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Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome in Neonates: An 8-Year Retrospective Study in a Single Institution

Authors

  • Ming Y. Li Ph.D.,

    1. Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders, Key Laboratory of Pediatrics in Chongqing, Chongqing International Science and Technology Cooperation Center for Child Development and Disorders, Chongqing, China
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  • Yi Hua Ph.D.,

    1. Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders, Key Laboratory of Pediatrics in Chongqing, Chongqing International Science and Technology Cooperation Center for Child Development and Disorders, Chongqing, China
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  • Guang H. Wei Ph.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders, Key Laboratory of Pediatrics in Chongqing, Chongqing International Science and Technology Cooperation Center for Child Development and Disorders, Chongqing, China
    • Address correspondence to Guang Hui Wei, Ph.D., or Lin Qiu, Ph.D., Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, No. 136 Zhongshan 2nd Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400014, China, or e-mail: ghwei@cqmu.edu.cn or qiulin118@126.com.

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  • Lin Qiu Ph.D.

    1. Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders, Key Laboratory of Pediatrics in Chongqing, Chongqing International Science and Technology Cooperation Center for Child Development and Disorders, Chongqing, China
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  • Ming Y. Li and Yi Hua contributed equally to the manuscript.

Abstract

Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) is a rare disorder in children. Complications may occur without timely treatment. Mortality in children with SSSS is approximately 4%. Other than a limited number of case reports, data on SSSS in neonates are limited. The objective of the current study was to investigate SSSS in neonates. A retrospective review of neonates with a diagnosis of SSSS from January 2004 to January 2012 was performed. Population distribution, historical features, physical examination findings including laboratory tests, antibiotic therapies, and outcomes were evaluated. Thirty-nine cases were included, 31 (79.5%) in the last 4 years. The mean patient age was 17.4 ± 7.7 days. Boys (25 cases) were more commonly affected, and occurrence during summer and autumn months was more frequent. The face was the most common body part affected and the area most commonly initially affected. Fever, high white blood cell count, and high C-reactive protein levels were uncommon. Pneumonia was the most frequent complication (74.4%). The positive rate of Staphylococcus aureus isolation was low (23.5%). Drug susceptibility tests showed that amoxicillin with clavulanic acid and cephalosporins were effective in practice. The median length of hospitalization was 9.0 days. All of the 39 neonates were cured without scarring. This study established basic epidemiologic characteristics of a group of neonates diagnosed with SSSS. In the presence of a clinical suspicion of SSSS, even with apparently normal laboratory tests, immediate treatment with cephalosporins, β-lactamase-resistant semisynthetic penicillin, or both is advocated.

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