Monitoring food and non-alcoholic beverage promotions to children

Authors

  • B. Kelly,

    Corresponding author
    • School of Health and Society, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia
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    • Members of the writing group for this manuscript are listed in order of their contribution to the writing of the manuscript.
  • L. King,

    1. Prevention Research Collaboration, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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    • Members of the writing group for this manuscript are listed in order of their contribution to the writing of the manuscript.
  • L. Baur,

    1. Prevention Research Collaboration, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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    • Members of the writing group for this manuscript are listed in order of their contribution to the writing of the manuscript.
  • M. Rayner,

    1. British Heart Foundation Health Promotion Research Group, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
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    • Members of the writing group for this manuscript are listed in order of their contribution to the writing of the manuscript.
  • T. Lobstein,

    1. International Association for the Study of Obesity, London, United Kingdom
    2. Public Health Advocacy Institute of Western Australia, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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    • Members of the writing group for this manuscript are listed in order of their contribution to the writing of the manuscript.
  • C. Monteiro,

    1. School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
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    • Members of the writing group for this manuscript are listed in order of their contribution to the writing of the manuscript.
  • J. Macmullan,

    1. Consumers International, London, United Kingdom
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    • Members of the writing group for this manuscript are listed in order of their contribution to the writing of the manuscript.
  • S. Mohan,

    1. Public Health Foundation of India, New Delhi, India
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    • Members of the writing group for this manuscript are listed in order of their contribution to the writing of the manuscript.
  • S. Barquera,

    1. National Insitute of Public Health, Mexico City, Mexico
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  • S. Friel,

    1. National Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
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  • C. Hawkes,

    1. World Cancer Research Fund International, London, United Kingdom
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  • S. Kumanyika,

    1. Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America
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  • M. L'Abbé,

    1. Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
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  • A. Lee,

    1. School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    2. School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
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  • J. Ma,

    1. Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CCDC), Beijing, China
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  • B. Neal,

    1. The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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  • G. Sacks,

    1. WHO Collaborating Centre for Obesity Prevention, Deakin University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • D. Sanders,

    1. School of Public Health, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa
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  • W. Snowdon,

    1. WHO Collaborating Centre for Obesity Prevention, Deakin University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    2. Pacific Research Centre for the Prevention of Obesity and Non-communicable Diseases (C-POND), Suva, Fiji
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  • B. Swinburn,

    1. WHO Collaborating Centre for Obesity Prevention, Deakin University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    2. School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • S. Vandevijvere,

    1. School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • C. Walker,

    1. Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN), Geneva, Switzerland
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  • INFORMAS

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    • INFORMAS is the International Network for Food and Obesity/non-communicable diseases Research, Monitoring and Action Support. All authors who are not members of the writing group are listed in alphabetical order, and contributed to discussion of the key concepts and issues raised in this manuscript as part of the first formal meeting of INFORMAS from 19 to 23 November 2012.

Address for correspondence: B Kelly, School of Health and Society, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia.

E-mail: bkelly@uow.edu.au

Summary

Food and non-alcoholic beverage marketing is recognized as an important factor influencing food choices related to non-communicable diseases. The monitoring of populations' exposure to food and non-alcoholic beverage promotions, and the content of these promotions, is necessary to generate evidence to understand the extent of the problem, and to determine appropriate and effective policy responses. A review of studies measuring the nature and extent of exposure to food promotions was conducted to identify approaches to monitoring food promotions via dominant media platforms. A step-wise approach, comprising ‘minimal’, ‘expanded’ and ‘optimal’ monitoring activities, was designed. This approach can be used to assess the frequency and level of exposure of population groups (especially children) to food promotions, the persuasive power of techniques used in promotional communications (power of promotions) and the nutritional composition of promoted food products. Detailed procedures for data sampling, data collection and data analysis for a range of media types are presented, as well as quantifiable measurement indicators for assessing exposure to and power of food and non-alcoholic beverage promotions. The proposed framework supports the development of a consistent system for monitoring food and non-alcoholic beverage promotions for comparison between countries and over time.

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