Diagnostic markers of serious bacterial infections in febrile infants younger than 90 days old

Authors

  • Adi Nosrati,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Dana-Dwek Children's Hospital, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
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    • These authors contributed equally.
  • Amir Ben Tov,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatrics, Dana-Dwek Children's Hospital, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
    • Correspondence: Amir Ben Tov, MD, Department of Pediatrics, Dana-Dwek Children's Hospital, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, 6 Weizman Street, Tel Aviv 64239, Israel. Email: amir.bentov@gmail.com

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    • These authors contributed equally.
  • Shimon Reif

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Dana-Dwek Children's Hospital, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
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  • This work was performed in partial fulfillment of the MD thesis requirements (N.A.) for the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.

Abstract

Background

The aim of this study was to assess correlations between demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics and the risk of serious bacterial infection (SBI) in febrile <90-day-old infants.

Methods

Medical records of all infants younger than 90 days old hospitalized at Dana-Dwek Children's Hospital (2006–2008) for evaluation of fever were retrospectively reviewed. Data on clinical, laboratory and demographic characteristics were retrieved and evaluated.

Results

Forty-eight of the 401 study infants (12%) had SBI: most of them had urinary tract infection (43 infants; 90% of all SBI), three infants had bacteremia, one had bacterial pneumonia and one had bacterial meningitis. Significant independent clinical predictors for the diagnosis of SBI included duration of fever, absence of rhinitis and the absence of lung and skin manifestations. Significant independent laboratory predictors were absolute neutrophil count (ANC), platelets, blood urea nitrogen and C-reactive protein (CRP) level. On receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the CRP area under the curve (0.819) was significantly superior to ANC and leukocyte count.

Conclusion

Of the clinical and laboratory variables selected for evaluation, qualitative CRP was the strongest independent predictor for diagnosing SBI and a significantly better diagnostic marker than clinical characteristics, ANC and white blood cell count.

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