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The Strategies of Japanese Public Health Nurses in Medication Support for High-Risk Tuberculosis Patients

Authors

  • Tamae Shimamura M.S., P.H.N., R.N.,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Community Health Nursing, Division of Health Sciences & Nursing, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Atsuko Taguchi M.S., P.H.N., R.N.,

    1. Department of Community Health Nursing, Division of Health Sciences & Nursing, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Sayuri Kobayashi Ph.D., P.H.N., R.N.M.,

    1. Department of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, Tokyo University of Technology, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Satoko Nagata Ph.D., P.H.N., R.N.,

    1. Department of Community Health Nursing, Division of Health Sciences & Nursing, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Joan Kathy Magilvy Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N.,

    1. College of Nursing, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado
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  • Sachiyo Murashima Ph.D., P.H.N., R.N.

    1. Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Oita, Japan
    2. The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
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Correspondence to:

Tamae Shimamura, Department of Community Health Nursing, Division of Health Sciences & Nursing, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan. E-mail: tshimamura-tky@umin.ac.jp

Abstract

Objective

The purpose of this study was to describe the support provided by Japanese public health nurses (PHNs) to high-risk tuberculosis (TB) patients, focusing specifically on the support aimed at preventing interruptions in treatment.

Design and Sample

A qualitative descriptive approach was used with a convenience sample of 11 PHNs in Japan who cared for TB patients at highest risk for medication adherence problems.

Measures

Semi-structured interviews were conducted to learn the scope and practice of PHNs with high-risk TB patients. Data were analyzed using a qualitative descriptive analysis process.

Results

One main theme was identified: “Supporting the patients in overcoming tuberculosis, regaining health, and living a healthier life.” Three categories with five subcategories described the nurses' activities: (1) empathetic and reliable support, (2) motivational strategies for medication adherence, and (3) developing a foundation for healthier life.

Conclusions

The nurses interviewed described creative and extraordinary strategies used to promote medication adherence and facilitate development of a healthy posttreatment lifestyle. Their approach was patient-centered and culturally congruent. Findings may be transferrable to PHN practice in other regions as care for this economically disadvantaged and marginalized population is a critical need.

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