Time course of the effects of orthokeratology on peripheral refraction and corneal topography

Authors


Abstract

Purpose

To describe the time course of changes in both peripheral refraction and corneal topography in myopic adults wearing myopic orthokeratology (OK) lenses.

Methods

Nineteen adult myopes were fitted with OK lenses in both eyes for overnight wear. Central and peripheral refraction and corneal topography were measured along the horizontal meridian at baseline and after 1, 4, 7 and 14 nights of lens wear.

Results

At baseline, refraction was myopic at all positions along the horizontal meridian. Two weeks of OK lens wear caused a significant change in refraction where the general trend was a hyperopic shift in spherical equivalent (M) except at 35° in the nasal visual field where there was instead a myopic shift in M. The most significant change in M occurred between baseline and after 1 night of OK lens wear and the effect became less dramatic across subsequent days of OK treatment. Similarly, OK caused significant change in corneal refractive power at all positions along the horizontal corneal chord. There was a reduction in corneal power or flattening of the cornea at all positions except at 2.4 mm and 2.8 mm on the nasal cornea where there was an increase in corneal refractive power or steepening of the cornea. This change was most apparent after 1 night of OK lens wear and, similar to changes in peripheral refraction, changes in corneal refractive power on subsequent days of OK treatment became less marked.

Conclusions

Orthokeratology caused significant changes in both peripheral refraction and corneal topography. The greatest change in refraction and corneal refractive power across the horizontal corneal meridian occurred during the first night of OK lens wear. Subsequent changes in both peripheral refraction and corneal topography were less dramatic, in the same manner as reported changes in apical radius and central refraction after OK. This study confirms that with OK treatment, the peripheral retina experiences myopic defocus, which is conjectured to underlie the observed slowing of myopia progression.

Ancillary