The Prevalence of Comorbid Symptoms of Central Sensitization Syndrome Among Three Different Groups of Temporomandibular Disorder Patients

Authors

  • Kara M. Lorduy MS,

    1. Department of Psychology, College of Science, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas, U.S.A
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  • Angela Liegey-Dougall PhD,

    1. Department of Psychology, College of Science, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas, U.S.A
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  • Robbie Haggard MS, LPC-S,

    1. Department of Psychology, College of Science, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas, U.S.A
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  • Celeste N. Sanders BA,

    1. Department of Psychology, College of Science, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas, U.S.A
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  • Robert J. Gatchel PhD, ABPP

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychology, College of Science, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas, U.S.A
    • Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Robert J. Gatchel, PhD, Professor & Chairman, Department of Psychology, College of Science, The University of Texas at Arlington, 5701 Maple Ave. #100, Dallas, TX 75235, U.S.A. E-mail: gatchel@uta.edu.

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Abstract

Aims

Symptoms of central sensitization syndrome (CSS) were evaluated among three different groups of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. Additionally, TMD group differences in pain and pain-related disability were assessed, as well as emotional distress.

Methods

Participants were 250 patients with symptoms of acute TMD, recruited from dental clinics within a major metropolitan area. Sequential regressions and multivariate analyses of covariance were conducted in order to make group comparisons.

Results

Those with a TMD Muscle Disorder (ie, myofacial TMD [m-TMD]) and those with more than one TMD diagnosis had the most symptoms of CSS and higher reports of pain and pain-related disability. Moreover, emotional distress accounted for a substantial amount of the variance for physical symptoms and mediated all TMD comparisons.

Conclusions

Myofacial TMD is characterized by a high degree of comorbidity of symptoms of CSS and associated emotional distress.

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