Plant, Cell & Environment

Cover image for Vol. 36 Issue 12

December 2013

Volume 36, Issue 12

Pages 2071–2229

  1. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Erratum
    1. Jasmonate signalling: a copycat of auxin signalling? (pages 2071–2084)

      A. CUÉLLAR PÉREZ and A. GOOSSENS

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12121

      The last decade has provided breakthrough discoveries in phytohormone sensing and signal transduction, and highlighted the striking mechanistic similarities between the auxin and jasmonate (JA) signalling pathways, two hormones that regulate diverse aspects of plant growth, development and interaction with the environment. In this review, we list each important element from the ‘core JA perception and early signalling module’, discuss their function and role in the JA-cascade, to which protein family they belong and how striking it is that many of the closely related proteins function in another phytohormonal signalling cascade, that is of the auxins. We discuss the correlation and relevance of the sequence similarities and divergence with regard to the functioning of the respective proteins in the respective signalling cascades.

    2. New insights into the regulation of plant immunity by amino acid metabolic pathways (pages 2085–2103)

      JÜRGEN ZEIER

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12122

      This review summarizes the emerging roles of amino acid metabolic pathways in plant immunity. In particular, the significance of pipecolic acid in systemic acquired resistance, the roles of proline metabolism and polyamine oxidation in ROS generation, the function of aspartate-derived pyridine nucleotide metabolism in pre- and post-invasion defense, amino acid imbalances in the aspartate pathway leading to oomycete resistance, and the influence of amino acid acylation on plant pathogen and pest resistance are highlighted.

  2. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Erratum
  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Erratum
    1. Temperature response of in vivo Rubisco kinetics and mesophyll conductance in Arabidopsis thaliana: comparisons to Nicotiana tabacum (pages 2108–2119)

      BERKLEY WALKER, LOREN S. ARIZA, SARAH KAINES, MURRAY R. BADGER and ASAPH B. COUSINS

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12166

      Biochemical models of photosynthesis use the temperature dependency of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) kinetics and mesophyll conductance to CO 2 (g m). However, the in vivo temperature response of Rubisco kinetics and g m has only been measured in the warm adapted Nicotiana tabacum; therefore, we determined these parameters in the cool-adapted Arabidopsis thaliana to see how species-dependent differences impact modeled rates of photosynthesis. While the individual Rubisco kinetic parameters in N. tabacum and A. thaliana were similar across temperatures, they collectively resulted in significantly different modeled rates of photosynthesis. Additionally, g m increased with temperature in N. tabacum but not in A. thaliana.

    2. Involvement of phytochrome A in suppression of photomorphogenesis in rice seedling grown in red light (pages 2120–2134)

      ANSUMAN ROY, DINABANDHU SAHOO and BAISHNAB C. TRIPATHY

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12099

      Rice seedlings grown on germination paper in red-light (400 μmoles photons m−2 s−1) for 48 h having their shoot-bottom exposed had suppressed photomorphogenesis and were deficient in chlorophyll. Seedlings grown under identical light regime having their shoot-bottom covered in vermiculite or in aluminum foil were green and accumulated chlorophyll. The phyA mutant seedlings grown in red-light having their shoot-bottom exposed were green and accumulated chlorophyll along with the up regulated Chl biosynthesis intermediates. The red-light-induced suppression of photomorphogenesis, perceived in the shoot bottom, is a red-HIR response of PhyA.

    3. The K+/H+ antiporter LeNHX2 increases salt tolerance by improving K+ homeostasis in transgenic tomato (pages 2135–2149)

      RAÚL HUERTAS, LOURDES RUBIO, OLIVIER CAGNAC, MARÍA JESÚS GARCÍA-SÁNCHEZ, JUAN DE DIOS ALCHÉ, KEES VENEMA, JOSÉ ANTONIO FERNÁNDEZ and MARÍA PILAR RODRÍGUEZ-ROSALES

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12109

      We have investigated the role of LeNHX2, an endosomal class-II NHX transporter, in salt tolerance of tomato plants. Overexpression of LeNHX2 in tomato improves NaCl tolerance, decreased cytosolic K and induced K uptake by roots. The results suggest that LeNHX2 improves NaCl tolerance by regulating the activities of K transport systems possibly through modulation of cytosolic K levels.

    4. A closed-form solution for steady-state coupled phloem/xylem flow using the Lambert-W function (pages 2150–2162)

      A. J. HALL and P. E. H. MINCHIN

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12125

      An analytical solution for steady-state coupled phloem/xylem flow is presented, under more general and realistic conditions than has previously been possible. This incorporates the basic Münch flow model of phloem transport, the cohesion model of xylem flow, variations in phloem viscosity with solute concentration, and deviations from the Van't Hoff expression for osmotic potential. The model provides new insights into Münch flow by explicitly including interactions with xylem flow and water potential, and can be used as a component in models of entire plants with multiple sources and sinks.

    5. The stem xylem of Patagonian shrubs operates far from the point of catastrophic dysfunction and is additionally protected from drought-induced embolism by leaves and roots (pages 2163–2174)

      SANDRA J. BUCCI, FABIAN G. SCHOLZ, MARIA LAURA PESCHIUTTA, NADIA S. ARIAS, FREDERICK C. MEINZER and GUILLERMO GOLDSTEIN

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12126

      Hydraulic architecture we studied in shrub species differing in rooting depth in a cold desert in Southern Argentina.

      Shrubs exhibited strong hydraulic segmentation between leaves, stems and roots with leaves being the most vulnerable part of the hydraulic pathway.

      Stems had hydraulic safety margins higher to 2 MPa.

      There was no trade-off between stem or leaf hydraulic resistance and efficiency.

    6. A biomarker based on gene expression indicates plant water status in controlled and natural environments (pages 2175–2189)

      GWENAËLLE MARCHAND, BAPTISTE MAYJONADE, DIDIER VARÈS, NICOLAS BLANCHET, MARIE-CLAUDE BONIFACE, PIERRE MAURY, FETY NAMBININA ANDRIANASOLO, PHILIPPE BURGER, PHILIPPE DEBAEKE, PIERRE CASADEBAIG, PATRICK VINCOURT and NICOLAS B. LANGLADE

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12127

      The need for a precise and robust environmental description is required in many scientific fields to explain how organisms respond to their abiotic and biotic environments.

      Using the sunflower crop as a model, we developed a novel type of biomarker based on gene expression and able to estimate the water available to the plant in controlled and natural conditions. This new kind of molecular tool will be of great interest for eco-physiology, molecular physiology and genetics.

    7. Isotopic composition of transpiration and rates of change in leaf water isotopologue storage in response to environmental variables (pages 2190–2206)

      KEVIN A. SIMONIN, ADAM B. RODDY, PERCY LINK, RANDY APODACA, KEVIN P. TU, JIA HU, TODD E. DAWSON and MARGARET M. BARBOUR

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12129

      Here we demonstrate a new method for evaluating the rate of change in leaf water isosotopologue storage (isostorage) that relies on isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy and leaf gas exchange systems. This method allows estimation of 18O enrichment of bulk leaf water and water at the evaporation site both in the steady state and the non-steady state.

    8. Overexpression of microRNA319 impacts leaf morphogenesis and leads to enhanced cold tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) (pages 2207–2218)

      CHUNHUA YANG, DAYONG LI, DONGHAI MAO, XUE LIU, CHENGJUN JI, XIAOBING LI, XIANFENG ZHAO, ZHUKUAN CHENG, CAIYAN CHEN and LIHUANG ZHU

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12130

      As one of the first characterized and most conserved miRNA families, miR319 has been well studied in dicotyledonous plants, but little is known about their functions in monocotyledons. In this study, using reverse genetics approaches, we demonstrated that in rice, one of the key staple crops in the world, miR319 also plays important roles in leaf morphogenesis as in dicotyledonous plants and particularly in cold tolerance as well.

    9. Experimental evidence for diel δ15N-patterns in different tissues, xylem and phloem saps of castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) (pages 2219–2228)

      A. D. PEUKE, A. GESSLER and G. TCHERKEZ

      Article first published online: 10 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12132

      Nitrogen isotope signatures in plants might give insights in the metabolism and allocation of nitrogen. To obtain a deeper understanding of the modifications of the nitrogen isotope signatures, we determined δ15N in transport saps and in different fractions of leaves, axis and roots during a diel course along the plant axis. The most significant diel variations were observed in xylem and phloem saps where δ15N was significantly higher during day compared to the night. Furthermore, the natural nitrogen isotope abundance in plant tissue is not constant during the diel course – a fact that needs to be taken into account when sampling for isotopic studies.

  4. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Deconstructing crop processes and models via identities (page 2229)

      JOHN R. PORTER and SVEND CHRISTENSEN

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12211

      This article corrects:

      Deconstructing crop processes and models via identities

      Vol. 36, Issue 11, 1919–1925, Article first published online: 17 MAY 2013

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