies that evaluated the relationship between sugar-sweetened beverage intake and obesity risk. Results of observational studies that examined the relationship between sugar-sweetened beverage intake and obesity risk that were adjusted for energy intake and physical activity were inconsistent for each of the three age groups evaluated (children, adolescents, and adults). From this review, evidence for an association between sugar-sweetened beverage intake and obesity risk is inconsistent when adjustment for energy balance is made.

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