Plant, Cell & Environment

Cover image for Vol. 37 Issue 3

March 2014

Volume 37, Issue 3

Pages 541–810

  1. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Original Articles
    1. Reconstructing the δ18O of atmospheric water vapour via the CAM epiphyte Tillandsia usneoides: seasonal controls on δ18O in the field and large-scale reconstruction of δ18Oa (pages 541–556)

      BRENT R. HELLIKER

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12167

      Using leaf water and cellulose δ18 O of Tillandsia usneoides in situ, the δ18 O of atmospheric water vapor was reconstructed through two growing seasons in Florida, USA, and through a large-scale transect across the southeastern USA. The reconstruction of δ1 8O a generally supported the assumption of δ18 O a being in equilibrium with precipitation δ18 O, but the pool of δ18 O ppt with which δ18 O a was in equilibrium – growing season versus annual δ18 O ppt – changed with latitude.

    2. Rice flooding negatively impacts root branching and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization, but not fungal viability (pages 557–572)

      MARTA VALLINO, VALENTINA FIORILLI and PAOLA BONFANTE

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12177

      Understanding the mechanisms which regulate the symbiotic interactions between rice roots and the arbuscular mycorrizal (AM) fungi is becoming increasingly important in order to enhance plant yield in the context of sustainable agriculture. We have investigated the complex interactions among rice roots, AM symbiosis, and the environment focusing on the root development in flooding and upland conditions. Due to an experimental system where mycorrhizal rice plants can be moved from flooded to dry conditions and vice versa, and the use of morphological and molecular approaches, we conclusively demonstrated that the water regime is the driving force that decreases AM colonization under flooding conditions, by directly influencing root architecture (decreasing of large lateral roots) and anatomy (increasing of aerenchyma), but without impacting the basic AM functionality.

    3. Poplar calcineurin B-like proteins PtCBL10A and PtCBL10B regulate shoot salt tolerance through interaction with PtSOS2 in the vacuolar membrane (pages 573–588)

      REN-JIE TANG, YANG YANG, LEI YANG, HUA LIU, CUI-TING WANG, MENG-MENG YU, XIAO-SHU GAO and HONG-XIA ZHANG

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12178

      The molecular basis of salt tolerance in woody plants is not well understood. In this work, we characterized two poplar CBL10 homologues that function in shoot salt tolerance. Our results suggest that the calcium sensors PtCBL10s and PtSOS3 play different regulatory roles in salt stress adaptation in poplar. We also provide a feasible way for the genetic engineering of salt-tolerant trees.

    4. Kinetics of xylem loading, membrane potential maintenance, and sensitivity of K+-permeable channels to reactive oxygen species: physiological traits that differentiate salinity tolerance between pea and barley (pages 589–600)

      JAYAKUMAR BOSE, LANA SHABALA, IGOR POTTOSIN, FANRONG ZENG, ANA-MARIA VELARDE-BUENDÍA, AMANDINE MASSART, CHARLOTTE POSCHENRIEDER, YUDA HARIADI and SERGEY SHABALA

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12180

      Salinity tolerance is a complex physiological trait composed of multiple sub-traits. Here we reveal that efficient control of xylem Na+ loading, control of H2O2 accumulation, reduced sensitivity of non-selective cation channels to H2O2 in the root apex, and higher energy saving efficiency are the major physiological traits distinguishing between salt-tolerant (barley) and salt-sensitive (pea) crop species. These traits should be targeted in plant breeding programs aimed on improving salinity tolerance via “pyramiding approach”.

    5. Deciphering the metabolic pathways influencing heat and cold responses during post-harvest physiology of peach fruit (pages 601–616)

      MARTIN A. LAUXMANN, JULIA BORSANI, SONIA OSORIO, VERÓNICA A. LOMBARDO, CLAUDIO O. BUDDE, CLAUDIA A. BUSTAMANTE, LAURA L. MONTI, CARLOS S. ANDREO, ALISDAIR R. FERNIE, MARÍA F. DRINCOVICH and MARÍA V. LARA

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12181

      The application of heat treatment to peach fruit, prior to cold-storage, prime the fruit to cope with abiotic and biotic stresses by modifying the content of a catalogue of metabolites, such as amino acids, sugars, polyols and polyamines, preventing the development of chilling injury symptoms.

    6. Rapid hydraulic recovery in Eucalyptus pauciflora after drought: linkages between stem hydraulics and leaf gas exchange (pages 617–626)

      SEBASTIÀ MARTORELL, ANTONIO DIAZ-ESPEJO, HIPÓLITO MEDRANO, MARILYN C. BALL and BRENDAN CHOAT

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12182

      Xylem embolism has been identified as one of the principal factors involved in drought associated declines of forest health and primary productivity. We investigated links between leaf gas exchange and hydraulic conductivity in Eucalyptus pauciflora during drought and recovery. Close coordination was observed among leaf gas exchange, leaf tissue water relations and the hydraulic capacity of the stem during the dry down phase. Although almost complete hydraulic failure occurred at a Ψx of −3.0 MPa, stem hydraulic capacity was rapidly restored by a xylem refilling mechanism upon re-watering. These results provide crucial information for understanding how linkages between stem and leaf traits influence the recovery of woody plants from drought.

    7. Ectomycorrhizas with Paxillus involutus enhance cadmium uptake and tolerance in Populus × canescens (pages 627–642)

      YONGLU MA, JIALI HE, CHAOFENG MA, JIE LUO, HONG LI, TONGXIAN LIU, ANDREA POLLE, CHANGHUI PENG and ZHI-BIN LUO

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12183

      Ectomycorrhizas (EMs), which are symbiotic organs formed between tree roots and certain fungi, can mediate cadmium (Cd) tolerance of host plants, but the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Populus × canescens was inoculated with or without Paxillus involutus (strain MAJ) and subsequently exposed to 0 or 50 μM CdSO4 . Higher net Cd2+ influx in EMs well corresponded to higher transcript levels of genes involved in Cd2+ uptake, transport and detoxification processes than those in nonmycorrhizal roots. Higher CO2 assimilation, improved nutrient and carbohydrate status, and alleviated oxidative stress were found in mycorrhizal compared to nonmycorrhizal poplars despite higher Cd2+ accumulation.

    8. Genetic variation in yield under hot ambient temperatures spotlights a role for cytokinin in protection of developing floral primordia (pages 643–657)

      SHIRI SOBOL, NOAM CHAYUT, NAHUM NAVE, DINESH KAFLE, MARTIN HEGELE, RINA KAMINETSKY, JENS N. WÜNSCHE and ALON SAMACH

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12184

      Unusually high ambient temperatures (HAT) can cause pre-anthesis abortion of flowers in many diverse species, limiting crop production. A passion fruit genotype with higher resistance to HAT flower abortion was identified and analyzed. Our findings, further tested in Arabidopsis, suggest a protective role for cytokinin on developing flowers exposed to HAT. Cytokinin may influence this process through reduction in gibberellin activity.

    9. MtZR1, a PRAF protein, is involved in the development of roots and symbiotic root nodules in Medicago truncatula (pages 658–669)

      JULIE HOPKINS, OLIVIER PIERRE, THÉOPHILE KAZMIERCZAK, VÉRONIQUE GRUBER, FLORIAN FRUGIER, MATHILDE CLEMENT, PIERRE FRENDO, DIDIER HEROUART and ERIC BONCOMPAGNI

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12185

      We investigated the involvement of the PRAF protein MtZR1 on the development of roots and nitrogen-fixing nodules in Medicago truncatula. MtZR1 was found to be mainly expressed in root meristem and vascular bundles of mature nodules. Down-regulation of MtZR1 mediated by RNAi impaired root and nodule development. In contrast, a significant increase of root and nodule elongation was observed when ZR1 was overexpressed.

    10. A new link between stress response and nucleolar function during pollen development in Arabidopsis mediated by AtREN1 protein (pages 670–683)

      DAVID REŇÁK, ANTÓNIA GIBALOVÁ, KATARZYNA ŠOLCOVÁ and DAVID HONYS

      Article first published online: 3 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12186

      Based on a wide screen of T-DNA mutant lines, we identified the atren1 mutation ( restricted to nucleolus1) in early male gametophytic heat-shock transcription factor (HSF) gene At1g77570 annotated as HSFA5-like. The mutation causes multiple defects in male gametophyte development and progamic phase in both structure and function. atren1/- plants are defective in heat stress response and produce notably higher proportion of aberrant pollen grains. AtREN1 protein is targeted specifically to the nucleolus that suggests its likely involvement in ribosomal RNA biogenesis or other nucleolar functions.

    11. The metabolic acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana to arsenate is sensitized by the loss of mitochondrial LIPOAMIDE DEHYDROGENASE2, a key enzyme in oxidative metabolism (pages 684–695)

      WEIHUA CHEN, NICOLAS L. TAYLOR, YINGJUN CHI, A. HARVEY MILLAR, HANS LAMBERS and PATRICK M. FINNEGAN

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12187

      Arsenic is a common environmental toxin, but its mode of action is not clear in plants. The disruption of mitochondrial LIPOAMIDE DEHYDROGENASE2 increased the sensitivity of Arabidopsis thaliana to arsenate, probably through a mechanism requiring the in planta reduction of arsenate to arsenite. Arsenate induced the remodelling of metabolite pools associated with oxidative metabolism, an effect that was enhanced in the mutant, giving us new clues about the effects of arsenic on Arabidopsis thaliana.

    12. Salicylic acid-dependent and -independent impact of an RNA-binding protein on plant immunity (pages 696–706)

      CHRISTIAN HACKMANN, CHRISTIN KORNELI, MAGDALENE KUTYNIOK, TINO KÖSTER, MATTHIAS WIEDENLÜBBERT, CAROLINE MÜLLER and DOROTHEE STAIGER

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12188

      The RNA-binding protein AtGRP7 promotes resistance against Pseudomonas syringae bacteria. Here we describe increased salicylic acid (SA) levels, PR-1 gene expression, and an enhanced hypersensitive response in plants ectopically expressing AtGRP7. Using SA mutants we demonstrate that the effect of AtGRP7 on immunity has both an SA-dependent and an SA-independent component and relies on signalling through NPR1.

    13. Unravelling the genetic complexity of sorghum seedling development under low-temperature conditions (pages 707–723)

      WUBISHET A. BEKELE, KARIN FIEDLER, AMUKELANI SHIRINGANI, DANIEL SCHNAUBELT, STEFFEN WINDPASSINGER, RALF UPTMOOR, WOLFGANG FRIEDT and ROD J. SNOWDON

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12189

      Sorghum is a promising alternative bioenergy crop for temperate climates, however its use is limited by poor adaptation to low temperatures during and after germination. This study dissected the genetic complexity of multiple traits contributing to pre- and post-emergence chilling tolerance in a segregating sorghum population. Emergence and root establishment were identified as key determinants of development and survival under low-temperature stress. Epistatic QTL hotspots were found to regulate different physiological mechanisms for growth maintenance under chilling temperatures.

    14. Competition between isoprene emission and pigment synthesis during leaf development in aspen (pages 724–741)

      BAHTIJOR RASULOV, IRINA BICHELE, AGU LAISK and ÜLO NIINEMETS

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12190

      Isoprene emission and prenyltransferase reactions of isoprenoid pigment and hormone synthesis compete for the same precursor, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP). Due to an almost an order of magnitude higher specificity for DMADP of prenyltransferases compared with isoprene synthase, isoprene emission always ‘loses’ when pigment synthesis rate is activated such as in developing leaves. This study demonstrates that differences in enzyme kinetics control the balance between ‘essential’ and ‘non-essential’ isoprenoid synthesis.

    15. Impacts of light and temperature on shoot branching gradient and expression of strigolactone synthesis and signalling genes in rose (pages 742–757)

      SAMIA DJENNANE, LAURENCE HIBRAND-SAINT OYANT, KOJI KAWAMURA, DAVID LALANNE, MICHEL LAFFAIRE, TATIANA THOUROUDE, SÉVERINE CHALAIN, SOULAIMAN SAKR, RACHID BOUMAZA, FABRICE FOUCHER and NATHALIE LEDUC

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12191

      Little is known on the impacts of environmental factors on branching gradient and their interactions with the molecular mechanisms that control it. In two rose species, we demonstrated that both light and temperature profoundly modify bud burst gradient as well as expression of rose MAX genes homologues in buds and nodes. However, bursting gradient cannot be explained by a gradient of expression of MAX genes along the stem.

    16. Long-term exposure to elevated CO2 and O3 alters aspen foliar chemistry across developmental stages (pages 758–765)

      J. J. COUTURE, L. M. HOLESKI and R. L. LINDROTH

      Article first published online: 3 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12195

      Plant chemistry will play an important role in regulating ecosystem processes in future environments, but little information exists about the longitudinal effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on phytochemistry, especially for long-lived species such as trees. To address this need, we analyzed foliar chemical data from two genotypes of trembling aspen, Populus tremuloides, collected over 10 years of exposure to levels of CO2 and O3 predicted for the year 2050. Elevated CO2 and O3 altered both primary and secondary chemistry, and the magnitude and direction of the responses varied across developmental stages and between aspen genotypes. Our findings suggest that the effects of CO2 and O3 on phytochemical traits that influence forest processes will vary over tree developmental stages, highlighting the need to continue long-term, experimental atmospheric change research.

    17. Drivers of radial growth and carbon isotope discrimination of bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.) across continental gradients in precipitation, vapour pressure deficit and irradiance (pages 766–779)

      STEVEN L. VOELKER, FREDERICK C. MEINZER, BARBARA LACHENBRUCH, J. RENÉE BROOKS and RICHARD P. GUYETTE

      Article first published online: 6 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12196

      To help determine the prevailing climate conditions for paleo wood that may have grown under conditions with no analogous modern climate, we investigated tree growth and carbon isotope discrimination (Δ13 C) for bur oaks ( Quercus macrocarpa Michx.) across three regions within the species range and two plantings in semi-arid or Mediterranean locations outside of the species range. Our data indicate that growth was strongly controlled by vapor pressure deficit (VPD) in the warmer and drier regions but not at the coolest and wettest region. Meanwhile, an a priori model of canopy-level Δ13 C closely predicted that tree-ring Δ13 C across regions as a function of VPD and light. In combination, Δ13 C and ring-width data should be useful for predicting past wetness or aridity from paleo wood by determining the degree limitation on carbon gain and growth by moisture or light.

    18. Genes for iron–sulphur cluster assembly are targets of abiotic stress in rice, Oryza sativa (pages 780–794)

      XUEJIAO LIANG, LU QIN, PEIWEI LIU, MEIHUAN WANG and HONG YE

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12198

      Iron-sulfur cluster assembly genes have never been studied in rice, Oryza sativa. This work has the first time identified 41 genes in rice that may be involved in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. We found that these genes specifically responded to abiotic stresses, including heavy metals, iron, and methyl viologen.

    19. Antisense suppression of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) sucrose synthase 3 (CsSUS3) reduces hypoxic stress tolerance (pages 795–810)

      HONGYUN WANG, XIAOLEI SUI, JINJU GUO, ZHENYU WANG, JINTAO CHENG, SI MA, XIANG LI and ZHENXIAN ZHANG

      Article first published online: 16 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/pce.12200

      Cucumber is an important horticultural crop, but it often suffers from the heavy rainstorm which led excessive accumulation of water in field so affected the growth in summer growing season. It has been reported that sucrose synthase (SUS; EC 2.4.1.13) was a low oxygen induced protein, but the role and functional mechanism of SUS in low oxygen conditions is controversial. In this study, four putative CsSUS cDNA were first isolated from cucumber. Among these genes, CsSUS3, which was highly expressed in the root and strongly induced by flooding treatment, was chose for the further research. Via histochemical, subcellular localization and antisense suppression of CsSUS3 in cucumber, we found that CsSUS3 played an important role in resisting hypoxic stress.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION