Get access

Nanomechanical analysis of pigmented human melanoma cells

Authors

  • Michal Sarna,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Andrzej Zadlo,

    1. Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Anna Pilat,

    1. Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Magdalena Olchawa,

    1. Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Paraskevi Gkogkolou,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Laboratory for Neuroendocrinology of the Skin and Interdisciplinary Endocrinology, University of, Münster, Münster, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kvetoslava Burda,

    1. Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Markus Böhm,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Laboratory for Neuroendocrinology of the Skin and Interdisciplinary Endocrinology, University of, Münster, Münster, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Tadeusz Sarna

    1. Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland
    Search for more papers by this author

CORRESPONDENCE Michal Sarna, e-mail: michal.sarna@fis.agh.edu.pl

Summary

Based on hitherto measurements of elasticity of various cells in vitro and ex vivo, cancer cells are generally believed to be much softer than their normal counterparts. In spite of significant research efforts on the elasticity of cancer cells, only few studies were undertaken with melanoma cells. However, there are no reports concerning pigmented melanoma cells. Here, we report for the first time on the elasticity of pigmented human melanoma cells. The obtained data show that melanin significantly increases the stiffness of pigmented melanoma cells and that the effect depends on the amount of melanin inside the cells. The dramatic impact of melanin on the nanomechanical properties of cells puts into question widely accepted paradigm about all cancer cells being softer than their normal counterparts. Our findings reveal significant limitations of the nanodiagnosis approach for melanoma and contribute to better understanding of cell elasticity.

Ancillary