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Could pericytic mimicry represent another type of melanoma cell plasticity with embryonic properties?

Authors

  • Claire Lugassy,

    1. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA
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  • Bruno Péault,

    1. Center for Cardiovascular Science, The University of Edinburgh, Queens Medical Research Institute, Edinburgh, UK
    2. Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA
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  • Madhuri Wadehra,

    1. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA
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  • Hynda K. Kleinman,

    1. National Institutes of Health, NIDCR, Bethesda, MD, USA
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  • Raymond L. Barnhill

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA
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CORRESPONDENCE Raymond L. Barnhill, e-mail: RBarnhill@mednet.ucla.edu

Summary

We hypothesize that the interaction between angiotropic melanoma cells and the abluminal vascular surface can induce or sustain embryonic and/or stem cell migratory properties in these tumor cells. As a result, such angiotropic melanoma cells may migrate along the abluminal vascular surface, demonstrating pericytic mimicry. Through these cellular interactions, melanoma cells may migrate toward secondary sites.

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