Associations of biological factors and affordances in the home with infant motor development

Authors

  • Raquel Saccani,

    1. Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
    2. Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
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  • Nadia C Valentini,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
    • Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
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  • Keila RG Pereira,

    1. Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
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  • Alessandra B Müller,

    1. Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
    2. Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
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  • Carl Gabbard

    1. Motor Development Laboratory, Department of Health and Kinesiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA
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Correspondence: Nadia Cristina Valentini, PhD, Department of Physical Education and Physical Therapy, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Felizardo 750, Jardim Botanico, Porto Alegre, RS, Cep: CEP: 90690-200, Brazil. Email: nadiacv@esef.ufrgs.br

Abstract

Background

Whereas considerable work has been published regarding biological factors associated with infant health, much less is known about the associations of environmental context with infant development – the focus of the present cross-sectional study.

Methods

Data were collected on 561 infants, aged newborn to 18 months. Measures included the Affordances in the Home Environment for Motor Development–Infant Scale, Alberta Infant Motor Scale, and selected bio/medical factors. Correlation and regression were used to analyze the data.

Results

Home environmental factors were associated with children's motor development as much as some typically high-risk biologic factors.

Conclusion

The home environment partially explained infant development outcomes and infants at risk could possibly be helped with a home assessment for affordances.

Ancillary