Get access

Familial Papular Epidermal Nevus with “Skyline” Basal Cell Layer

Authors

  • Michela Brena M.D.,

    1. Section of Dermatology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico di Milano, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Italy
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Francesca Besagni M.D.,

    1. Section of Dermatology, Department of Surgical Sciences, Parma University, Parma, Italy
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Vinicio Boneschi M.D.,

    1. Section of Dermatology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico di Milano, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Italy
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Gianluca Tadini M.D.

    Corresponding author
    1. Section of Dermatology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico di Milano, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Italy
    2. Pediatric Clinic 1, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico di Milano, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Italy
    • Address correspondence to Gianluca Tadini, M.D., Section of Dermatology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico di Milano, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Via Pace 9, Milan, Italy, or e-mail: gtadinicmce@unimi.it.

    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Papular epidermal nevus with “skyline” basal cell layer (PENS), a novel keratinocytic nevus, has recently been described as a mosaic condition with varying presentations. We herein describe typical PENS lesions, which usually occur sporadically, affecting two members of the same family. The concept of paradominant inheritance is proposed to explain the paradox of occasional transmission of normally sporadically occurring traits.

Ancillary