The Fate of Nontargeted Endocardial Leads during the Extraction of One or More Targeted Leads in Pediatrics and Congenital Heart Disease

Authors

  • ANTHONY C. McCANTA M.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine/Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado
    • Address for reprints: Anthony C. McCanta, M.D., Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine/Children's Hospital Colorado, 13123 East 16th Ave., B100 Aurora, CO 80045; e-mail: anthony.mccanta@childrenscolorado.org

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  • RONN E. TANEL M.D.,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco/UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital, San Francisco, California
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  • JANE GRALLA Ph.D.,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine/Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado
    2. Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, University of Colorado Denver School of Public Health, Aurora, Colorado
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  • DAVID MARTIN RUNCIMAN M.B.B.S.,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine/Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado
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  • KATHRYN K. COLLINS M.D.

    1. Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine/Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado
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Abstract

Introduction

Extraction of targeted endocardial leads can lead to inadvertent damage or dislodgement of nontargeted leads, though the frequency of this has not been reported in pediatrics and congenital heart disease (CHD).

Methods

This is a retrospective review of lead extraction procedures from 2002 to 2010 from two pediatric and CHD centers evaluating unplanned interventions on nontargeted leads during the extraction of one or more targeted leads.

Results

Nontargeted leads were present in the 22 lead extraction procedures performed on 20 patients with median age 15 years (interquartile range, 11.5–18.5 years): 11 (55%) with structurally normal hearts and nine (45%) with CHD. Twenty of 23 targeted leads (86%) were extracted with complete success. Of the 22 nontargeted leads, including 17 atrial leads and five ventricular leads, seven (32%) required further intervention including: five extracted due to damage, dislodgement, or change in device location; one abandoned due to damage; and one dislodged requiring a second procedure for repositioning. The remaining 15 nontargeted leads (68%) were unharmed. Nontargeted leads requiring further intervention had a shorter lead duration in situ (median 2 years, interquartile range 0.5–3.5 years) than unharmed nontargeted leads (median 6.6 years, interquartile range 4.1–9.1 years; P = 0.01). Age at extraction, CHD, implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads, atrial lead position, or primary extraction modality did not predict further intervention for nontargeted leads. Major complications occurred in one procedure (4.5%) with no deaths.

Conclusions

In pediatrics and CHD, nontargeted leads are frequently damaged or dislodged during the extraction of targeted leads. The risk of lead damage or dislodgement has implications for procedural planning and counseling for patients and families of pediatric and CHD patients requiring lead extraction.

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