Post-operative behavioural management in bariatric surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Authors

  • A. Rudolph,

    Corresponding author
    • Integrated Research and Treatment Center AdiposityDiseases, Leipzig University Medical Center, Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, Behavioral Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany
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  • A. Hilbert

    1. Integrated Research and Treatment Center AdiposityDiseases, Leipzig University Medical Center, Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, Behavioral Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Erratum to: post-operative behavioural management in bariatric surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Volume 15, Issue 1, 74–75, Article first published online: 16 December 2013

Address for correspondence: Dr. A Rudolph, Integrated Research and Treatment Center, AdiposityDiseases, Behavioral Medicine, University of Leipzig, Philipp-Rosenthal-Straße 27, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.

E-mail: almut.rudolph@medizin.uni-leipzig.de

Summary

Recent research has provided evidence that bariatric surgery maximizes long-term weight loss in patients with severe obesity. However, a substantial number of patients experience poor weight loss outcome and weight regain over time. Post-operative behavioural management may facilitate long-term weight control in bariatric surgery population. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the effects of post-operative behavioural management on weight loss following bariatric surgery. Eligible articles were systematically searched in electronic databases. Among the 414 citations, five randomized controlled trials, two prospective and eight retrospective cohort trials analysing behavioural lifestyle interventions and support groups fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The main finding is that behavioural management had a positive effect on weight loss following surgery. In 13 studies, patients receiving behavioural management had greater weight loss than patients receiving usual care or no treatment. A meta-analysis of five randomized controlled trials suggests greater weight loss in patients with behavioural lifestyle interventions compared with control groups. Post-operative behavioural management has the potential to facilitate optimal weight loss following bariatric surgery, but conclusions were limited by the small and heterogeneous samples of studies. A more rigorous empirical evaluation on its clinical significance is warranted to improve effectiveness of bariatric surgery.

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