Cross-cultural measurement equivalence of the Japanese version of Revised Conflict Tactics Scales Short Form among Japanese men and women

Authors

  • Maki Umeda PhD, MPH,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Mental Health, Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
    • Correspondence: Maki Umeda, PhD, MPH, Department of Mental Health, Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan. Email: makiumeda-tky@umin.ac.jp

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  • Norito Kawakami MD, DMSc

    1. Department of Mental Health, Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
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Abstract

Aim

The Revised Conflict Tactics Scales Short Form (CTS2SF) is an instrument used to measure intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration and victimization over the past 12 months.

Methods

The CTS2SF was translated into Japanese, and the reliability (internal consistency and 4-week test–retest reliability) and the concurrent and factor-based validity were examined using two waves of Internet surveys over an interval of 4 weeks. Participants of the survey were 393 Japanese men and women who were registrants of an Internet survey company.

Results

Cronbach's α was greater than 0.5 for most scales, while it was low (α = 0.18) for sexual coercion by partner. The test–retest reliability of the binary variable for the presence or absence of IPV was high (Yule's Q, 0.79–1.00), and moderate between the scores (Spearman's rank correlation, 0.38:0.70). Concordance with the Buss–Perry Aggression Questionnaire, Violence Against Women Screen, and Kessler 6 generally indicated good concurrent validity. The results of the exploratory factor analysis confirmed the three-factor structure of the Japanese version of the CTS2SF.

Conclusion

Although the internal consistency reliability was limited for some sub-scales, its moderate internal consistency and test–retest reliability and good factor-based validity highlighted the benefit of using the Japanese version of the CTS2SF in a large-scale community survey where a shorter scale is required to assess IPV.

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