Monitoring foods and beverages provided and sold in public sector settings

Authors

  • M. L'Abbé,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
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    • Members of the writing group for this manuscript, listed in order of their contribution to the writing of the manuscript.
  • A. Schermel,

    1. Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
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    • Members of the writing group for this manuscript, listed in order of their contribution to the writing of the manuscript.
  • L. Minaker,

    1. Propel Centre for Population Health Impact, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada
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    • Members of the writing group for this manuscript, listed in order of their contribution to the writing of the manuscript.
  • B. Kelly,

    1. School of Health and Society, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
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    • Members of the writing group for this manuscript, listed in order of their contribution to the writing of the manuscript.
  • A. Lee,

    1. School of Public Health and Social Work and School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia
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    • Members of the writing group for this manuscript, listed in order of their contribution to the writing of the manuscript.
  • S. Vandevijvere,

    1. School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
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    • Members of the writing group for this manuscript, listed in order of their contribution to the writing of the manuscript.
  • P. Twohig,

    1. Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada
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    • Members of the writing group for this manuscript, listed in order of their contribution to the writing of the manuscript.
  • S. Barquera,

    1. National Institute of Public Health, Mexico City, Mexico
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  • S. Friel,

    1. National Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
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  • C. Hawkes,

    1. World Cancer Research Fund International, London, UK
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  • S. Kumanyika,

    1. Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
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  • T. Lobstein,

    1. International Association for the Study of Obesity, London, UK
    2. Public Health Advocacy Institute of Western Australia, Curtin University, Perth, Australia
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  • J. Ma,

    1. Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CCDC), Beijing, China
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  • J. Macmullan,

    1. Consumers International, London, UK
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  • S. Mohan,

    1. Public Health Foundation of India, New Delhi, India
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  • C. Monteiro,

    1. School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • B. Neal,

    1. The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
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  • M. Rayner,

    1. British Heart Foundation Health Promotion Research Group, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
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  • G. Sacks,

    1. WHO Collaborating Centre for Obesity Prevention, Deakin University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • D. Sanders,

    1. School of Public Health, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa
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  • W. Snowdon,

    1. WHO Collaborating Centre for Obesity Prevention, Deakin University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    2. Pacific Research Centre for the Prevention of Obesity and Non-communicable Diseases (C-POND), Suva, Fiji
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  • B. Swinburn,

    1. School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
    2. WHO Collaborating Centre for Obesity Prevention, Deakin University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • C. Walker,

    1. Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN), Geneva, Switzerland
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  • INFORMAS

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    • INFORMAS is the International Network for Food and Obesity/non-communicable diseases Research, Monitoring and Action Support. All authors who are not members of the writing group are listed in alphabetical order, and contributed to discussion of the key concepts and issues raised in this manuscript as part of the first formal meeting of INFORMAS from 19 to 23 November 2012.

Address for correspondence: M L'Abbé, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, FitzGerald Building, 150 College Street, Rm 315, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3E2.

E-mail: mary.labbe@utoronto.ca

Summary

This paper outlines a step-wise framework for monitoring foods and beverages provided or sold in publicly funded institutions. The focus is on foods in schools, but the framework can also be applied to foods provided or sold in other publicly funded institutions. Data collection and evaluation within this monitoring framework will consist of two components. In component I, information on existing food or nutrition policies and/or programmes within settings would be compiled. Currently, nutrition standards and voluntary guidelines associated with such policies/programmes vary widely globally. This paper, which provides a comprehensive review of such standards and guidelines, will facilitate institutional learnings for those jurisdictions that have not yet established them or are undergoing review of existing ones. In component II, the quality of foods provided or sold in public sector settings is evaluated relative to existing national or sub-national nutrition standards or voluntary guidelines. Where there are no (or only poor) standards or guidelines available, the nutritional quality of foods can be evaluated relative to standards of a similar jurisdiction or other appropriate standards. Measurement indicators are proposed (within ‘minimal’, ‘expanded’ and ‘optimal’ approaches) that can be used to monitor progress over time in meeting policy objectives, and facilitate comparisons between countries.

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