IFAG and Childhood Rosacea: A Possible Link?

Authors

  • Sorilla Prey M.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Bordeaux Segalen, Bordeaux, France
    2. Inserm U1035, Bordeaux, France
    • Pediatric Dermatology Unit, Pellegrin Children's Hospital, Bordeaux, France
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  • Khaled Ezzedine M.D., Ph.D.,

    1. Pediatric Dermatology Unit, Pellegrin Children's Hospital, Bordeaux, France
    2. University of Bordeaux Segalen, Bordeaux, France
    3. Inserm U1035, Bordeaux, France
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  • Juliette Mazereeuw-Hautier M.D., Ph.D.,

    1. Dermatology Department, Larrey Hospital, Toulouse, France
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  • Catherine Eschard M.D.,

    1. Dermatology Department, CHU de Reims, Reims, France
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  • Sébastien Barbarot M.D., Ph.D.,

    1. Dermatology Department, CHU de Nantes, Nantes, France
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  • Franck Boralevi M.D., Ph.D.,

    1. Pediatric Dermatology Unit, Pellegrin Children's Hospital, Bordeaux, France
    2. University of Bordeaux Segalen, Bordeaux, France
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  • Alain Taïeb M.D., Ph.D.,

    1. Pediatric Dermatology Unit, Pellegrin Children's Hospital, Bordeaux, France
    2. University of Bordeaux Segalen, Bordeaux, France
    3. Inserm U1035, Bordeaux, France
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  • Christine Léaute-Labrèze M.D.,

    1. Pediatric Dermatology Unit, Pellegrin Children's Hospital, Bordeaux, France
    2. University of Bordeaux Segalen, Bordeaux, France
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  • on behalf of the Groupe de Recherche Clinique en Dermatologie Pédiatrique


  • PS and LLC had full access to all the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

Address correspondence to Sorilla Prey, M.D., Dermatology Department, Pellegrin Children's Hospital, Place Amélie Raba Léon, 33 076 Bordeaux, France, or e-mail: sorilla.prey@chu-bordeaux.fr.

Abstract

Idiopathic facial aseptic granuloma (IFAG) is a disorder that usually occurs during early childhood. Its pathogenesis remains poorly understood. The objective of this study was to investigate possible relationships between IFAG and childhood rosacea. This was a retrospective multicenter study of patients attending four French dermatologic centers diagnosed with IFAG between October 2000 and July 2007. Patients and their parents were asked to come for a follow-up visit or to make an appointment for a telephone interview. Clinical symptoms of childhood rosacea were recorded: flushing, permanent or recurrent erythema; facial telangiectasia; papules and pustules on the face without comedones or microcysts; preferential location of the lesions on the convexity of the face; and ophthalmologic involvement of rosacea (recurrent chalazions, conjunctival hyperemia, keratitis). Thirty-eight patients, 20 girls and 18 boys, were included in the study. The median age at the time of diagnosis of IFAG was 43 months, with a median follow-up of 3.9 years. Sixteen patients (42.1%) had at least two criteria of childhood rosacea, 11 of 32 (34.4%) with a single lesion and 5 of 6 (83.3%) with multiple lesions. Children with IFAG are at risk for childhood rosacea, and follow-up is advised, including periodic ophthalmologic assessment.

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