Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

Cover image for Vol. 1121 Linking affect to Action: Critical Contributions of the Orbitofrontal Cortex

December 2007

Volume 1121 Linking affect to Action: Critical Contributions of the Orbitofrontal Cortex

Pages xi–xiii, 1–692

  1. Preface

    1. Top of page
    2. Preface
    3. Part I. Defining the Orbitofrontal Cortex across Species
    4. Part II. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Chemosensory Function
    5. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    6. III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    7. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    8. Part IV. Revealing the Orbitofrontal Cortex through the Amygdala and Striatum
    9. Part V. Orbitofrontal Function within the Prefrontal Cortex
    10. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    11. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    12. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    13. Part VII. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Addiction
    14. Abstract
    15. Index of Contributors
    1. Preface (pages xi–xiii)

      Geoffrey Schoenbaum, Jay A. Gottfried, Elisabeth A. Murray and Seth J. Ramus

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1196/annals.1401.040

  2. Part I. Defining the Orbitofrontal Cortex across Species

    1. Top of page
    2. Preface
    3. Part I. Defining the Orbitofrontal Cortex across Species
    4. Part II. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Chemosensory Function
    5. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    6. III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    7. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    8. Part IV. Revealing the Orbitofrontal Cortex through the Amygdala and Striatum
    9. Part V. Orbitofrontal Function within the Prefrontal Cortex
    10. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    11. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    12. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    13. Part VII. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Addiction
    14. Abstract
    15. Index of Contributors
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  3. Part II. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Chemosensory Function

    1. Top of page
    2. Preface
    3. Part I. Defining the Orbitofrontal Cortex across Species
    4. Part II. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Chemosensory Function
    5. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    6. III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    7. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    8. Part IV. Revealing the Orbitofrontal Cortex through the Amygdala and Striatum
    9. Part V. Orbitofrontal Function within the Prefrontal Cortex
    10. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    11. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    12. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    13. Part VII. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Addiction
    14. Abstract
    15. Index of Contributors
    1. Taste in the Medial Orbitofrontal Cortex of the Macaque (pages 121–135)

      THOMAS C. PRITCHARD, GARY J. SCHWARTZ and THOMAS R. SCOTT

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1196/annals.1401.007

    2. The Role of the Human Orbitofrontal Cortex in Taste and Flavor Processing (pages 136–151)

      DANA M. SMALL, GENEVIEVE BENDER, MARIA G. VELDHUIZEN, KRISTIN RUDENGA, DANIELLE NACHTIGAL and JENNIFER FELSTED

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1196/annals.1401.002

  4. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning

    1. Top of page
    2. Preface
    3. Part I. Defining the Orbitofrontal Cortex across Species
    4. Part II. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Chemosensory Function
    5. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    6. III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    7. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    8. Part IV. Revealing the Orbitofrontal Cortex through the Amygdala and Striatum
    9. Part V. Orbitofrontal Function within the Prefrontal Cortex
    10. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    11. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    12. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    13. Part VII. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Addiction
    14. Abstract
    15. Index of Contributors
    1. Interactions between the Orbitofrontal Cortex and the Hippocampal Memory System during the Storage of Long-Term Memory (pages 216–231)

      SETH J. RAMUS, JENA B DAVIS, RACHEL J DONAHUE, CLAIRE B DISCENZA and ALISSA A. WAITE

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1196/annals.1401.038

  5. III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning

    1. Top of page
    2. Preface
    3. Part I. Defining the Orbitofrontal Cortex across Species
    4. Part II. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Chemosensory Function
    5. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    6. III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    7. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    8. Part IV. Revealing the Orbitofrontal Cortex through the Amygdala and Striatum
    9. Part V. Orbitofrontal Function within the Prefrontal Cortex
    10. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    11. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    12. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    13. Part VII. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Addiction
    14. Abstract
    15. Index of Contributors
  6. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning

    1. Top of page
    2. Preface
    3. Part I. Defining the Orbitofrontal Cortex across Species
    4. Part II. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Chemosensory Function
    5. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    6. III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    7. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    8. Part IV. Revealing the Orbitofrontal Cortex through the Amygdala and Striatum
    9. Part V. Orbitofrontal Function within the Prefrontal Cortex
    10. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    11. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    12. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    13. Part VII. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Addiction
    14. Abstract
    15. Index of Contributors
  7. Part IV. Revealing the Orbitofrontal Cortex through the Amygdala and Striatum

    1. Top of page
    2. Preface
    3. Part I. Defining the Orbitofrontal Cortex across Species
    4. Part II. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Chemosensory Function
    5. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    6. III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    7. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    8. Part IV. Revealing the Orbitofrontal Cortex through the Amygdala and Striatum
    9. Part V. Orbitofrontal Function within the Prefrontal Cortex
    10. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    11. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    12. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    13. Part VII. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Addiction
    14. Abstract
    15. Index of Contributors
    1. Flexible Neural Representations of Value in the Primate Brain (pages 336–354)

      C. DANIEL SALZMAN, JOSEPH J. PATON, MARINA A. BELOVA and SARA E. MORRISON

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1196/annals.1401.034

  8. Part V. Orbitofrontal Function within the Prefrontal Cortex

    1. Top of page
    2. Preface
    3. Part I. Defining the Orbitofrontal Cortex across Species
    4. Part II. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Chemosensory Function
    5. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    6. III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    7. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    8. Part IV. Revealing the Orbitofrontal Cortex through the Amygdala and Striatum
    9. Part V. Orbitofrontal Function within the Prefrontal Cortex
    10. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    11. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    12. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    13. Part VII. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Addiction
    14. Abstract
    15. Index of Contributors
  9. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging

    1. Top of page
    2. Preface
    3. Part I. Defining the Orbitofrontal Cortex across Species
    4. Part II. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Chemosensory Function
    5. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    6. III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    7. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    8. Part IV. Revealing the Orbitofrontal Cortex through the Amygdala and Striatum
    9. Part V. Orbitofrontal Function within the Prefrontal Cortex
    10. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    11. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    12. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    13. Part VII. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Addiction
    14. Abstract
    15. Index of Contributors
    1. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Real-World Decision Making, and Normal Aging (pages 480–498)

      NATALIE L. DENBURG, CATHERINE A. COLE, MICHAEL HERNANDEZ, TORRICIA H. YAMADA, DANIEL TRANEL, ANTOINE BECHARA and ROBERT B. WALLACE

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1196/annals.1401.031

  10. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging

    1. Top of page
    2. Preface
    3. Part I. Defining the Orbitofrontal Cortex across Species
    4. Part II. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Chemosensory Function
    5. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    6. III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    7. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    8. Part IV. Revealing the Orbitofrontal Cortex through the Amygdala and Striatum
    9. Part V. Orbitofrontal Function within the Prefrontal Cortex
    10. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    11. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    12. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    13. Part VII. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Addiction
    14. Abstract
    15. Index of Contributors
  11. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging

    1. Top of page
    2. Preface
    3. Part I. Defining the Orbitofrontal Cortex across Species
    4. Part II. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Chemosensory Function
    5. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    6. III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    7. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    8. Part IV. Revealing the Orbitofrontal Cortex through the Amygdala and Striatum
    9. Part V. Orbitofrontal Function within the Prefrontal Cortex
    10. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    11. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    12. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    13. Part VII. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Addiction
    14. Abstract
    15. Index of Contributors
  12. Part VII. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Addiction

    1. Top of page
    2. Preface
    3. Part I. Defining the Orbitofrontal Cortex across Species
    4. Part II. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Chemosensory Function
    5. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    6. III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    7. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    8. Part IV. Revealing the Orbitofrontal Cortex through the Amygdala and Striatum
    9. Part V. Orbitofrontal Function within the Prefrontal Cortex
    10. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    11. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    12. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    13. Part VII. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Addiction
    14. Abstract
    15. Index of Contributors
    1. The Orbital Prefrontal Cortex and Drug Addiction in Laboratory Animals and Humans (pages 576–597)

      BARRY J. EVERITT, DANIEL M. HUTCHESON, KAREN D. ERSCHE, YANN PELLOUX, JEFFREY W. DALLEY and TREVOR W. ROBBINS

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1196/annals.1401.022

    2. Neural Correlates of Inflexible Behavior in the Orbitofrontal–Amygdalar Circuit after Cocaine Exposure (pages 598–609)

      THOMAS A. STALNAKER, MATTHEW R. ROESCH, DONNA J. CALU, KATHRYN A. BURKE, TEGHPAL SINGH and GEOFFREY SCHOENBAUM

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1196/annals.1401.014

    3. Orbitofrontal Cortex and Cognitive-Motivational Impairments in Psychostimulant Addiction : Evidence from Experiments in the Non-human Primate (pages 610–638)

      PETER OLAUSSON, J. DAVID JENTSCH, DILJA D. KRUEGER, NATALIE C. TRONSON, ANGUS C. NAIRN and JANE R. TAYLOR

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1196/annals.1401.016

  13. Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Preface
    3. Part I. Defining the Orbitofrontal Cortex across Species
    4. Part II. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Chemosensory Function
    5. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    6. III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    7. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    8. Part IV. Revealing the Orbitofrontal Cortex through the Amygdala and Striatum
    9. Part V. Orbitofrontal Function within the Prefrontal Cortex
    10. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    11. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    12. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    13. Part VII. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Addiction
    14. Abstract
    15. Index of Contributors
  14. Index of Contributors

    1. Top of page
    2. Preface
    3. Part I. Defining the Orbitofrontal Cortex across Species
    4. Part II. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Chemosensory Function
    5. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    6. III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    7. Part III. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Associative Learning
    8. Part IV. Revealing the Orbitofrontal Cortex through the Amygdala and Striatum
    9. Part V. Orbitofrontal Function within the Prefrontal Cortex
    10. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    11. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    12. Part VI. The Orbitofrontal Cortex, Mental Health, and Aging
    13. Part VII. The Orbitofrontal Cortex and Addiction
    14. Abstract
    15. Index of Contributors
    1. Index of Contributors (pages 691–692)

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2007 | DOI: 10.1196/annals.1401.auindex_1

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