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Near-infrared spectroscopy: exposing the dark (venous) side of the circulation

Authors

  • John P. Scott,

    1. Departments of Anesthesiology and Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Pediatric Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA
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  • George M. Hoffman

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Anesthesiology and Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Pediatric Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA
    • Correspondence

      George M. Hoffman, Anesthesiology 735, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, 9000 W Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA

      Email: ghoffman@mcw.edu

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Summary

The safety of anesthesia has improved greatly in the past three decades. Standard perioperative monitoring, including pulse oximetry, has practically eliminated unrecognized arterial hypoxia as a cause for perioperative injury. However, most anesthesia-related cardiac arrests in children are now cardiovascular in origin, and standard monitoring is unable to detect many circulatory abnormalities. Near-infrared spectroscopy provides noninvasive continuous access to the venous side of regional circulations that can approximate organ-specific and global measures to facilitate the detection of circulatory abnormalities and drive goal-directed interventions to reduce end-organ ischemic injury.

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